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CALIFORNIA f 

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Accession No l-.D.«7M./.0. 

Call No.O.Qr.0Sl S/9/V 



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STATE 4 




Country Life the Year Round 

Not just a Few Weeks in the Summer — But the Joy of Open Fields — Always the Clean, Clear Air— A 
Garden and Chickens — and as for You, MR. BUSINESSMAN, You are within an hour of your desk. 

No Fogs and No Ferries 

Buy Right at First and You Can Live Contentedly Afterwards. You Owe Yourself and Your Family 
a Home in the Country. Better See How Worthwhile it is to Live in the Heart of the Famous 

"BURLINGAME FOOTHILLS" 



WHERE 



-Large Jots ready for the builder. 

-Some with large trees. 

-Wide Streets, Curbs, Cement Side- 
walks. 

-Trees planted along streets. 

-Electricity, and Street Lights. 

-Pure water from a private system. 

-Gas pipes have been run wherever 
there has been a demand for them 

-Large city stores make daily free 
deliveries. 



Terms if Desired 



ONE 
LOOK 

MEANS 
ALOX 



"It's Cheaper ta Be c o m e Ynur Oxen Land- 
lord Than tQ Reman <• Tenant" 



— 25 Minutes from the Third and 
Townsend Depot. 

— 25 Trains a Day. 

— Interurban Service from Market 
and Fifth Streets. 

— 45 Minutes from the City by 

Automobile. 

— Nearly two hundred homes already 
erected. 

— Wells Fargo and Postoffice on the 
tract. 

— Primary School in center of the 

land. 



Terms if Desired 



225 

Mills Building 
S. F. 



Deal Directly With the Owners 

Office of Easton Estate 



225 

Mill* Building 

S. F. 



X 




Proved 1,250,000 Times 
on 200,000 Cars 



Remember this in the claims we make 
about Goodyear No-Rim-Cut tires: 

More than 1,250,000 Goodyear tires 
have now gone into use. They have been 
tested out, probably, on 200,000 cars. 

Not one of our patent tires ever has 



rim-cut. And the average excess over 
rated size is 16.7 per cent. Motor car 

owners by the tens of thousands have 
proved these average savings. 

And No-Rim-Cut tires— because of this 
proving — now far outsell any other tires 
which men have ever built. 



Tiredom 
Stands Amazed 

For ten years Goodyear tires held 
a minor place. 

Those were the years which we 
spent in perfecting them — in testing 
fabrics and formulas, methods, 
materials. 

Those were the years when 
countless tires were compared, by 
being worn out on our tire-testing 
machines, to learn what methods 
gave the utmost mileage. 

And those were the years when 
we were developing the No-Rim- 
Cut type of tire. 



Then came success. 

Men found these tires out. and 
told others. The others told others. 
Suddenly a flood-like demand came 
from everywhere for Goodyear No- 
Rim-Cut tires. 

In the past two years the demand 
has increased by 500 per cent. It 
has trebled in the past 12 months. 

Almost in a bound, No-Rim-Cut 
tires came to outsell all others. And 
all of Tiredom stands amazed at 
the call for this new-type tire. 



Our Patent Type 
Saves 23 Per Cent 

One reason for this great success 
is a tire as perfect as men ever can 
make. 

Another lies in this hookless tire 
—this tire that can't be rim -cut. 
We control by patents the only 
way to make a practical tire of 
this type. 

Careful statistics show that 23 
per cent of all ruined tires of the 
old type are rim-cut. They may 
be wrecked in a moment beyond re- 
pair if punctured and run Hat. 
They are often rim-cut when but 
nartly deflated. 

No-Rim -Cut tires save this 23 
per cent, for these tires never rim- 
cut. 



Oversize 
Saves 25 Per Cent 

Then these patent tires — No-Rim- 
Cut tires — are made 10 per cent 
over the rated size. 

That means 10 per cent more air 
— 10 per cent added carrying capac- 
ity. That saves the blow-outs due 
to overloading. 

This 10 per cent oversize, with 
the average car, adds 25 per cent 
to the tire mileage. 



These two features together — No- 
Rim-Cut and oversize — mean an av- 
erage saving of 48 per cent. In ad- 
dition to that comes all the saving 
due to Goodyear quality. 




YEAR 



AKRON, OHIO 

No-Rim-Cut Tires — 10% Oversize 

With or Without Non-Skid Treads 



Kills the Upkeep 
Bugaboo 

This new-type lire makes tire up- 
keep a trifling item with the aver- 
age ear. 

Save for misuse, abuse or acci- 
dent, tire cost need amount to little. 

Rlm-< utting is ended forever. 

And the 1(1 per cent oversize adds 
Immensely to the average mileage. 
You, like the others, are hound to 
come to No-Rim-Cut tires. 

814 Per Cent Profit 

Our profit his 1 year on No-Rim- 
Cut tires averaged 8% per cent. 
y/et we have the largest output and 

most modern equipment ever 
known in this industry 

This very small profit is due to 
our quality, to the extra cost Of. Hie 

No-Rim-Cut feature, and 1 ir 

oversize. 

We slate this fact SO thai all may 

know that Hie price of these tires 

is always kept at the minimum. In 
this business, with its fluctuating 
ma let ials, no maker can live on a 
smaller margin of profit. 



Our 1912 Tire Book — based on 13 
years of tire making — is filled with 
facts you should know. Ask us to 
mail it to you. 



THE GOODYEAR TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY, AKRON, OHIO 

Branches and Agencies in 103 Principal Cities We Make All Kinds of Rubber Tires, Tire Accessories and Repair Outfits 

MORE SERVICE STATIONS THAN ANY OTHER TIRE. 

Main Canadian Office, Toronto, Ont. Canadian Factory, Bowmanville, Ont. 

San Francisco Branch: Corner Sutter and Van Ness Telephone Franklin 3661 



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£ 9 

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16 




<2^ Ik&> "ru^sh 



Hundreds of men are making this comment as they see the dis- 
tinctive lines of Stoddard-Dayton cars. Another reason for this 
statement is the Stoddard-Dayton reputation for extraordinary 
service — rendered to owners under all conditions of road and 
weather. All — 




cars — whether the six-cylinder Stoddard-Dayton Knight, the 
Saybrook, the Stratford, or the Savoy — are marked bv dis- 
tinctive qualities, recognizable anywhere. This is true of them 
internally as well as externally. 

STANDARD MOTOR CAR COMPANY 



Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 

Twelfth and Madison Sts., 



Phone Market 1200 



Phone Oakland 3723. 




taU»W»4 July M, M4 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXIV 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 6, 1912 



No. 1 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott. 21 Sutter street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, and 156 B'ifth 
avenue, S. L. Carman, representatives. 

Chicago Office — H. L. Selden, 122 South Michigan Boulevard. 

Boston Office — Charles S. Parr. 526 Tremont Temple. 

London Office — 30 Cornhill. E. C. England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements, or other matter Intended for publication in 
the current number of the SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 
CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, should be sent to the office not later than 
5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (Including postage) — 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, $2.25. 
Foreign — 1 year, $6.00; 6 months, $3.26. 

Tie the bandanna in the dawg's collar and let them both 

disappear in the wilds of the Ozarks. 

It was a brilliant dream of empire, but Hearst finally 

had to wake up and face the familiar facts. 

The Colonel's "third party" now looks to have been mis- 
numbered. It should have been marked with the fatal figures 
"23." 

The Kaiser and the Czar are meeting again on Russian 

soil, and the British lion is not sleeping as well o' nights as he 
did. 

In George Wingfield, Nevada rejoices in a citizen big 

enough to put aside a Senatorial toga freely and insistently 
offered. 

Congress did stop sulking and doing microscopic poli- 
tics long enough to provide funds for the continuation of the 
government. 

California was a long time finding out what the party 

wanted at Baltimore, and doing it. Its Bell rang something of 
a false alarm. 

It cost one saloon man several thousand real dollars to 

find out that public sentiment amounts to something in San 
Francisco nowadays. 

"Champ" Clark bows himself off the political stage 

and gives place to "Champ." Wilson, the heavyweight candi- 
date of the Democracy. 

Five dead is the toll exacted for one of America's ex- 
periments in dirigibles. Germany has paid much more than 
that, and is still experimenting. 

Hearst has a perfectly good little third party that he 

might pass along to T. R. if the Colonel has not got over being 
so mad that he can't think straight. 

Up at Tacoma, the British vice-Consul is charged with 

chopping down an American flag. We suspect that he wants a 
trip back home with no return ticket. 

The real hat in the Democratic ring turned out to be 

not a Missouri "slouch," nor yet a Nebraska "statesman's lid." 
but a mortarboard, Princeton model. 



Grover Cleveland's widow was one of those who saw 

another Princetonian besides her distinguished husband called 
to lead the Democracy. Lucky omen! 

At Baltimore it was demonstrated that nothing on earth 

could stop the party from kicking that houn' dawg aroun'. It 
kept up the process for one solid week. 

It was some convention, and Baltimore broke the record 

for putting up the prices and keeping them that way as long as 
there was a delegate left to be fed and bedded. 

Willum J. Burns, detective, displays the same red- 
headed temper at Los Angeles that helped to make things 
hum during the late unpleasantness in San Francisco. 

Dickie Davis, author, with a perfectly new divorce in 

his possession, prepares to wed the original "Yama Yama" 
girl. The rest is too easy to make profitable guessing. 

Optimistic announcement is made by the exposition 

management that the enterprise will soon be employing seven- 
teen thousand men. "Soon" is the word, you will observe. 

Those naughty little boys who went swimming on the 

grounds of a girls' college across the bay are related to have 
been clad only in garments of tan and youthful innocence. 

The "financier of the graft prosecution" displayed his 

customary judgment in declaring himself for Bryan at the 
moment when that gentleman is busy putting himself in further 
wrong than ever. 

The Oleson citizenship rehearing at Seattle appears to 

have turned into a trial of the personal morals and habits of 
Judge Hanford. It is hard to see what those matters have to 
do with the real issue. 

Philadelphia despatches telling in pessimistic terms 

how the crack in the Liberty Bell is widening indicate that 
the Quaker City is getting ready not to let us have that sacred 
relic for our Exposition. 

It will be entirely competent now for those eight — or 

seven or six — little Governors to get together outside the 
breastworks for a lodge of sorrow. They need help to deter- 
mine where they are politically "at." 

Whew-w-w! Two solid weeks of national conventions, 

and summer weeks at that. Now, mercifully, we can get back 
to consideration of truly important things, like the baseball 
score and the price of ham and eggs. 

Just imagine how happy Governor Johnson is over the 

selection of Wilson by the embaltimored Democracy! Hiram 
may now begin to practice college yells and wear a black and 
yellow "tiger" badge in his buttonhole. 

The star airwoman of the world dared the perils of the 

British Channel flight only to be hurled to a horrible death on a 
peaceful evening in Boston Harbor. It does "get them," this 
swift and certain Nemesis that guards the upper air. 



Governor Wilson of New Jersey 
A Creditable Nomination, now; President Wilson of the 

United States in 1913. That is a 
prediction that matches with conservative prophecy; it is 
strictly in keeping with the logic of events political to date, and 
in line with the expected and the probable. 

The nomination is in every way creditable to Democratic in- 
telligence and ■'visdom, a fortunate outcome of a situation that 
was full of ugly possibilities. More than that, it goes a long 
way toward relieving the general and national problem of much 
potential unpleasantness. There is now neither reason nor ex- 
cuse for Roosevelt's contemplated "third party" campaign. He 
must either proclaim himself wholly insincere and selfish, or 
he must move strongly and early to the support of Wilson. The 
New Jersey Governor is all that Roosevelt has ever claimed 
to be in point of honesty; he stands upon a personal and party 
platform which includes the best there is in progressivism. 

The chances are that, no matter what Roosevelt does, the 
elements in both parties to which he has looked for support 
in any independent canvass will be found in November lined 
up stoutly for Wilson. Roosevelt may still seek to make a 
party out of his sorehead sideshow. He is a trickster, a politi- 
cian in the baser sense of the term, a vain, ambitious man who 
puts himself above party law and party need, above the com- 
mon decencies, such as keeping simple faith. He wants office 
— but he won't get it. Wilson's nomination puts the Colonel 
off the board, even of his own pharisaical and farcical move- 
ment. The movement stops moving before it starts. 

The Clark boom was fatally handicapped. Without Hearst's 
brand all over it, there might have been small chance of its 
leading even to a nomination, and no chance at all of an elec- 
tion. With Hearst as Clark's chief spokesman and confidant 
there never was any chance that the Missourian could poll the 
requisite two-thirds of the Baltimore convention. Indeed, his 
candidacy never counted for anything beyond the purposes 
of delay and trading. The strongest argument against the 
speaker from the start was the identity of his strongest advo- 
cate. In spite of all the bitterness of the long drawn out ses- 
sion at Baltimore, there is no sufficient reason why every ele- 
ment there represented and contending should not support Wil- 
son. Bryan and Hearst have had their savage and punishing 
encounters, but both of them will be behind Wilson because 
there is no other place for them to go, and because, further, they 
will both smell and spell victory for the New Jersey man. So 
with all the other Democratic factions; so with the rebellious 
Republican faction which it was Roosevelt's purpose to marshal 
under his own bandanna banner. 

There was no other candidate at Baltimore whose selection 
would have meant so much for the party, no other who could 
have drawn together the factions of his own party and drawn 
so heavily upon the strength of the opposition. The situation 
is greatly simplified for Republican leaders like Hadley and 
Borah and their kind, who would not have followed Roosevelt 
out of their party, but who will, actively or passively, contrib- 
ute much to the forces of a man of Wilson's high standing, un- 
questionable honesty and high devotion to principle. 

Thus the contest to be waged this fall is purged of its bitter- 
ness, and the country is relieved of the necessity of angry and 
acrimonious wrangling throughout a four months' campaign 
that must have grievously unsettled commercial and financial 



conditions. We know now that it will be either Taft or Wilson, 
and both are men of principle and high patriotism. Wilson 
stands to win handsomely, and the country can look forward to 
that result without any fear. He is honest, but he admits that 
there can be disagreement with him and his views, and yet no 
dishonesty on the other side. He is honest, but concedes that 
he is not the only American built that way. He is progressive, 
but he is not a demagogue. 



The Pacific Coast 
Protected Against 
High Cost of LrviN 



Any man or woman about San 
Francisco Bay, or any other Pacific 
Coast harbor upon whom the high 
cost of living presses, ought to do 
some thinking and acting as to a 
detail of food supply that is little now, but might easily become 
big and important — the fish food item. 

The cattle ranges grow smaller and the haul of meat to mar- 
ket longer and more costly. Beef, mutton, pork, all grow more 
and more expensive; they will never be cheaper until some 
other line of staple food competes with them in price, nutritive 
values and popularity. The only product which can fill the 
bill is fresh fish. Vegetables are not and never will be in the 
running; poultry can not compete because of cost of production 
and uncertainty of supply. Relief for the over-taxed and under- 
furnished table must come from the sea. 

It is true now that fish is expensive out of all true proportion 
to the amount of the supply, and the theoretical cost of getting 
it into the hands of the consumer. That, however, is due en- 
tirely to the old, foolish notion and tradition — religious in its 
origin — that only Friday is fish day. When any such com- 
munity as San Francisco's metropolitan area and its immediate 
neighborhood understands that fish is good to eat any day 
and every day, and eats it so, then fish will be a great deal 
cheaper — and so, too, will fresh meat. 

The Pacific in all latitudes teems with the finest food fish in 
the world. From Alaska to Central America the supply is in- 
calculable, and the variety wide. It needs only regular daily 
consumption to bring into play such equipment for catching, 
storing and distributing as will make prices low and constant 
to the consumer, and yet very remunerative to the men and the 
capital engaged in the trade. When the public calls for fish 
seven days a week it will be served, and at a price that will go 
a good way toward cutting down the cost of living. That con- 
dition must inevitably lower the cost of fresh meats of all kinds. 

Older countries have learned this lesson, though not under 
conditions so favorable as ours in San Francisco. The fishers 
of the west coast of Europe, and even of our own Atlantic 
Coast, must face weather conditions such as are rarely known 
to us. The storms on other coasts that come with every winter, 
and that are possible at any other season, make fishing pre- 
carious as an industry, and as a source of food supply. And it 
is a matter of experience that the supply elsewhere is smaller, 
more migratory and uncertain than hereabouts. The cod fish- 
eries of the Newfoundland banks and the sardine fisheries of 
France and Spain, are cases in point. 

Particularly with respect to the fishes that spawn and propa- 
gate at sea, without running the rivers, the local supply is well 
regarded as inexhaustible for all present calculation and needs. 
The boats that go out of this harbor could keep busy all the 
year round seven days a week, could be multiplied many times 



July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



Germany and 
"Big Business." 



in number and producing capacity, and could feed many times 
our population all those seven days without making appreciable 
inroads upon the supply. 

Teach, preach and practice the daily eating of fish if you 
would solve the problem of expensive living. Pound for pound, 
fish is as nourishing as any meat, is even more digestible. Prop- 
erly prepared, it is fully as attractive as an article of diet. 

JBT 

The alleged greed and thieving pro- 
pensities of industrial corporations 
and railway companies, often called 
"trusts," are supplying the profes- 
sional office seekers with loud political thunder these days, 
and they are making the most of it to prejudice the people 
against the very bulwark of the nation's progress. But there 
is nothing new in these assaults on capital when engaged in 
bettering the public welfare. All the ancient, as well as the 
more modern nations, heard the noise of the same kind of 
political thunder, and always it assumed to speak in defense 
of a corporation ridden people, and always, too, the voice of the 
thunder was nothing more than the voice of a leather-lunged 
politician hoodwinking the people for personal political advan- 
tage, and sooner or later the people are brought to a realizing 
sense of how grossly they have been deceived into making war 
on the sources of the currents of industry, which carry human 
welfare and better conditions of existence to them. At times 
the people of every nation kill the goose that lays golden eggs 
for them, and always it is at the instigation of political agita- 
tors or self-appointed "reformers." 

Germany and England furnish most excellent object lessons 
in warfare on industrial corporations, which the people of the 
United States might study to their profit along with the 
speeches of the Roosevelts and the Johnsons, two gentlemen 
who have volunteered to save the plain people and labor from 
the merciless wheels of corporation juggernauts. In 1512, four 
hundred years ago. the political and anti-corporation agitators 
of Germany warned the "common people" that the industrial 
companies had grown to such magnitude that they had become 
a dangerous menace to the welfare of the people. The agita- 
tion excited the public to such a degree that the Diet appointed 
a committee to investigate. The committee, in turn, solicited 
the aid of chambers of commerce and boards of trade of the 
principal cities, to ascertain how far the business corporations 
should be restrained and their methods supervised by public 
authority. The committee's report to the Diet was: "It is im- 
possible to limit the size of the corporations, for that would 
limit business and hurt the common welfare : the bigger and 
more numerous they are the better for everybody. If a mer- 
chant (or manufacturer) is not free to do business in Germany, 
he will go elsewhere, to Germany's loss. It is impossible to 
set a limit to business, and it would be well to let the merchant 
alone and put no restrictions on his ability or capital." 

The recommendation of the Diet's committee has been the 
unwritten law of Germany, as to corporations, ever since 1512, 
and that may be said to be the reason why Germany's merchants 
and manufacturers are seen in every market of the world, sell- 
ing their goods and wares, which in turn has raised Germany 
to a high level of State and individual wealth, but Germany ex- 
ercises a supervisory authority over her "big business" to 
encourage, and not hinder or retard. For four hundred years 
Germany has held that the bigger and more numerous the "big 
business" corporations the greater would be labor's opportu- 
nity to secure employment at remunerative wages. That is 
Germany's way of taking care of the goose that lays golden 
eggs. 



It is sound sense on the part of the 
Carnegie Lirrary Gift. Supervisors to stand fast for the ac- 
ceptance of the Carnegie library 
gift. Mr. Vogelsang says well when he exclaims that he only 
wishes the amount were ten times as great. 

The only opposition to acceptance comes from the labor 
unions, or, rather, from the shrewd people who manipulate those 
organizations for political and industrial purposes. They are 
accustomed to make up labor's mind without consulting it, and 
then they depend on loud talk and the "discipline" of the cen- 
tral bodies to avoid challenge thereafter. The library matter 
was approached in that familiar way. It was only when they 
saw themselves out-voted in the board that the Supervisors 
who belong or cater to unionism proposed to put the city to 
the expense of a referendum election on the subject. That 
proposition was promptly and properly rejected. 

The News Letter was somewhat surprised to see Walter Mac- 
Arthur taking sides with the "tainted money" crowd in this dis- 
pute. MacArthur is usually fair minded and right minded, 
staunch union advocate and champion though he is. This time 
he got in wrong. As far as we have been informed, he has not 
attempted to meet the very pertinent question of why we 
should gratefully take Carnegie's money as part of our calamity 
relief fund and sternly refuse money out of the same pocket 
for a library. In fact, that question is ignored by the anti-Car- 
negie disputants. 

The notion about "tainted money" is absurd and exploded. 
It never did get any standing as a principle of public or private 
morals. No matter what offense against labor or any other 
element or against any law or code in the making of a fortune, 
it would be stupid, illogical and even unjust to deny the 
offender a chance to make restitution and reparation. Indeed, 
the greater the offense and the fortune, the greater should be 
the opportunity and encouragement to give it back to the out- 
raged or the plundered. 

SB" 

During the last ten days San Francisco has held the at- 
tention of the great American public almost as much as Balti- 
more, through the convention of the General Federation of 
Women's Clubs held here. Including the unusually large fol- 
lowing from this State and elsewhere of those interested in the 
discussions and the work, the Convention League estimates the 
number of visitors to be between three and four thousand. 
Tickets are good for sixty days, and can easily be extended, 
and the ladies are showing themselves only too glad to make 
the stay in San Francisco and vicinity as long as possible. The 
Biennial will undoubtedly leave a great deal of money behind it. 

■XT 

The Pure Food inspectors of San Francisco have a large 

task to perform. Impure foods and impure liquors may be 
found in every store and in every cafe. One case in point 
is the honey sold in various cafes. If the Pure Food inspectors 
will select honey for a test case, and secure samples from the 
cafes and have them analysed, great good will result to the 
public. Honey that is not honey is injurious to the health, and 
should be forced off the market. 

IB- 

The nationalization of the railways of England is ad- 
vocated by several ministers of the King's Cabinet. Railway 
employees favor the scheme. 

Nearly 200,000 of the women of Japan earn their liveli- 
hood outside of their homes. Many of them work in the fields 
and some on the docks. 



San F 



rancisco 



News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 



The first requirement of a public 
Our Inefficient water company is a never-failing 

Water System. source of supply and a never-failing 

distributing plant to satisfy current 
demands. Neither of these requirements does the Spring Val- 
ley corporation possess. Consequently San Francisco's water 
supply is always uncertain because the supply company has 
only a limited source. It has enough distributing mains, but 
tmly when the rainfall is copious are the storage reservoirs 
equal to the demand for distribution. It is not the fault of 
Spring Valley that the outlying sections of San Francisco com- 
plain that they have an inadequate supply of water, and that the 
mains are empty. The fault lies in the inadequacy of the 
water company's source of supply. In other words, the Spring 
Valley's sources have not kept pace with the steadily increas- 
ing requirements of San Francisco, which in turn obliges the 
Spring Valley to seek new and adequate sources of supply. 
The distributing or accessorial service of the Spring Valley is 
ample, or would be for all domestic purposes, if only there was 
water enough to fully utilize the system, but inasmuch as there 
is not, independent of uncertain rain precipitation, it would 
seem to follow that the plan to take over the water company's 
plant would have to be abandoned, and the city look to the 
Sierras. 

It is pretty generally conceded that the Hetch-Hetchy pro- 
ject is far from being feasible from an economic or financial 
viewpoint, but the city should not be deterred on that account, 
but rather spurred on to seek what is wanted until it is found 
and secured. Moreover, the work should be expedited, be- 
cause of the imperative demand for a sufficient water supply 
at the earliest day possible. Aside from the present shortage 
of water for domestic purposes, the fact should be considered 
that such outlying districts as the Sunset and Richmond are 
already without sufficient fire protection and without enough 
water to insure desirable sanitary conditions. However, the 
most imperative of the demands for a satisfying water supply 
comes from the peninsula, which is filling up very rapidly with 
home builders who will have to depend upon San Francisco's 
source of water supply, and the same may be said of all the bay 
cities, since it is generally conceded that sooner or later they 
will be a part of the municipality of San Francisco and will 
have to depend largely on the artificial public utilities of the 
greater city. But first let us provide an adequate supply of 
water for the San Francisco of to-day, with ample plans to 
extend its scope as the years may require. Meanwhile it would 
be well if the Supervisors would acquaint the public with the 
situation concerning the various improvements provided for by 
the several bond issues. 

In 1908 the Supervisors voted a 
Who Has the bond issue for the express purpose 

Appropriation? of procuring a site and erecting a 

garbage incineration plant at North 
Beach. The public heartily approved of the project, and in- 
dorsed the proposed expenditure, and now the public, seeing 
that not a hand has been turned in the premises, is asking: 
"What has become of the appropriation?" It is not openly 
charged that the money has been diverted for personal uses, but 
a mystery has been created by the indifference of those who 
have the work in charge. As long ago as last December, a 
Supervisor asserted without qualification that the plant would 
be erected immediately, but "immediately" seems to have no 
definite meaning in the vocabulary of San Francisco's Super- 
visors, or rather it has a meaning which is procrastination, with- 
out stooping to an explanation. The cities of the United States 



are famous for the excellence of their sanitary appliances and 
conditions, and the sentiment for a clean and healthy city in 
San Francisco is just as strong as it is in other cities, only that 
in other cities public sentiment obliges officials to do their duty 
or resign. 

Four years is too long to hold onto money that was set aside 
to ward off infections. The people are already wondering what 
it all means. A good sanitary engineer would have had a 
first class garbage reduction furnace in full operation in six 
months after the appropriation was made, but red tape is a con- 
venient thing to have about, when delays are being hatched to 
fool the public. Long ago a desirable site was secured at North 
Beach. Meanwhile the absolute need of a garbage reduction 
plant becomes more urgent. Everybody knows that it is a 
dangerous mistake to ignore sanitary conditions, and most 
everybody is asking: "What is delaying the construction of the 
authorized incineration plant? What has become of the money 
appropriated for that purpose?" 

jsr 

A census bulletin just issued con- 
Interesting Figures. tains information that is well calcu- 

lated to effectually contradict our 
fond belief that this is a nation whose government is by the 
people. The bulletin referred to shows that the United States, 
aside from outlying possessions, and not counting women 
voters, has a voting population of 26,999,251. A comparison of 
the voting strength of the country with the number who go to 
the polls on election days clearly shows that this is nearly al- 
ways a government by the minority of the people for all the 
people. The highest vote ever cast was in 1908, when the total 
vote for all presidential candidates aggregated only 14,888,442, 
not much more than one-half of the then total possible vote. In 
the recent presidential primaries, when the "call of the people 
was for the Colonel," less than 3,000,000 of the 26,000,000 citi- 
zens of voting age voted at all for anybody, and in Oregon a 
plurality of the minority won out. The entire vote for dele- 
gates to the Chicago convention did not represent anywhere 
near 50 per cent of the actual voting strength of the Republican 
party, as reflected in the Presidential vote in 1908. It is cer- 
tainly true that according to the returns of the last three or four 
national elections that this is not a government by the majority 
of the nation's voting population. The leaders of the Republi- 
can party are counting on 8,000,000 votes in November, which 
is an admission that they expect to win with less than one- 
third of the possible vote of the voting population. 

XT 

The Cuban revolution seems to be on its last legs. Too 

many Generals have had their heads shot off. 



BLACK 

AND 

WHITE 

SCOTCH WHISKEY 



The Quality Scotch Which Enjoys the 
Greatest Popularity 



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Pacific Coast Agents 

214 Front Street, San Francisco 



••Hear the Crier? Who the devil art thou?" "One that will play the derll, elr, with you." 



China has rejected the $300,000,000 loan offered by the 

big Powers. Here's a pretty condition of financial diplomacy 
with the Oriental insistently thrusting back our proffered 
money. Is this another case of "come see?" and was Truthful 
James as wise as he is credited with being when he remarked, 
"And for ways that are dark and for tricks that are vain, the 
heathen Chinee is peculiar?" 

Like the farmer's, the fisherman's success is all a matter 

of luck. A well known angler started joyfully for the Humboldt 
streams, and on his way to the ferry dropped into a Market 
street cafe to buy fish bait. What followed need not be de- 
tailed, except to state that the fishy story he recounted later in 
the divorce court was simply scoffed at. 

Texas Tommy and his terpsichorean playmates have 

come to stay, despite the rude rebuff of the moralists. Governor 
West, of Oregon, put a wayside stopping resort under martial 
law, this week, in trying to quell Tommy antics with the 
Bunny Hug. As usual, the two merely skipped to another re- 
sort, and continued their alluring frolic. 

No lady delegate shied her Paris bonnet into the political 

ring during the recent meeting of the Federation of Women's 
Clubs in this city. Perhaps that is why the steam roller, the 
police, casus belli, vox populi, and other scavengers of peace 
didn't appear while the vote was being polled for the presidency 
of that organization. 

The two big political conventions have received so much 

sensational advertising through the daily press that the mana- 
gers might easily raise the requisite campaign funds by adding 
several brass bands, a corps of referees and physicians to the 
gatherings, and putting them on the national vaudeville circuit. 

Alas ! On what degenerate days have we fallen. George 

Wingfield, the mining promoter, has just declined an appoint- 
ment to the U. S. Senate from Nevada. There were mining 
giants in the olden days who would have gladly paid $250,000 
for a chance to grab the honor now so indifferently thrust by. 

Owing to the temporary shortage of funds in Uncle 



Sam's treasury, while cleaning up the fiscal year, army men 
have been called upon to waive their demands for salaries. 
There will be some picturesque army charges on Washington 
as soon as the treasury begins to fill. 

The unconscionable kidlets who started a bathing resort 

in a pond on the Mills Seminary grounds had a Morganesque 
idea, but as they forgot to clothe their deviltry properly, they 
ended in the police court, to the great relief of the shocked 
seminary management. 

The city bonds offered for sale this week commanded a 

premium of some $250,000, evidence that the credit of San 
Francisco is rising in the financial barometer since the retire- 
ment of the last administration, when bonds could not be mar- 
keted to any advantage. 

Despite the shouts of "Thieves! Robbers! Help!" at 

both conventions, the police booked no arrests for grand lar- 
ceny. 



The Baltimore convention is struggling its level best to 

demonstrate practically Mr. Dooley's axiom that the Demo- 
cratic party can be trusted to make its own mistakes without 
copying the mistakes of the Republican party. 

The Baroness von Suttner, who won a Nobel prize for 

her work in spreading peace propaganda, and is now addressing 
California audiences, should be tested out in the Baltimore 
convention in order to really gauge her ability. 

A movement is on foot to amend the charter so as to em- 
power the city authorities to take over and manage the San 
Francisco water front. Every resident of the bay counties 
ought to boost that movement. 

The Supervisors propose to take a shot at the present 

hideous double-deck street advertising signs. Let us hope 
they'll use a fourteen inch gun with a double charge, and make 
a wrecking center shot. 

A thief this week stole a valuable diamond ring from a 

sleeping woman's finger. How careless of her not to leave the 
ring in one of her dress pockets. The thief might have been 
searching for it yet. 

The loss of life and property in the recent Regina tornado 

and in the sinking of the Titanic, demonstrates that the genus 
homo is still very far from being able to "harness the 
Cyclops of Nature." 

The carpet soldiers are furbishing up their uniforms 

again: the House has just voted to set aside $1,350,000 for more 
army maneuvres, and poison oak remedy companies are work- 
ing overtime. 

Mexico's fate is hanging on another "crucial" battle 

scheduled for this week. This makes the umpty-ump news- 
paper test that has decided the life of poor old shot-to-pieces 
Mexico. 

Another trust has just been dissolved in the East, and its 

shares have increased some twenty-five per cent in value. Is 
rubber an ingredient of the trusts that their shares are so 
elastic ? 

The waiters' strike in the New York hotels ended this 

week with a bang and a celebration. The nation failed to notice 
it, however, owing to the din of the Baltimore convention. 

A curious statistician has just figured out that the baths 

at the Capitol of the United States Senators cost $6 a dip. That 
explains the popular use of the immunity bath among them. 

A Londoner is said to have bought an old masterpiece 

recently "for a song." Perhaps it was part of the same song 
masterpieces of the old-time are said to have been sold for. 

Smuggled opium was found in the lather of a Kearny 

street barber shop this week. San Franciscans will be finding 
it in their breakfast coffee next. 

Detective Burns was fined this week in the Darrow 

case, an offshoot of the MacNamara trials, his first contribution 
in paying the piper! 



E. H. Tryon, president of the Union League Club, and dele- 
gate to the late Republican national convention, came home the 
other day decked in the glories of honorable warfare and the 
fruits of victory. Tryon, it will be remembered, was one of the 
two California-Taft delegates whom the Roosevelt- Johnson fol- 
lowing tried, unsuccessfully, to unseat in the big Republican 
gathering. In consequence, he became famous over night, as 
it were, and his homeward progress was in the order of a tri- 
umphal journey Naturally his chest increased several inches 
in expansion, and his hat band shrunk. "Ha! Ha!" he would 
cry triumphantly. "Did you see me cast my vote? I voted for 
Haft. Any time they put one over on your Uncle Dudley! Well, 
eld man, here's how!" and so on. 

Sad as it is to tell the tale, painful disillusionment awaited 
him. Uncle Dudley was due to be shocked, and not only shocked 
but squelched. When the train rolled into the depot he de- 
scended hastily in search of his wife, whom he expected to 
meet him. As he stooped to kiss her, his eye was caught and 
held by a large, round button decorating the smart, tailored suit 
which she wore. In the center of that button the redoubtable 
Teddy, his arch enemy, grinned toothfully up at him. Now 
Tryon is a gentleman, so he didn't indulge in any cuss damns. 
He just reached down and plucked Lhe offensive piece of cellu- 
loid from its abiding place, unheedful of his wife's protests. 
Then after the manner of man, he refused to discuss the subject 
further. 

But the worst was yet to come. On arriving at the Tryon 
home, its returning lord was amazed to find it decorated in bril- 
liant red bandana handkerchiefs, Roosevelt pennants and but- 
tons large and small. From the piano a sketch of the teething 
Colonel smiled down upon him, while the mantel boasted an 
assortment of likenesses of the same subject, both large and 
small. Tryon turned to his wife anxiously. "My dear," he 
said, "I really fear my trip has been too much for me. I'm 
positively seeing things. Are there by any chance any pictures 
of Roosevelt over the fireplace?" On his wife's affirmative 
nod, Tryon dashed over to the mantelpiece, and the work of 
destruction began. 

Mrs. Tryon watched her energetic spouse with a glint of 
amusement in her eyes. "Just the same," she observed calmly 
when the tumult had subsided a bit, "your vote for Taft in the 
Presidential election won't do him a bit of good. I'll cast 
my ballot for Roosevelt, and nullify yours." 

And now Tryon is wondering how he ever became weak- 
minded enough to vote for woman suffrage. 
5 S 5 

A certain well known railroad official here in town has come 
to believe the old adage about "wilful waste," etc., implicitly. 
This official, like most of his kind, is endowed with uncommon 
privileges, such as the use of transportation passes, frank 
books, and the like, and there is nothing which so wrings his 
immortal soul as having to pass in at the end of the company's 
year an unused length of scrip or its equivalent in telegraph 
stamps. 

A short time ago he and his wife were entertaining some 
married friends prior to their departure on a vacation trip to 
Seattle, where they expected to remain for a couple of weeks 
or more, when suddenly Blank remembered his frank book. 

"By the way," he remarked, "when you haven't anything else 
to do, wire us what sort of a time you're having and send it 
'collect.' It's pretty nearly time to turn my book in, and I 



haven't begun to finish it. The more telegrams the better. I 
never like to send in any unused stamps." The friends bade 
them good-bye, after having promised to keep up a running 
fire of telegrams on the many pleasures of their trip. 

About a week later Mrs. Blank was called to the front door 
by the arrival of a messenger boy who presented her with a 
telegram which looked like a night letter in Sunday clothes. 
It read something like this : 

"We reached Seattle yesterday afternoon after a perfectly 
delightful trip. We had pleasant company all the way, and 
dreaded to see the end of our journey. This morning we went 
for a long ride through the residence section, and out into the 
surrounding country. The weather is superb. Couldn't ask for 
better. Seattle is a splendid city. The Missus says to tell 

Mrs. B that the shops here are very good indeed. Will 

wire again as you requested in a few days." 

Now the telegram came by way of the Postal Telegraph, and 
horror on top of horrors! the Blanks possessed a Western 
Union frank book. The shock of that bill will probably linger 
in Mrs. Blank's consciousness for the remainder of her days. 
After she had disgorged most of the ready cash on hand, she sat 
down to wait for her husband, and the two spent the greater 
part of the evening in meditation over the fiendish warning 
contained in the last sentence of the message. 

About four days later came a wire that made the first look 
like a word of three syllables, and the Blanks tore their hair 
and emptied their pocketbooks accordingly. The third one 
showed a leaning toward expansion, while the fourth one spoke 
of a probable extension of their stay in the Northern city. 
Blank is now trying to devise some means by which he can re- 
call his helpful friend, and so put an end to the terrific drain on 
his finances. Another week and the railroad official declares 
he will be a ruined man. 

?r S o- 

In the cafe of a leading San Francisco hotel one recent after- 
noon I was present at a chat where that much abused individual, 
commonly called the piker, was well defended. He was shown 
to be by no means the despicable character that he is usually 
considered. 

"When you call a man a piker," said one of the coterie, "you 
think that is the last word of contempt. The piker is a sensible 
man. He is a man who guards his roll. The reverse of the 
piker is the fool who lets his leg get pulled every chance he 
gets. A piker is never broke. The average millionaire is a 
piker. If he had not been, he would not be a millionaire. The 
only man who dreads being called a piker is the big bluff who 
wants people to think he is rich when he isn't." 

"Yes," said another, "and the only people who call one a 
piker are those who want to get his money." 
OSS 

There are some people in this world on whom civilization 
has no apparent effect, and the would-be missionary who at- 
tempts to effect a change in their misguided careers is apt more 
or less to be stung. 

A well-known business man undertook, the other day, to in- 
troduce Tom Wren, that doughty gumshoe, into the mysteries 
of the ice cream soda habit. "Have a drink, Tom?" he in- 
quired casually. 

"Sure thing," responded the policeman with alacrity, and 
followed the other's lead as he struck across the street. They 
proceeded along the block until they reached the entrance to 



July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



one of the city's candy palaces. "Come on in, Tom," invited 
the host. 

But Wren remained firm on the threshold. "Say," he pro- 
tested, "what in thunder are you going in there for?" 

"To buy you that drink, of course," answered the other, and 
catching the reluctant Wren by the shoulder, he marched him 
• in. They seated themselves at a dainty table and the policeman 
looked about him curiously. "Some swell dump this," he ob- 
served admiringly, and beamed graciously on the trim little 
maid who came to take their order. As she looked inquiringly 
from one to another, his host asked, "What'll you have Wren?" 
Wren scratched his head for a moment, and then ordered a 
Scotch highball. The little maid looked her dismay and the 
other came to the rescue. "We'll have," said he, "two vanilla 
ice cream sodas," while the city's guardian looked his supreme 
disgust. 

In the course of time the two cooling drinks arrived, each 
surmounted by a foamy cream-colored fluff of suds. Wren 
looked at the tall, slim glass askance, but determined to make 
the best of a very, very bad matter, grasped it firmly and lifted 
it high. 

"Here's how!" he said to his companion genially, and with 
one mighty breath sent the feathery fluff of suds across the aisle 
to the near destruction of a fashionable patroness' Parisian 
frock. Now it's all very well to be a missionary, but enough 
of a thing's enough, and the embarrassed host decided to go 
while the going was good. With abject apologies to the lady, 
he corraled his guest and escorted him gently but firmly to the 
door. 

"Now, old man," he said, "I think we'll go right over to the 
corner. There won't be any ladies there, and you can blow the 
foam as far as you please." 

II V * 

L. J. Rogers, known to his friends as "Jack" Rogers, a local 
artist, has come to the conclusion that economy is a matter of 
misdirected energy. The other night he and Mrs. Rogers spent 
the evening with a party of friends, and very foolishly allowed 
the last car to make its rounds without picking them up. They 
decided to walk over to Fillmore street, a distance of seven or 
eight blocks, and there catch the owl car which runs to within a 
few blocks of their home. 

Arrived at Fillmore street, they took up their watch for the 
welcome headlight. To add to their discomfort it had begun to 
rain, and umbrellaless they could spy no sign of a temporary 
shelter. Rogers thought of all the cuss words outside of the 
dictionary, but with due respect for his wife, kept them to him- 
self, a proceeding which very nearly brought on an attack of 
mental indigestion. After waiting for an hour and a quarter 
for Mr. Calhoun's conveyance to show up, the artist made up 
his mind to walk home, and with his spouse on his arm set 
forth through the cold, nasty drizzle. 

By the time they reached their own doorsteps, Rogers had 
walked a hole through the sole of his left shoe and consider- 
ably damaged his temper. As he dug down into his trousers 
pocket for his latch key, a horrible doubt assailed him, and as 
he sorted the numerous coins and keys which he found in the 
pocket, the doubt became a horrible certainty. He had failed 
to put the latchkey into his pocket on changing his clothes. He 
considered for a moment. The high gate leading into the side 
and back yards was locked securely from the inside, as Rogers 
has a very fine dog which he manages to keep coiraled, and 
there wasn't a window within reaching distance. 

The only thing left, he decided, was to force the lock of the 
front door. Bearing all of his weight upon it, he wrestled 



and tugged, but the door stayed put. Finally, in desperation, 
he gathered his strength for a final effort. With his hands 
securely holding the door knob he crouched for a rush, and like 
Samson, prepared to meet the universe. Now the front steps 
of the Rogers domicile are fashioned out of one of the new 
fangled compositions that look like stone but ain't, and when 
they're wet they're better for fancy skating than all the ice in 
Canada. 

As Rogers threw his weight against the obdurate door, his 
feet slipped from under him, and head and shoulders took a 
plunge through the heavy plate glass which is a feature of the 
entrance. The sound of the crash awoke the neighbors and 
brought the neighborhood cop on the run, and he it was who 
kindly boosted the Rogers' through the hole in their own door. 

"After this," said Rogers, "when we miss the last car we'll 
take a room down town. It's cheaper. A new plate glass win- 
dow cost me $18, a new hat $5, and a new overcoat $40, not to 
mention the repairs to my usually nice disposition." 

5 » b" 

They tell it of Kansas that the H. C. of L. has resulted in a 
federation of churches, consolidation enabling them to pay a 
comfortable living wage to one pastor instead of a pittance to 
several, as under the old system; and it works well, and nearly 
everybody likes it. This, of course, wasn't announced in open 
meeting. There religion and politics as such are carefully side- 
stepped, but on the side lines every woman talks of the thing 
that interests her most. What's the matter with Kansas ? She's 
alright ! But if you don't want to get your smooth, smug, happy 
habit of thinking things are alright or nearly right, all mussed 
up, don't start talking matters over with a Kansas delegate. 
She'll make you think so many things you never thought of 
before, so fast that it leaves you wondering how long you've 
been asleep. She began about the safe and sane Fourth — that 
we are to have in so modified a form they hardly recognize it — 
and after that I tagged along as well as I could through pure 
food law, and how it can be enforced, and the gains to every 
individual from it, and then everybody's right to plenty and 
what women can do in a commonsense way to insure his getting 
it, and the adjustment of wages and living expenses for the 
working woman, and a lot more ; but at the core of every topic 



Pears' 

Don't simply 
"get a cake of soap." 
Get good soap. Ask 
for Pears' and you 
have pure soap. 
Then bathing will 
mean more than 
mere cleanliness; it 
will be luxury at 
trifling cost. 

Sales increasing since 1789. 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 



was the back-to-the-land idea, which Kansas makes very at- 
tractive. I wonder, but I didn't like to ask, if that will be the 
disposition made of the superfluous preachers deposed by the 
consolidation. 

5 V S 

"The women of the East are so ignorant!" That's the gra- 
cious greeting accorded one of our Eastern guests out at the 
Biennial at Golden Gate Hall last Thursday night, and when 
her husband could — and did — chime in with the rejoinder, 
"Your women, I should judge, are remarkable!" it rounded out 
the incident just right, don't you think? 

The provocation was this : The couple are engaged in business 
requiring a natiun-wide market, and the manufacturing can be 
done in one place as well as in another. They are charmed with 
California, but before finally determining to locate with us, 
they wisely seek information at all times wherever it is likely to 
be found. She, being here with the Illinois delegation, and 
a charming woman of the world, introduced herself to this lady, 
who seemed to be one of those charged with the duty of making 
welcome the guests out here, by remarking: "We like Cali- 
fornia so very much we think of locating here," and the reply 
was : "You are certain to like it. For the first six months you 
are likely to be homesick, but after that you wouldn't live any- 
where else if you could. The climate is wonderful, and the 
women of California are so broad-minded and brilliant, while 
the women of the East are so ignorant." 

Now, that part about the California women is true, but did 
her line of talk demonstrate it? 

rs v s 

You've heard of the impending "clubbing" to be adminis- 
tered to some abuses in this town when the various women's 
clubs get to work again after vacation time is over. Well, the 
same sort of idea in another form is put before us by the first 
women police officer in the United States — Mrs. Wells of Los 
Angeles. She seems to regard her work as that of a pioneer in 
a necessary advance movement, and says she couldn't have ac- 
complished what she has but for the splendid backing and help 
she has had from both men and women. Also she says it will 
soon come to be recognized as necessary that women officers 
shall handle women's cases. Bet you the San Francisco police 
officers would all be in favor of that last, and under such pro- 
vision women offenders would receive less charity and more 
justice, which would tend to discourage them. 
o S 5 

These delegates ought to be encouraged to stay with us as 
long as possible: they don't seem to be able to think about 
money in iess than three figures. They raised eighty-five hun- 
dred dollars in something less than twenty minutes— by sub- 
scription—on Saturday. The second offering was of $25 by 
some club of California, and Mrs. Pennybacker asked her to 
wait, that they wished for the time being to consider nothing 
less than $100. And they didn't have to, either. From $100 to 
$500 the pledges rolled in so fast it was hard to keep track of 
them. New York's various clubs, however, totaled $1,300— 
and they never did get around to the less-than-a-hundred folks, 
but she promised that the matter should remain open. What 
we'd like to know is, what business has that sort of financiering 
with that sort of a name ? 

5 S" S 

You ought to go out to a session or so of the Biennial, 
and see for yourself how badly we need a proper auditorium! 
and then somebody start something. We've got two years and 
seven months between us and the opening of the Exposition, as 
scheduled, and several people— capable people— out of jobs 
at the present time. 



$72.50 



To Chicago and Return 
on the Peerless 

Golden State Limited 



A Transcontinental Delight 



This rate good on many days in 
June, July, August and September. 

Similar low rates to many other 
Eastern points. 

Return limit October 31st, 1912. 

Telephone or write our agents. 



Rock Island 
Southern Pacific 



July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



Working One's Way 
Through College. 



The young man or woman who con- 
templates combining a college course 
and self-support will be surprised to 
learn how practicable is that appar- 
ently hard task. In "Working One's Way Through College 
and University" (McClurg), Mr. Calvin Dill Wilson tells of a 
Yale student who regretted that his father did not compel him 
to pay his own way, as he would have obtained more good than 
he did when his way was paid. Commenting on this, Mr. Wil- 
son says : "This change of attitude toward the self-helpers is 
one of the most notable facts of present-day college life. Pos- 
sibly from the beginning of colleges in America, these institu- 
tions, or many of them, owned farms, on which certain of the 
students worked for tuition or board, or both. These 'poor' 
youths were in a category by themselves, and were 'looked 
down on' by those whose pockets were well lined by their 
fathers. A line of social difference was drawn between the 
farming pupils and those supported by their parents. Self- 
support now closes no doors of fraternities, athletics or respect. 
This surely is a healthy, normal condition in a republic. 

"The Yale bureau explicitly claims that 'the student who is 
working his way does not lose social standing therefor. A 
student who has to earn his living, and, in spite of that handi- 
cap, attains high rank of any sort, is especially regarded and 
applauded.' " 



In William Miller Collier's "At the 
Kings as Sportsmen. Court of His Catholic Majesty" 

(McClurg), the former American 
Minister to Spain dissipates the impression that when kings 
take part in sporting events it is customary for other competi- 
tors to let them win out of deference. Speaking of a pigeon 
shoot between King Alfonso of Spain and his neighboring mon- 
arch, King Carlos, in which the latter won out, the former 
minister writes: "You may be sure that the best man won, for 
kings are good sportsmen, and do not esteem those who, from a 
false sense of deference let them win; and the men with whom 
they contend know this fact. King Carlos was everywhere 
known as a good shot, and King Alfonso has the reputation of 
being one of the very best in Spain. The latter has himself 
won many prizes in all forms of sport, but has lost more than he 
has won. I remember once attending a meeting of the Yacht 
Club when he was to award the prizes that had been won in a 
regatta. It was somewhat amusing, when he announced that 
a certain money prize had been won by 'His Majesty the King,' 
to see him forthwith thrust it into his pocket." 



"Christ Among the Cattle," by Frederick Rowland Mar- 
vin, is now on the market in its sixth edition. It is one of the 
most effective anti-vivisection arguments extant, a classic of its 
kind, to be associated in its mission with "Black Beauty" and 
"Rab and His Friends." It is effective because written with the 
authority of personal knowledge trained to accurate observation 
through the autnor's education as a doctor of medicine. The 
use and abuse of vivisection and its supposed benefits to human- 
ity no one is better qualified than Dr. Marvin to set forth. 

Sherman, French & Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY FAIR. 

Santa Clara's Fourth National Industrial and Food Exposi- 
tion will be held September 5th to 15th inclusive. The automo- 
bile exhibit will be in a department of its own : enclosed, cov- 
ered and lighted. Automobile and motorcycle races will be run 
out on the Driving Park during September 7th, 8th, 9th and 
10th. Many prizes will be given for power vehicles in different 
classes. The live stock exhibit will be most interesting. A 
large number of horses, mules, cattle, hogs, sheep, goats, dairy 
stock and other animals will be in line. The fat-stock raisers 
alone will show droves of the finest meat of the land. Grand 
prizes will be given in every class. The machinery exhibit will 
be held in the open air. The grounds will be nicely spread with 
sawdust and shavings, and walled in with a high board fence 
and lighted with both electric and acetylene lights. 




An ^[Innovation in 
Swimming Apparel 



The 



Patented 



Bathing Suit 

(See Illustration) 
It is as easy to swim in as a 
man's suit; extremely simple and 
very stylish. Over 300 other dis- 
tinct styles for men, women and 
children. 




GRANT AVE. AT POST ST. 



The New Poodle Dog 

HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phones: Franklin 2960 Home C 6705 




Visitors Enjoy Dining at 

JULES Under MONADNOCK BUILDING 

Special 50c Luncheon Served in Ladies' Grill 
as well as Main Dining Hall 



i Si 

i H 

( H 



Sutter 1672 

omi C 3970 
Home C 4781. Hotel 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rlttman 
C. Lahederne 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTONI) 
RESTAURANT AND HOTEL NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner In the City with Wine. Si.oo. Banquet Halls anJ Private 

Dining Rooms. Music Every Evening. 
362 Oeary Street San Francisco 



Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods Furnishing Goods 

Notions White Goods Lace* 

N. C. corntr Bush and Saniomo Straati, tan Franclaca. 



Brushes 



Back to our old location, 623 Sacramento Street, between 
Kearny and Montgomery streets. 



With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 
to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders, Buckets, Chamois, 
Metal Polish, and Cleaning Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware. 
Call, write or telephone Kearny 6787. 

WM. BUCHANAN, 



Blake, Moffltt A Towne 



PAPER. 



37-45 First Stre- ., San Francisco. Phones: Sutter 2230; J 3221 

P'lvste Exchange Connecting all Departments. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 



Efe Mmi/tea? (flom&i. Mhw 



Eventualities in 
The Near East. 



It is not surprising that Great Britain 
should prepare for eventualities in 
the Near East, especially to antici- 
pate any scheme Russia may have 
in that region. The preparations that England is making is 
the adoption of a plan to establish new and stronger fortifica- 
tions at Malta, Gibraltar, Cypress and at other available places 
in the "Great Middle Sea," which was the ancient name of the 
Mediterranean. Italy has been notified of England's purpose, 
and finds no objection to it. The reason assigned for this move 
of England is Russia's announcement some time ago that she 
would feel more secure at home and occupy a more command- 
ing position in the family of nations when she had forced the 
Dardanelles and established a line of commercial ships be- 
tween the Black Sea and the Atlantic Ocean via the waters of 
the Mediterranean, wnich England interpreted to mean a Rus- 
sian fleet of warships sailing the same route at will. Italy 
would naturally approve of England's course because so long 
as Turkey is able to maintain an empire there will always be 
danger of Turkey's invasion of the Mediterranean and the 
coasts of Northern Africa, which would greatly weaken Italy's 
position. And, again, it is surmised that England is preparing 
to maintain a heavy land and naval force in the Mediterranean 
Sea region on account of the unrest in the Balkan States and 
in Crete, which may eventually result in a general war against 
the Sultan, to be followed by an attempt to divide the Ottoman 
nation. In that event, England's interests would require 
greater present naval and military strength in the Mediter- 
ranean country than she now has. However, Russia's military 
movements are so mysterious just now that it may be only a 
prudential policy which England has adopted for the Mediter- 
ranean. It is well known that Russia is adding to her army 
in Southern and Western Russia, in Persia and on the borders 
of Mongolia and Northern Manchuria, with the declared pur- 
pose of securing a permanent foothold on some of the coasts 
of the Far East. This in the face of the plans of suspicious 
Japan, and also of a British suspicion of an ultimate purpose 
of invading India either through Thibet or via the caravan 
routes of Persia. All this does not transfer the "danger spot" 
from the Near to the Far East, but it is making England and 
Germany unusually vigilant. The danger now is that Russia 
may become suspicious of the growing good feeling between the 
Kaiser and King George, and show her hand in a way that 
would likely be considered a dare. Anyway, Russia was never 
better prepared for war, only that she has no superior army or 
naval commanders, which fact the Czar's war and foreign offi- 
cers keenly realize and appreciate. 

Italy is more determined than ever that Turkey shall 

recognize her sovereignty over the province of Tripoli, and 
Turkey, on paper and diplomatic language, is as fully deter- 
mined to prolong the war until Italy yields and pays a round 
sum as indemnity for peace. It may be said that Turkey was 
never before so much in distress from national unrest and in- 
trigues of the Powers. The Sultan realizes that the hand of 
all Christian countries is against him, and that the days of the 
Ottoman empire are numbered. Internal disloyalty and foreign 
trickery, with the unreliable Young Turks playing him false, 
Turkey is in anything but a strong position to placate enemies 
or make good friends of the Balkan rulers. 

The German press continues to insist that Germany 

should not be bound by the American Monroe Doctrine in her 
relation to Brazil. A great deal of German money is waiting to 
be invested in Brazilian public and industrial improvements, 
and it wants plain sailing when it gets there. 

These figures give some idea of what the Panama Canal 

may do later on. During 1911, 4,968 vessels, with an aggre- 
gate tonnage of 18,234,794, passed through ti = Suez, which was 
an increase of 436 vessels and 1,742,896 tons o.-°r the previous 
year. 



The Republic of China is beginning to feel itself inde- 
pendent of all the world. Yuan has turned down a syndicate of 
foreign bankers because they were too exacting about the se- 
curity. They wanted a lien on the nation's salt industry, cer- 
tain mineral ranges, the customs revenue, and many other 
things. Yuan thinks China will soon be self-supporting, at 
least if the nation becomes pushed for ready money the capi- 
talists of China will advance the cash on the nation's bonds. 
They will also undertake the financing of certain military rail- 
roads which the army will need in case of a foreign war. At 
the same time, Yuan realizes that the Manchus are still con- 
spiring to reinstate the Manchu dynasty; also that Russia is 
sending troops to strengthen her hold in Mongolia and Man- 
churia, but he seems to think that the loyal people of the repub- 
lic are fully equal to any military or financial demands that 
may be saddled upon them. 

The ship owners of Europe do not seem to have much 

to talk about other than building boats to sail through the 
Panama Canal. Fully a dozen syndicates have been organized 
to sail the Pacific Ocean. The Pacific Coast of the United States 
is not likely to run short on ocean transportation service. 

The Kaiser has matured a plan by which the children of 

the working people of Berlin may have an outing at the seaside. 
He will pay all expenses out of his own pocket. About 1,500 
children will constitute the first group of little people. 

Italy is growing suspicious of Russia's friendship; at the 

same time, Great Britain and Italy are growing suspiciously 
friendly. The latter is likely to soon want British influence in 
the Turkish war affair. 

Just think of it! The production of gasoline the world 

over for the use of motor cars and automobiles is 2,200,000,000 
gallons per annum, and the production is increasing at an enor- 
mous rate. 

— — The situation in Mexico looks better for the government, 
but the rebels refuse to give in so long as there is an opportu- 
nity to rob and kill foreigners having a little money in their 
clothing. 

The British African union has decided that only Asiatics 

who can read and write will find that country at all hospitable. 
The public sentiment is against Asiatic immigration of any 
kind. 

A writer of British South Africa says the time will come 

when the Union will be the richest and strongest of the empire's 
colonies, even leaving Canada a long way behind. 

The troubles of France in Morocco seem to multiply. The 

Sultan is practically a prisoner, and the natives are giving their 
support to the leaders of the holy war crusade. 

British merchants and manufacturers are planning 

"boosting" tours to the severai colonies, for the one purpose of 
increasing their trade with the mother country. 

Germany is happy in the thought that she is admitted by 

the Powers to be the strongest nation in Europe, and a world 
power second to none. 

The Russian Douma has appropriated $200,000,000 to be 

expended in warship building and in transport ships. 



OLD 




SOUR MASH 

ourbori 



Charles Meinecke & Co. 



Agents Pacific Coast 



314 SACRAMENTO ST., S. F. 




PLyE>ASUR,E>'S WAND 

"We obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




THEATRE TIPS. 

COLUMBIA. — "Louisiana Lou" is a great musical comedy. 

ORPHEUM. — Extraordinary vaudeville. {Silver anniversary 
week.) 

ALCAZAR. — "Cabbages and Kings," a comedy that is mis- 
understood. 

CORT. — Last week of Durbar pictures. 

PANTAGES. — The Five Columbians is a spectacular novelty 
act. Bill good all through. 



"Cabbages and " at the Alcazar. 

If the Alcazar audiences are to decide the fate of "Cabbages 
and Kings," its future will remain in the garret. Its reception 
on Monday night suggests a change of title to "Cabbages and 
Lemons." 0. Henry's ability to invent unique situations, de- 
pict queer characters, and write dialogue at once whimsical 
and brilliant, is world famous, and Hugh Ford and Joseph Me- 
dill Patterson, who dramatized "Cabbages and Kings," were 
qualified by experience to perform their task competently. But 
San Franciscans who have the Alcazar habit are not bashful in 
criticising a play in their own peculiar way. The scenes in 

"Cabbages and ■ " are laid in Anchuria, an imaginary 

Central American republic, which has no extradition treaty with 
the United States, and serves as a safe refuge for fugitives 
from these shores. Into a colony of compatriots "who left 
their country for their country's good," is cast Frank Goodwin, 
a typical young New Yorker who has taken upon his shoul- 
ders the responsibility for a brother's crime. He acquires 
the management of a fruit-exporting corporation, attains politi- 
cal power in a community where revolution is ever brewing, and 
is getting along as prosperously as any homesick man could 
be expected to get along, when an abrupt upheaval of govern- 
ment plunges him into the series of exciting and droll in- 
cidents which constitute the play. His company is robbed of 
$100,000 by the deposed president of the republic, who de- 
camps with the treasury, and detectives engaged in the pursuit 
commit the blunder of mistaking him for an absconder from 
New York, who has just arrived with $100,000. 

For a sub-plot the playwrights adopted the central theme of 
another O. Henry story, "The World and the Door." The prin- 
cipal characters in this minor plot are a woman who erroneously 
and secretly believes she poisoned her husband, and a man 
who falsely and covertly imagines himself a murderer. They 
fall in love with each other. Their mutual disillusionment is 
one of the funniest things O. Henry ever conceived. 

"Cabbages and Kings" is sub-titled "A Comedy of Coinci- 
dences." In the first act coincidence creates tragedy; in the 
second it results less severely ; and in the third it causes many 
complications. 

Mr. Bennett was seen as Frank Goodwin, the hero, a charac- 
ter which brought out his most effective acting qualities; and 
Miss Morrison was nicely bestowed as Isabel Warfield, the 

heroine. 

• » » 

"Louisiana Lou" is Here. 

"Louisiana Lou" is in town. And if the Columbia Theatre 
audiences of this week be any criterion, its San Francisco en- 
gagement will rival in popularity its season's run in Chicago. 
It is a typically American musical comedy, full of go and 
ginger, and danced and sung by a company of refreshingly 
active and ambitious young people. Its music has lots of swing 
and jingle; its principals are prime entertainers, and its chorus 
is one of the most highly trained and efficient seen here since 
the good old days of the Tivoli. 

Barney Bernard has developed into a splendid comedian, 
unctuous, humorous and quick witted. Sophie Tucker has rr.ir- 
velously improved since her vaudeville period. Robert O'Con- 
nor is a capital type of the younger men in musical comedy 
shows. Bessie De Voie and Eleanor Henry are admirable girls 
as stage beauties. Helena Salinger and Harry Hanlon show 
their rich art. In a word, there is nothing but warm commenda- 
tion for the cast, for the resplendent costuming, for the pretty 
scenery, and finally for the chorus, which, like Caesar of old, 



came, saw and conquered a willing-to-be subjugated audience. 
"Louisiana Lou" easily reaches the high water mark as an even- 
ing's entertainment of imalioyed enjoyment. 
'* * * 

Excellent Vaudeville at Pantages. 

Excellent entertainment is provided at the Pantages Theatre 
this week, and in consequence the vaudeville house is crowded 
these afternoons and evenings with audiences that become en- 
thusiastic in praise of "The Five Columbians," as the Caro 
Miller family is called, in their spectacular singing and dancing 
act; Tallman, the wizard of the cue, in his pool performances; 
the Gordon Highlanders, in their novel musical act; Lew Pistel 
and O. H. Cushing, "the stranded minstrels," and the many 
other good features of the bill. 




Clara Blandick as "Cho-Cho-San" and Yne: Seabury as 
"Trouble," in David Belasco's production of "Madame Butter- 
fly" at the Orpheum next week. 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
i Cort. — The Paul J. Rainey African Hunt Pictures come to the 
Cort for a two weeks' engagement beginning to-morrow, Sun- 
day, afternoon. It is said that they are the most marvelous 
motion pictures ever taken. They have been exhibited at the 
Smithsonian Institute, and have attracted the attention of the 
world's greatest scientists. Mr. Rainey is a millionaire sports- 
man of Cleveland, Ohio, and has the reputation of being the 
most noted and fearless hunter of wild game in the world. The 
films to be shown at the Cort were made on Mr. Rainey's last 
expedition to Africa, and show the hunter and his associates 
hunting lions, tigers, leopards and other wild animals in the jun- 
gles of Africa. Many hair-breadth escapes from death are de- 
picted on the screen. 

Among other vievs a picture of a herd of zebras is shown, 
led by a wildebeest, which belongs to the gnu family. When 
driven out of his own tribe, the wildebeest is more powerful 
and seeks out a herd of zebra, appointing himself their leader. 

Mr. Rainey is shown capturing a wild dog, a feat that stands 
unparalleled in the annals of natural history. It is said that 
Hagenback, the famous animal dealer of Hamburg, after hav- 
ing spent much time and something like $10,000 in an endeavor 
to secure a specimen alive, gave up in despair and declared 
that no one would be able to take one of these animals. 

Another picture shows a herd of several hundred Thompson 
gazelles. They are declared by scientists to be the most timid 
creatures in the world. The photographs were taken but sev- 
enty-five yards distant from the animals. 

A baby rhinoceros that was captured is also seen. This baby 
hino is now in the London Zoological Gardens. 

"Pinafore" has been selected as the opening bill for the great 
Gilbert & Sullivan comic opera festival, which is scheduled to 
begin at the Cort on Sunday night, July 21st. "Patience," "The 
Mikado" and "The Pirates of Penzance" are the other operas 
that will be given during the four weeks' engagement. The 
Messrs. Shubert and William A. Brady, producers, will send 
the original New York cast from the Casino direct to the Cort 
Theatre for the notable season. Following is the correct cast 
that will interpret the operatic masterpieces : De Wolf Hopper, 
Blanche Duffield. Eugene Cowles, George J. MacFarlane, Kate 
Condon, Arthur Aldridge, Viola Gillette, Arthur Cunningham, 
Alice Brady, and Louis Barthel. 

• • * 

Columbia. — Following "Louisiana Lou" at the Columbia 
Theatre will appear the noted actor, James K. Hackett, who, 
since his famous success in "The Prisoner of Zenda," has not 
triumphed to such an extent as he has in his new play, "The 
Grain of Dust." Mr. Hackett's engagement will cover a number 
of weeks, and during his stay here will produce a new Booth 
Tarkington play called "The Man on Horseback." 

* * « 

Pantages. — For the week commencing Sunday afternoon no 
less a personage than Alick Lauder, brother of Harry Lauder, 
has been secured to head the program. Lauder comes direct 
from Australia, where he has been making a great hit, and this, 
his first American appearance, is looked forward to with great 
interest. Sig. C. Frizzo, the famous quick change artist of 
Rome, will also be new here, presenting his transformation 
sketch, "Eldorado," in which he impersonates nine entirely 
different characters and gives a complete theatrical entertain- 
ment. Lordy's dog actors and acrobats, direct from London via 
Australia, will appear here for the first time, offering their 
novelty skit, "The Burglar's Fate," elaborately staged and acted 
with extraordinary canine vim and intelligence, and introducing 
an elaborate stage setting. The Marmeen Four, clever singers 
and instrumentalists, including a couple of pretty girls, will 
offer a melange of musical oddities, and the Lessos, whose jug- 
gling feats have won them fame all over the world, will present 
their entirely original act. Those musically inclined will ex- 
perience a treat in the violin playing of Henri Kubelik, nephew 
of the famous Jan Kubelik, who is now making his first Ameri- 
can tour. Kubelik's tone and technique are said to be remark- 
able. Jones and Mayo, young men whose character comedy 
conversations are said to be unusually clever and funny, and 
Sunlight Pictures, showing the latest novelties in the motion 
photographic world, will complete a bill which certainly looks 
tempting. 



A lcazar.— Richard Bennett's farewell week at the Alcazar 
commences next Monday evening with a revival of Charles 
Klein's great play of love and finance, "The Lion and the 
Mouse," in which the clever actor scored one of his earlier suc- 
cesses. In the cast with him will be Mabel Morrison as Shirley 
Rossmore (her au revoir role), in which she made a pro- 
nounced hit last season at the Alcazar, and the full strength of 
the stock company appropriately bestowed. 

Louis Bennison will again impersonate John Burkett Ryder, 
in which character he won distinctive recognition when "The 
Lion and the Mouse" was last presented at the Alcazar. A 
sumptuous pictorial production is promised. 



Orpheum. — David Beiasco's production of "Madame Butter- 
fly," will be the Orpheum headline attraction next week. Mr. 
Belasco has given this presentation, the first he has ever made 
for vaudeville, the best of his mastery of stage craft. Clara 
Blandick, a clever and popular young actress, has been selected 
for the part of Cho-Cho-San, and Earl Ryder will enact the 
role of Sharpless, the American Consul. The others of the 
company are George Wellington, Edgar Norton, Frank L. 
Davis, Marie Hudspeth, Edith Higgins, Ynez Seabury, Forest 
Seabury and Arvid Paulson. 

It would be difficult to classify Brown and Blyer, who come 
next week, except in their own terms, "Just Entertainers." These 



Alcazar Theatre 



O'Farrell Street. 
Bet Powell and Mason. 
Phones: Kearny I; Home C 4456. 
Belasco & Mayer, Owners and Managers. 



Monday evening, July Stli. and throughout the week. Farewell ap- 
pearand? of RICHARD BENNETT and Mabel Morrison in Ohas. 
Klein's great play. 

THE LION AND THE MOUSE. 

Prices— Night, 25c. to $1; mat., 25c. to 50c. Matinee Thursday, 
Saturday, Sunday. 

To Follow— BESSIE BARRISCALE in "The Rose of the Rancho." 



Cort Theatre 



Leading attractions only. 
Ellis and Market streets. 
Phone— Sutter 2460. 



This afternoon and to-night. Last times of the DURBAR in KINE- 

MACOLOR. 

Beginning to-morrow (Sunday) matinee. Mats, daily at 2:30. 

Nights at 8:30. 

PAUL J. RAINEY'S AFRICAN HUNT, 

The most marvelous motion pictures ever taken. 

Prices— 25c. and 50c. 



Pantages' Theatre 

Week of Sunday. July 7th. 



Market street, opposite Mason. 



INTERNATIONAL ATTRACTIONS. 

ALICK LAUDER, Brother of HARRY LAUDER, In Character 
Songs and Studies; FRIZZO. World's Greatest Quirk Change Artist; 

MARMEEN FOUR, in a Melang Musical oddities; LORDY'S 

DOG ACTORS and ACROBATS; HENRI KUBELIK. Distinguished 
rian Violinist; THE LESSOS, Famous Jugglers; JONES and 
MAYO, Comedy Conversationalists, and Sunlight Pictures. 
Mat Dally at 2:30; Nights at 7:15 and 9:15. Sunday and Holidays, 
Mats, at 1:30 and 3:30. Nights continuous from 6:30. Prices — 10c. 
20c, 30c. 



Orph 



eWYYL O'Farrell Street, 
vwiiv BM Stockton and powait 

Safest and most magnificent theatre in America. 

Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

MARVELOUS VAUDEVILLE. 
DAVID BELASCO presents MADAME BUTTERFLY, a one-act 
play, by David Belasco, based on John Luther Long's Japanese 
Story; BROWN and BLYER, "Just Entertainers"; O'MEERS SIS- 
TERS & CO., 3 Girls on the Wire; HONORS & LE PRINCE. Fi 
Pantomimic Gymnasts; RAY L. ROYCE. in Eccentric Character 
Sketches: GRAHAM MOFFAT'S SCOTTISH PLAYERS; FIVE 
PIROSCOFFIS; NEW DAYLIGHT MOTH IN PICTURES. Last 
week— Great Laughing Hit. GEORGE EVANS - . "The Honey Bow'™" 
Evening prices. 10c, 25c, 50c. 75c Box seats. $1. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays), 10c, 25c, 50c. Phones Douglas 70- 
Home C 1570. 

Columbia Theatre BsjSjjjur- = 

GottlOb. Marx & Co., Manager,. 

Nightly, including Sundays. Matinees Wednesdays and Saturdays.. 

For two more weeks. The great La Salle Theatre, Chicago, success, 

"LOUISIANA LOU," 

The musical comedy with real fun and jingly music. BARNEY 
BERNARD. SOPHIE TUCKER and others. 

Bargain matinee. Wednesdays, 25c, 50c. 75c, $1. Evenings and 
Saturday matinee. 25c to $1.50. 

Coming— JAMES K. HACKETT in "The Grain of Dust." 



July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



two young men have conceived an act which has the great merit 
of being entertaining throughout. 

A trio of pretty, vivacious and symmetrical girls, bearing the 
name of the O'Meers Sisters and company, will furnish a most 
attractive novelty in wire performances. 

Honors and Le Prince, a team of French acrobats, and recent 
arrivals from Paris, will make their first appearance in this city. 

Ray L. Royce, a splendid actor of exceptional versatility, and 
an extraordinary gift of mimicry, well and favorably known 
here, will introduce his artistic sketches of eccentric characters. 

Next week will conclude the engagements of Graham Mof- 
fat's Company of Scottish Players in Mr. Moffat's own sketch, 
"The Concealed Bed;" The Five Piriscoffis, and also of George 
("Honey Boy") Evans, the peerless monologist, who is con- 
vulsing the audiences with laughter at every performance, and 
making the biggest kind of a hit. 



HIDDEN HERITAGE. 

I am not half so poor as they 
Who have great wealth save for to-day. 
Beneath this time an undertime, 
My hidden heritage sublime; 
Beneach this world an underworld, 
With mass and shards above it hurled. 

I always knew that it was there, 
But how descend it, how to dare? 
I always knew my noontide draft 
In its deep well had darkly laughed; 
How nightly Sleep, that shepherd sooth, 
There led the dream-flocks of my youth. 

I knew because each joy of mine 

Had under-grief the more divine ; 

And, ah, because no sorrow pressed 

So hard but that it also blessed! 

With up-sent dew my tears were pearled — 

Beneath this world such underworld! 

I always knew that it was there, 

And did this solid world upbear; 

So, were I weak, its voices rose, 

"Fear not; strength rushes in thy blows." 

And, were I witless and unread, 

Some nether sun its light upshed. 

I always knew, I know, 'tis there ; 
But how to reach it, how to dare, 
The shards that hide it how upheave. 
And to its heart full pathway cleave, 
As one who must descend, not climb. 
Unto a heritage sublime! 

— Edith M. Thomas in Century. 



People who love to dine well patronize the Techau Tav- 
ern, Market and Powell streets, because it is the place, par 
excellence, where those with discriminating taste gather with 
their friends to enjoy the fine music, superior service, choice 
viands and distinctive atmosphere which attend social refine- 
ment and good living. 



The Nationalists of Egypt have quit trying to emit 

great Britain's rulers. 



The Building Trades strike in Los Angeles was declared 

off on June 27th, without having accomplished anything, except 
to throw a lot of union men out of employment, and to antago- 
nize the small contractors who have heretofore been willing 
to maintain open shop, but who are now absolutely non-union. 

ALL SUMMER RESORTS 
serve Italian-Swiss Colony wines to their guests. TIPO (red or 
white) is especially popular. 

Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



DOMINICAN 
COLLEGE 



SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIFORNIA 



4* & .4* 



A Boarding School for Young Women, conducted by the Slaters 
of St. Dominic, situated In Magnolia Valley and protected by the 
lofty hills of the Tamalpals Range. Fifty minutes by boat and 
train from San Francisco. Climate unsurpassed for healthfulness. 
(deal condition for scholastic work. 

Classical, Scientific and Commercial Courses. Specially organized 
departments of Music, Art and Domestic Economy. Well equipped 
Library and Laboratory. Accredited by the University of California. 



PRIVATE INSTRUCTION ONLY 

Shorthand —Typewriting — Bookkeeping 

Munson School of Shorthand 

820 to 827 Whitney Building 

133 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 3671 LUCILE SMITH, Principal 



Miss Harker's School PA c L A ? IF0 A R ^ 

Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year begins August 15th. 
Catalogue upon application. 



MANZANITA HALL 

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA. 

Makes a specialty of preparing boys and young men for entrance 
to the universities. The location adjacent to Stanford University 
and to Palo Alto, a town of remarkable culture, makes possible a 
school life of unusual advantages and opportunities. 

Twentieth year opens Aug. 27, 1912. For catalogue and specific 

information, address »._.-..»— u .. ■> * 

W. A. SHEDD, Head Master. 










HEALDS 

BUSINESS COLLEGE 

425McAllisterSt.San Francisco. 






Each leads to a Lucrative Position 









A. W. Be<t 



Allca Baft 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1626 California Street 



Ufa CI «—»• 

Day and Nurht 



Uluatrattn* 
Sketohlns 
Pain tine 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 






fyomu 




While the clubwomen are discussing the true inwardness of 
the outwardness of the psychic income of the unearned incre- 
ment, the society women are plying their needles and their 
tongues, reading, playing bridge, enjoying athletic stunts, and 
not fagging themselves out over the perplexities of the age 
from conserve tion to medical freedom. Everywhere that one 
meets the society woman to-day she has her work bag. This 
month I have seen her with her needlework on the porches of 
Del Monte, Santa Barbara, Tahoe, and I have even been amazed 
by the vision of Mrs. Jack Spreckels putting in a few extra 
stitches against the granite background of Yosemite Valley. It 
is the age of indefatigable needlework for the smart set. One 
sees them plying the needle on the suburban trains and boats, 
during the "dummy" period at bridge, and while riding about 
in a limousine. 

Which brings me to the point the needle has in this para- 
graph. Two young women, dashing matrons, who are witty, 
clever and unusually well dressed, have narrowly escaped a 
summons to court to show v/hy their partnership should not be 
dissolved. 

You didn't know that they were in partnership? Neither 
did I, until yesterday, and there are not more than two or three 
others who share this "cross your heart and hope to die never 
to tell" secret. Now that it has not sprung a leak in open court, 
there is a chance that it has been sufficiently well plugged up 
not to drain off over the public highway of gossip. But just 
between ourselves, let's share a little of the secret. 

Both young women are married to successful young men, but 
as incomes are measured in Burlingame, their margin of ex- 
penditure looks like a ripped seam in an overtight bank account 
every time they indulge in the luxuries that are mere necessi- 
ties in the millionaire set. One young matron will someday 
inherit a great deal of money from her mother, but meanwhile 
mother has a firm grasp on the dollars. The other young matron 
has not a large inheritance pot at the end of the rainbow. Both 
can do anything in the lines of accomplishment laid down for 
fashionable ladies, and they can do a number of other things 
not chalked off in the favored field of ladylike accomplishment. 
For example, they do the fine needlework which is so ubiquitous 
these days, but they can also make real clothes, clothes that 
are chic, clothes that have an air of distinction and command 
attention for their daring and elegance. Two years ago they 
discovered a little house-to-house dressmaker, from Vienna, via 
Chicago, and with her collaboration, at $2.50 per day, they man- 
aged to produce some of the most stunning evening gowns that 
draped the background of that winter. Every one wanted to 
know the name of the dressmaker, and finally the two young 
matrons put their heads together, and two large and well 
modeled business bumps coming thus in contact produced a 
business idea that was large and luminous. 

They put the little house-to-house dressmaker in business in 
a down-town office building. I am told that they invested about 
$2,000 in the venture. The contract provided that they were to 
enjoy half the net profits from the business, and so it went 
for a year, the young society women getting their capital back 
in six months, and then enjoying a neat little income that kept 
them in silk stockings and sixteen button gloves and French 
laundry. Of course they did not do any of the actual work of 
the shop. The little dressmaker only had to put in about 
eighteen hours a day with her eight-hour employees, while the 
young society women wore the choicest product of the shop and 
drummed up trade, no one suspecting their interest in the 
business. 

The other month a cousin from Vienna, via two years tailor- 
ing experience in Chicago, came out, and when his business 
bump came into contact with that of cousin-dressmaker's, il 
made hers look like an obscure dent. He turned and twisted 
his argument until it looked like a Vienna pretzel, and finally 
she was convinced that she had for the paltry sum of $2,000 



PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street in the center of the city. 
Take any Market Street Car from the Ferry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The most beautifully situated of any City Hotel 
in the world. 

Take the Sacramento Street Cars from the Ferry 
Two Great Hotels Under the Management of the 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



contracted to give away half of her earning capacity, and the 
result of it was that lawyers were called into consultation, a 
suit threatened, and a compromise effected whereby the young 
society matrons were relieved of their silent partnership in a 
prosperous dressmaking establishment. 
© © © 
A number of Englishwomen, like Lady Duff Gordon, and a 
few Eastern women, have openly gone into trade, but the San 
Francisco society woman, when the necessity of a living wage 
pinches her resources, does not turn to dressmaking or milli- 
nery, although there are a number of society women here who 
have a positive talent for sartorial expression and sufficient 
business sagacity to make a success of the venture. Some years 
ago the Draper girls were authoritatively credited with being 
sponsors for some fetching creations in millinery which were 
sold at private sale at the Fairmont Hotel under a New York 
name. The venture was not a financial success, and the most 
convincing reason given at the time was that the anonymous 
sale and the mysterious air enveloping it adversely affected the 
sale, whereas if it had been conducted openly by the real spon- 
sors, it would have been a success. The Draper girls have 
since married and are confining their millinery inspirations to 
their own heads, or bringing them down, without profit, upon 
the heads of their dearest intimates. 

see 

Constance de Young Tobin has a genius for pinning a single 
feather against a background of straw, and only those who have 
tried it realize that it takes a highly-developed wrist to ac- 
complish this feat. Whenever her friends flatter her about 
her histrionic ability and assure her that she would have made 
a great success on the stage, she laughingly insists that her only 
real, glorified talent is for bonnet making. Mrs. Fred McNear 
often makes a hat before breakfast, alters a gown before lunch- 
eon, and then gives away the rest of the day as a present to 
social exactions. Indeed, there are a number of young women 
who could market their ability in this line if they were forced 
into the market. Not being forced into the market, the two 
young matrons who so quietly prospered in a dressmaking ven- 
ture are not apt to start out in open competition with the little 
dressmaker who forced dissolution of partnership. But if they 
did engage in the competition, they could unquestionably glide 
to the top where most people have to push their way. 
© © © 

Mr. E. W. Hopkins has recorded a gift to his new daughter- 
in-law, Mrs. Sam Hopkins, giving her a house and a strip of 
land adjoining his own estate. The home will stand in the name 
of Elysse Schultz Hopkins, whereas the touring car, which was 
another gift from Mr. Hopkins, was bestowed upon Sam as his 
special property. Young Hopkins was promised a touring car 
if he would work for a degree at Stanford University, but he 
found the premium too irksome, and contented himself with 
driving father's car. When he took the degree of B. D. S. 
(Benedict Domestic Science) father decided that that was as 
good as any of the alphabet given away at the university, and 
that just as much sound education was in store for him, so he 
gave him the touring car of his heart's desire. 

There will be two houses a-building on the Hopkins estate, 
for the Cheever Cowdins are to have a home there which was 
also the gift of Pere Hopkins to his daughter, Florence. The 
Cowdins are now honeymooning in the East, and will jaunt over 
Europe, but their home is not to be on the Atlantic shore, as re- 
ported. Young Cowdin will go into business here, much to the 
delight of the large Hopkins clan and their friends. 



July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



Miss Jennie Crocker has been trousseau buying with the 
unlimited wealth at her command, but she is wearing very sim- 
ple clothes on her expeditions to town. The other day she 
and her sister-in-law, Mrs. Templeton Crocker, were buying 
hair brushes at the toilet department of one of the fashionable 
shops. Miss Crocker had on a soft, slinksy satin frock of such 
a dark purple shade that it looked almost black, enlivened 
only by some tiny, fascinating little white buttons. Her hat 
was a small turn-down affair, not loud, in fact it could not speak 
above a whisper. Mrs. Templeton Crocker was wearing a navy 
blue fancy tailor suit, with some dark purplish-red Oriental 
embroidery enriching the collars and cuffs. Her hat, too, was 
quiet and inconspicuous. 

At a near-by counter stood a woman who recognized them, 
and casually remarked, "There are the Crockers!" 

A large, luxurious, willow beplumed woman, who overheard, 
immediately started, sails all set, for a nearer view of "the 
Crockers." In her path was the veiling counter, and she dam- 
aged it only to the extent of sending one mirror crashing to the 
floor, likewise depositing a pile of "complexion veils" on the 
floor, and catching her bag in one lace veil which she dragged 
along with her to the counter where Mrs. Templeton Crocker 
was weighing the advantages of a stiff brush over a soft brush. 
When the large, luxurious person reached this counter she 
seemed to have lost her bearings, and, flushed and perplexed, 
she queried of one of the unengaged girls behind the counter, 
"Oh, dear; where are the Crockers? Where have they gone? 
I did want to get a good look at them. Some one said they 
were here. They say Mrs. Templeton Crocker looks like some 
French beauty, but I can't say her pictures look very pretty. 
Oh, there they go toward the elevator!" And she fled after two 
conspicuously dressed young girls who had been purchasing 
perfume a moment before, leaving "the Crockers" to finish 
their cogitation about brush values without showing by so 
much as the flicker of an eyelid that they were the genuine 
quarry. 

6> 8 © 

The many friends of Mr. George Bulloch, Jr., will be pleased 
to learn that he has at last deserted the ranks of the bachelors 
and entered the matrimonial state. At the St. Mark's Hotel, in 
Oakland, this week, occurred the marriage of Miss Aillene Mc- 
Kinnon to Mr. George Bulloch, Jr., of Oakland. Miss McKinnon 
is the beautiful and accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
J. L. McKinnon, of Berkeley, and Mr. Bulloch is one of the ris- 
ing and most popular rubber tire men of California, being Oak- 
land representative of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, 
of Akron, Ohio. It is said that Mr. Bulloch, since locating in 
this vicinity from Los Angeles, has made a remarkable record 
for himself in the interests of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber 
Company, and it is believed that the prospects of this young 
couple are exceptionally bright. The ceremony was private, 
being witnessed by only a few close friends of the contracting 
parties, the best man being Mr. Charles Thompson. 



DEL MONTE SOCIAL ITEMS. 

Mrs. George H. Howard motored down from San Mateo to 
visit her mother, Mrs. Henry Schmiedel, who lives at the Fair- 
mont, bringing Master Henry and George H., the 3d, for 
an extended stay. Mrs. Schmiedel likes Del Monte, but needs 
the society of the prize youngster, George H. the Third. 

Mrs. V. K. Maddox, with her maid, and Knox Maddox, are 
enjoying ten days of Del Monte's hospitality, while Mr. Mad- 
dox is enjoying his usual outdoor pursuits. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert B. Gee have been visiting her mother, 
Mrs. E. P. Redding, and their delightful visit will continue until 
late in the month. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker Whitney, Sr., who are spending the 
summer within Del Monte's portals, are entertaining Miss 
Chadwick, of New York, and Mrs. Boor of England, both of 
whom express much enthusiasm over the scenery throughout the 
Western United States. 

Mrs. R. P. Schwerin, whose husband is one of the San Fran- 
ciscans that has helped to turn the wheels of commerce in the 
right direction, with Miss Schwerin and Richard Schwerin are 
enjoying a few weeks with friends at Del Monte before and af- 
ter the tournament. 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Turkish Baths 

12th Floor 

Ladies' Hair Dressing Parlors 

2d Floor 

Care 

White and Gold Restaurant 

Lobby Floor 

Electric Grill 

Barber Snop 

Basement, Geary Street Entrance 



Under the management of James Woods 



HOTEL SUTTER 



Cor. Sutter and Kearny 



San Francisco 



In the center of retail and wholesale shopping 

district. 
New, modern, up-to-date and flre-proof, 
260 rooms— single or en suite. Rates SI. 60 

per day and upwards. 
Take any taxicab from Ferry or Railway 

depots at expense of the hotel. 
Cater to patrons of the famous Occidental 

and Lick Hotels of ante- 1906 days. 

Excellent Cafe in connection Merchants Lunch 50c 

Table d'Hote Dinner with Wine $1.00 



HOTEL MONTGOMERY 



Fireproof 



San Jose's Newest Hotel 



Rates $1.00 and up 
F. J. McHENRY, Manager 



European Plan 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

DEL MONTE 

PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL 

PACIFIC GROVE 

Arrange to spend your summer months on the Monterey Peninsula. 
No spot in California offers so much as does Del Monte. Monterey and 
Pacific Grove with its beautiful mountain scenery, drives, and par- 
ticularly the unexcelled grassy course of the 

Del Monte Golf & Country Club 

Both hotels under the same management. 
Write for rates, literature, etc., to 

H. R. WARNER, Del Monte, California 



STEVENS 
DURYEA 



For supreme satisfaction In tour- 
ing: the STEVENS-DURYEA SIX. 
With its "unit power plant" 
mounted on "three points," It has 
the maximum of power efficiency, 
the minimum of friction and strain, 
and a motor flexibility that Is 
truly delightful. 



"SIX" PACIFIC MOTOR CAR 
CO., Distributors 
Golden Gate Avenue at Polk Street 
San Francisco. Cal. 




1 ■ , „ , • IZZZ 



SOGlAlrPERSGML ITEMS 



■ ■ :: : '- . ■ 



'$%$$$$£%&. 




Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butlons must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear In the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 

CAUBU-ROUSSEIATJ. — Announcement of the engagement of Miss Irene 
Caubu and Oliver M. Rosseau has been made by Mr. and Mrs. Pierre 
Caubu, parents of the bride elect. Miss Caubu is the youngest daugh- 
ter of the family. Mr. Rousseau is a son of Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Rous- 
seau, and is an architect. No date has been set for the wedding. 

HATES-ROTH. — The engagement is announced of Miss Mildred Hayes to 
Alraon E. Rcth of Stanford University. Miss Hayes is the daughter of 
J. O. Hayes, editor of the San Jose Mercury, and a niece of Congress- 
man Hajes. The marriage will occur in the early fall, and their homo 
will be mac'e in San Francisco. 

POSTLEWAITE-MIZNER.— The engagement of the Reverend Henry Wat- 
son Mizner and Miss Eleanor Pustlewaite of St. Louis is announced. 
Dr. Mizr.er, who is pastor of one of the Episcopal churches in St. 
Louis, visited here for some time last winter. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

AUNE-PARTINGTON. — The marriage of Miss Inger Aune and John A. 
Partington is set for July 10th. It will take place at the home of the 
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Pedar Aune, in Waller street. 

WEDDINGS. 

PEERS -NEW HALL. — The wedding of Miss Jennie Peers and Edward 
Whiting Newhall, Jr., took place al noon on Tuesday at Wallingford. 
Connecticut. 

LUNCHEONS. 

FRANK. — Mrs. Marshall Frank was hostess recently at an elaborate 
luncheon. It was given at the St. Francis, and there were sixteen 
guests. 

HERTZ. — Mrs. Louis Hertz entertained at luncheon on Monday in honor 
of the visiting officers of Patrons, who are delegates to the Federation 
of Women's Clubs. 

HEUTER. — Mrs. Ernest N. Heuter will be hostess at a luncheon party in 
Mill Valley on July 12th, in honor of Miss Olga Jungbluth, the fiancee 
of Mr. Harold Broughton. 

HILL. — Mrs. Robert Potter Hill was hostess at a luncheon on Monday at 
which she entertained the members of the Nevada delegation to the 
Federation of Women's Clubs. 

KEENET. — Miss Mullen, who is visiting here from her home in Washing- 
ton, D. C, was the special guest at a luncheon recently given by 
Mrs. James W. Keeney at her home In Buchanan street. 

MEYER. — Mrs. Frank Somers was guest of honor at a luncheon given 
at the home of the Misses Clga and Alice Meyer at Menlo Park lately. 

MORROW. — Mrs. Wm. H. Morrow and Miss Arabella Morrow entertained 
some of their friends at a luncheon at the Town and Country Club 
recently, to meet their guest. Miss Virginia Walsh, of Los Angeles. 

TEAS. 
HULEN. — Mrs. Vard Houghton Hulen was hostess at a tea at the Town 

and Country Club recently, asking a number of her friends to meet 

Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker and Mrs Henry Fall. 
MORROW. — Miss Arabella Morrow gave a tea recently at the Keystone to 

meet Miss Virginia Walsh of Los Angeies. 
ROMAINE. — Mrs. William Romaine was hostess at a prettily appolnl 

at the Fairmont recently, at which she entertained in honor of Mrs. 

Scottford and the members of the Chicago delegation. 
STORY.— Mrs. William C. Story of Washington. D. C, gave a tea at the 

Palace Monday afternoon, at which she entertained many friends. 
TOBIN. — Mrs. Mary A. Tobin entertained at a tea recently In honor of 

Mrs. A. Loughborough and Miss Bessie Zane. 

DINNERS. 
BREEDEN. — Mrs. Henry Clarence Breeden entertained at an el rato 

dinner party given Tuesday evening at the Burlingame Club. There 

were about seventy guests at the affair. 
DE TRISTAN. — Viscomte and Viscomtesse Philippe de Tristan entertained 

informally at dinner recently at their San Mateo home, "Minnehaha." 
HEYNEMANN. — Mrs. Alexander Heynemann entertained at an informal 

dinner recently at her home in Buchanan street. 
JOHNSON. — Major and Mrs. J. C. Johnson were dinner hosts at their 

attractive quarters at the Presidio recently. 
MORROW. — Miss Arabella Morrow was hostess at an informal dinner 

recently, entertaining in honor of Miss Virginia Walsh, of Los Angeles. 
WELLS. — Mrs. George Wells was hostess at a handsome dinner recently 

In honor of Mrs. Marguerite Hanford, who has sailed on the Mongolia 

for the Orient. 

HOUSE PARTIES. 
BRYANT. — Dr. and Mrs. Edgar R. Bryant entertained a jolly house party 

over the Fourth at their home In Los Gatos. 
COFFIN. — Mrs. Horace Coffin Is entertaining a house party at her home 

in Mill Valley. 
HOOPER. — Miss Katherine Hooper entertained a house party at her 

home in Carme'-by-the-Sea recently. 
MARTIN. — Mr. and Mrs. Walter Martin have been entertaining at a series 

of week-end house parties at "Stag's Leap." 
NEWHALL.— Mr. and Mrs. William Mayo Newhall entertained a house 

party over July 4th. 



VAN FLEET. — Miss Julia Van Fleet entertained at a large house party, 
given over the Fourth of July. The country residence of the Van 
Fleets at Inverness was the scene of the affair, the guests remaining 
in the country over the week-end. 

WILSON. — Mrs. Russell Wilson entertained a house party over the week- 
end at her home in Hillsborough. 

PICNICS. 

HELLMANN. — Miss Mary Heliman was hostess at a beach picnic last 
Saturday afternoon, at which she entertained sixteen guests. The 
affair was chaperoned by Mrs. George H. Hellmann. 

CARDS. 

FULTON. — Miss Anna Fulton gave an enjoyable bridge party recently at 
the home of her brother, Captain James Fulton, at Fort Winiield Scott. 

HUFF. — Mrs. Charles Huff, the wife of Lieutenant Huff, U. S. N., was 
hostess at an enjoyable bridge party recently at her home in Sixth 
avenue. 

TOWLE. — Miss Kate Towle entertained a group of friends at bridge re- 
cently at her attractive San Rafael home. 

MOTORING. 
BROWN. — Dr. and Mrs. Philip King Brown and Mr. and Mrs. Luther J. 

Holton have left in an automobile for Oregon. 
BUCK. — Mrs. John Buck, Sr., accompanied by her daughter, Miss Buck, 

and also Mrs. John Buck, Jr., and Mrs. Walter E. Buck, have left 

for Etna Springs, going by automobile. 
BRESSE. — Mrs. Eugene Bresse, Miss Meta McMahon and Miss Franc 

Pierce are enjoying an automobile trip through the southern part of 

the State. 
FLOOD. — Mr. and Mrs. James L. Flood, little Miss Emma Flood and Miss 

Barbara Donohoe, left In their motor for Yosemite. 
GALPIN. — Mrs. Philip Galpin, Miss Julita Galpin and Miss Dorothy Dean 

have left for a motor trip through Lake County. 
GREENEBAUM. — Mr. and Mrs. Leon Greenebaum are planning a motor 

trip to Southern Oregon, where they will spend a month in the 

picturesque Rogue River country. 
HOUGHTON.— Mr. and Mrs. Edward Houghton, Miss Elise Houghton and 

Mrs. Hippoiite Dutard, recently enjoyed a motor trip through Lake 

County. 
McCORMICK.— Mi. and Mrs. Charles McCormlck and the Iatter's sister, 

Mrs. Horatio Lawrence, have left for a motor trip through Lake 

County. 
SUTRO. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sutro have left for Tahoe. going by 

motor. 
VOLKMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. George Volkman and Miss Johanna Volkman 

have left in their automobile for the Yosemite. 

RECEPTIONS. 

McGAW. — Mrs. John McGaw was hostess at a leception given recently to 
meet the visiting members of the Colonial Dames. 

VON STJTTNER.— The Baroness von Suttner and Mrs. Percy Penny- 
backer were the guests of honor at a reception at the Century Club. 

VON SCHROEDER.— The Misses Janet and Edith von Schroeder are en- 
tertaining a merry house party at their ranch in San Luis Obispo. 

THEATRE PARTIES. 

HEDGES. — Mrs. Walton Hedges entertained at a theatre party recently 

in honor of Mr. and Mrs. George Carr. 
DANCES. 
GRAHAM. — Miss Ethel Graham, the daughter of Judge and Mrs. Graham, 

was hostess at a delightful birthday dance at her home in Vallejo 

street recently. 

ARRIVALS. 
BACON. — Miss Mabel Bacon, who has been in Japan for the past year, 

has arrived in San Francisco, where she will be the guest of friends 

for several days. 
BAILEY. — After an extended sojourn in New York, Miss Grace Bailey has 

returned to San Francisco. She is the guest of her sisters, Miss Alice 

and Miss Dolly Bailey, at their home in Devisadero street. 
MIDDLE. — Colonel John Biddle Is here from Washington, D. C, visiting 

friends. He will remain about a month. 
BREUNER. — Mr. and Mrs. John Bieuner and the children have returned 

to their home In this city after a three weeks' visit in Shasta Springs. 
BORDEN. — Miss Juliet Borden Is spending a few days in San Francisco, 

having come up from her home in Los Angeles. 
BRYANT. — Mrs. Arthur H. Bryunt and her young son have arrived from 

the Philippines, and will remain for six or eight months. 
BULL. — Mrs. Alpheus Bull and Mrs. Edward Everett have returned from 

Yosemite, where they sp^nt two weeks. 
CUNNINGHAM. — Mrs. James Cunningham and her daughter. Miss Sara, 

are up from Santa Barbara for a few days, and are at the Talace. 
DEADY. — Mrs. Mary Thompson Deady has returned to her home in 

Jackson street after a ten days' visit with relatives in Palo Alto. 
DIXON. — Mr. and Mrs. Maynard Dixon and their little daughter have ar- 
rived from their home in New York, and have taken apartments at 

The Gables in Clay and Larkin streets. 
FEE. — After a visit as the guest uf Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale in Shasta 

Springs, Miss Marcia P'ee has returned to her home in Buchanan 1 

street. 
FRICK. — Mrs. Euclid Frlck has returned from the Y'osemlte, where she 

has spent the past week as the guest of Captain and Mrs. Powell. 



July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



hoi-.max. -Mis. Alfrod tfoiraan uv 

from a two months' sojouin it their charming country home 

Los Ga 
HAMMOND.— Mrs. Richard Hammond and Miss Julia Langhorne ha 

returned from a sojjurn of ten days tn the STosemtte Valley. 
JOLUFFB.- Miss Frances JolUtte has returned from Lake Tahoe, where 

she hai b i ■■ ■ guest of her sister and brother-ln-lawi Dr. and Mrs. 

Herbert Moffltt. 
KNIGHT.— Colonel John ') . Knight, TJ, S. A., accompanied by his three 

sons, has arrived In California and taken quarters at Port Mason, 

where Colonel htnlghl will be stationed. 
LA TOURBTTB. — Mrs. La Tourette, of Philadelphia, mother of Mrs. Law- 
rence Fuller and of Mrs. Stalnaker, is at the PaUv e, 
LEE. — General James G. C. Lee, CT. S. A., retired, has arrived In the city, 

and Is a guest at the Granada. 
MILLER.— Miss Marian Miller lias returned to the city after a visit of 

several days at the home of "Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Bernard Ford in Ross 

Valley. 
MINTZER — Miss Mauricla Miutzer has arrived from Paris and is the 

guest of Miss Dora Winn, who, with her grandmother, Mrs. George 

Boardman, is spending the summer at Ross. 
NIEBLING. — Mrs. E. T. Niebling and Miss Rhoda Niebling, who have 

been traveling in Europe for the past year have returned to their 

home in San Francisco. 
PEIXOTTO. — Mrs. Edgar Peixotto has returned from Miramar, and has 

been entertaining for her aunt, Mrs. Nathan of New York. 
ST. GOAR. — Miss Erna St. Goar lias arrived from the East and Europe, 

and is at the family home on California street. 
SYMMES.— Mr. Leslie Symmes, who has been in Uruguay, South Amer- 
ica, Is home for a visit of several weeks. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. 

Frank Symmes. 
VAN RENSSELAER. — Cortlandt S. Van Rensselaar has arrived in San 

Francisco and is a guest at the Palace Hotel. 
WALLACE. — Mrs. Ryland B. Wallace and her son, Bradley Wallace, have 

returned to San Francisco after a visit at Aetna Springs. 
WATERHOUSE. — Mrs. Seymour Waterhuuse has returned to her home 

in San Jose, after a short visit with her aunt, Mis. Robert N. Graves, 

in thi3 city. 
WILCOX. — Miss Mary Wilcox, who has been in Los Angeles for several 

months, has returned. 
WOODS. — Mrs. Robert J. Woods has returned from Santa Barbara, where 

she has been the guest of Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin Brodie. 
ZEILE. — Mrs. Hennctte Zelle and her granddaughters, the Misses Marion 

and Ruth Zeile, have retur l to the city after having spent a week 

or more in San Mateo, 

DEPARTURES. 
ADAMS.— Mrs. Lawson Adams has left for Sonoma County, where she 

will spend a month. 
ALLEN. — Mrs. Henry F. Allen and her daughter, Mrs. Bryant Glimwood, 

leave shortly for Santa Barbai I 
BEAVER.— Mr. and Mrs, Frederi ! Hope Beaver and Miss Isabel Beav< r 

have gone to Inverness for the summer. 
BECKLEY. — Mr. and Mrs. George Beckley have left for Honolulu. 
BOWIE.— Fried lander Bowie has Left for South Africa, Where he will 

spend several months hunting, 

BROWN.— Mis. Philip Kin: I 

gone to Lake TahOi will spend several months. 

CALHOUN. — Miss Martha Calhoun, who be ieen visiting h 

friends tiei e for som< ■ . ■■ nie in 

Cleveland. 
CARROLL The Misses Margaret and Frances * ' bean 

making thi Ir ho w al the Fairmont, havs left foi 
DAVIS mi : Sydney Davis, who all with her 

., .,., Mrs. Pierre Moore, In Belvedere, has returned to 

bara, where she win pass th< ■ summer. 

DEAN, Mi and h£i Walt "> and their daughter, Miss Helen 

i lean, bai ■ where they w 111 reside for th< 

i m m;.v.- Mrs. M. P. i >orn and her daughters, Miss and Miss 

Marlon Dora, left Tuesday for Tahoe Tavern, where they will visit 

for the next month. 
i ,, i .: i Abb] >f ' 

lor the Sim 

GHXRARDETLLI, Ml Ihlrardelll will leave Monday for yellow- 

stone Park. She will be awaj six weeks. 

iond is in Portland, where he has gone on a 
trip, 
HANFORD. -Mrs. Marguerltt Hanford has sailed for SI where 

married on her arrival to Mr. K. w. Schuetler. 
HARDY. Dr. Sumner Hardy lefl Tue« thern California. 

HENRY. Mrs les Henrj hs tn visit her sis- 

ter, | a p. Bishop, and her family. 

at Mountain 
View, after a delightful stay in San Francisco with Mr. and Mis. 

■n C. Lyon. 

! '>eir farallj 

to Carmel-by-tbe-Sea, where they will spend the summer. 
HOWEl i Howell havi gone t" W 

sum; 

JACKSON Mr. and Mrs have left for Lake Tahoe, 

- >rts. 

K1LGARRIF Mrs. J 

her chlldn 

KING. -The M ■*' K4ng uavc s ° ne to Monle - : " : to 

be g 



1 

closed thel i i have gone to Carmcl- 

by-thi ;-■ a, p hei th 3 Uy. 

PARKER- Colon i brief 

vleli to this city. 

Ion tour of Alaska. 
;■■■< 'i i.\i tE3 '!■.! .1 .. Mi', and Mrs, I ■ 

one to their countn leal at Lai where they 

win remain immer, 

SFRBCKBLS. — Mr. and Mrs. John D. Spreckels have left in their yacht 

for Alaska. Mrs. Samuel Knight, Mrs. Horace K. Wilson and J. (J 

Augsbury accompanied them. 
STOVEL. — Mr. and Mrs. c. J. Stovel and family have gone to Weber Lak4 

to remain for several weeks. 
STRATTON.— Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Stratton have gone to their ranch 

in Southern Oregon, where they expect to spend the entire summer. 
TALLANT.— George Tallant left Tuesday night for Santa Barbara, where 

he will he the guest Of his sister. Mrs. J. R. Brodie. for a few weeks. 
WHEELER. — Captain and Mrs. Janus Wheeler will leave soon for the 

East, where Captain Wheeler will he stationed for the next few years. 
WILKINS. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Wilkius and Lawrence H. Van Wyck 

have gone to Brea on a fishing trip. 
WILSON. — James K. Wilson has gone to Portland, and is at present a 

guest In the Multnomah Hotel of that city. 
WISSER. — Colonel and Mrs. John P. Wisser leave for Yosemite shortly. 

to be guests while there of Major and Mrs. William W. Forsythe. 
WOOD. — Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Austin Wood have left for their summer 

home at Palo Alto, where they will be for the next few months. 

INTIMATIONS. 

ALDERSON. — Dr. and Mrs. Henry E. Alderson of San Francisco are In 
New York for a few days, ami are at the Wolcott. 

ALLEN. — Miss Clara Allen, who left for the East a few weeks ago, is in 
Albany, N. Y„ where she is completing her plans to become a nun. 

ALMY. — Commander Almy of the Pacific fleet and Mrs. Almy are at 
Idylwilde, near Alma. 

AVENALI. — Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzo Avenali spent the Fourth of July 
with Mrs. Russell Wilson in her home in San Mateo. 

BARRON. — Mrs. Edward Barron and her daughters. Miss Margaret Bar- 
ron and Miss Evelyn Barron, spent the Fourth of July holiday at Del 
Monte. 

BAUER. — Mrs. John Bauer and Mrs. E. A. Van Bergen spent the week 
with Mr. and Mrs. Charles Jay Foster in their home in Ross Valley. 

BEAVER. — Ml and Mrs. Frederick Hope Beaver and Miss Isabel Beaver 
are at Inverness, where they will be for the next few weeks. 

BLISS.— Mr. and Mrs. Waltei Bliss will spend several weeks of the sum- 
mer as guests of Mr. and Mrs. Duane Bliss at Lake Tahoe. 

BORDEN.— MlSH Juliet Borden of Los Angeles is visiting her aunt, Mrs. 
I. L. Borden. In Devisadero street- 

BOURN. — Mr. and Mrs. William I>. Bourn will go to Ireland to spend part 
of the summer with their daughter, Mrs. Arthur Ruse Vincent and Mr. 
tcent. 

BREWER. — Frank McCoppin Brewer will have in a few weeks for his 
home In Honolulu, where he has been engaged in business for the 
past two years. 
BRYANT.— Miss Marie Louise Bryant, who is enjoying a European tour 
with her grandmother, Mrs. Manns, is now In Holland, where she wilr 
remain for several weeks. 

BUCK. Major and ■ ' Buck will leave Alcatraz, where 

they have been stationed for the past two years, and will go to Fort 

Mackenzie, Wyoming, within the next month. 
CADWALA1 tfSR. Mr and Mrs. Q ■■ idwalader and Mr. and Mrs. 

j j(11 , i ' Mrs. Russell Wilson at San 

Mateo over July 4th. 
CASEY.— Miss until Casuy has return d I i her home In San Rafael, after 

having spent sev< ■ Oakland as the guest of friends. 

CHESEBROUGH.— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Clus.-I. rough have h^en at the 

Newhall home In Palo Alto for a week or more, 

(Continued to Page 22.) 



THE Le GRAND 

Ladies' Tailors 

BRANCH OF OUR NEW YORK ESTABLISHMENT 
FIFTH AVENUE AND 32nd STREET 

In order to introduce our hieh class work wo will make 
durine the summer months our 

$86.00 Suits for $70.00 

80 00 Suits for 85.00 

75.00 Suits for 60.00 

70.00 Suits for 55.00 

65.00 Suits for 50.00 

6000 Suits for 45.00 

55.00 Suits for 40.00 

50.00 Suits for 85.00 



807 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PHONE DOUGLAS 4122 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 




INANCIAL 




The Stock and 
Bond Exchange. 



The feature of the market during 
the month of June was the heavy 
movement in Great Western Power 
S's. People's Water, Associated Oil, 
Spring Valley Water, Hutchinson Sugar, and several other is- 
sues. The bond movement was remarkably strong for this sea- 
son of the year, the total sales easily ranging over the $1,200,- 
000 mark. Great Western Power easily led in the total of trans- 
actions. The price gained a point to 88, and has been strong 
ever since the company began its successful effort to break into 
the northern bay counties field, which up to that time had been 
almost exclusively dominated by the Pacific Gas and Electric 
Company. Oro Electric is showing the same strengthening 
tendency since it began its move before the State Railroad Com- 
mission to invade the local field. Spring Valley Water was 
heavily sold in small lots by timid investors, who fear the pres- 
ent suits threatened by the Supervisors to force the company 
to extend its mains in sections of the city reported to be in- 
adequately served. The price fell to 60 flat, a drop of some 3 
points, followed by partial recovery. Associated Oil was under 
lively manipulation for several days. It started at 43V2, and 
under very heavy buying pressure reached 44.75, closing the 
week at 44.50. The stock has been an enigma to the street 
ever since President Sproule announced the resumption of divi- 
dends in the near future. The company is reported to be in the 
most prosperous condition in its history, and is making big ex- 
tensions. These will cost money, and the street cannot figure 
out how the charges on these extensions can be paid and divi- 
dend disbursements made at the same time. The bond market 
was very firm throughout the week; stocks were dull and ir- 
regular. Some $10,000,000 was disbursed by banks and other 
corporations in dividends this week, and it is expected a large 
part of this sum will be placed in gilt-edged securities. 



Ferdinand Thieriot and Harold 
Advent of Mack, local representatives of the 

Byrne & McDonnell. prominent Wall street firm of Byrne 

& McDonnell, have just completed 
the purchase of the local branch of Logan & Bryan in the Mer- 
chants' Exchange Building. They will move into their new 
quarters with their force of clerks about July 15th. Logan & 
Bryan will handle then grain business in Chicago, and will 
continue to furnish a special wire service daily from all the big 
Eastern exchanges. This means the retirement of Logan & 
Bryan from the local field, and possibly from Los Angeles, 
where they have a local branch. The Seattle branch will be 
maintained. With this transfer, Byrne & McDonnell step into 
the front rank of local brokerage houses. The success of 
Messrs. Thieriot and Mack has been remarkable since their 
advent into the San Francisco stock and bond field a few years 
ago. A short time ago they planned the purchase of the 
brokerage branch of Ehrich & Co., on Pine street for the benefit 
of Byrne & McDonnell. In a few months the two young men 
built up a thriving business, which proved too large for their 
quarters. In looking over the field further to advance their 
position, they hit upon the coup of capturing the stronghold so 
long occupied by Logan & Bryan. Mr. Thieriot made a special 
trip to the East to lay his plans and propositions before Byrne 
& McDonnell. The showing looked so promising that Mr. Mc- 
Donnell came West to investigate the situation, with the result 
that the deal was promptly completed. 



Bank Clearings 
Of Fiscal Year. 



San Francisco bank clearings for 
the fiscal year 1911-12 amounted to 
$2,553,155,093.68, against $2,376,- 
189,469.95 for the fiscal year 1910- 
1911, or a gain of $176,965,623.73. Clearings for the last half 
of the calendar year 1911 were $1,273,014,265.65, against 
$1,201,372,763.10 for the last half of the calendar year 1910, or 
a gain for the six months' period of $71,641,502.55. Clearings 



for the first half of the calendar year 1912 were $1,280,140,- 
828.03, against $1,174,816,706.85 for the first half of the cal- 
endar year 1911, or a gain for the six months' period of $105,- 
324,121.18. Unless unusual factors arise, the clearings for the 
last half of any calendar year are greater than for the first half 
of the same year. This is due to the fact that the latter half of 
the year includes the harvesting and crop-moving seasons and 
increased retail trade during the holiday season. Notwithstand- 
ing this, the clearings during the first half of 1912 exceeded 
those of the last half of 1911 by $7,126,562.38. In view of the 
crop reports and Pacific Coast trade expansion the expenditures 
called for by great projects planned and by general building 
activity, it is probable that the clearings for the last half of 
1912 will reach close to $1,400,000,000, or nearly $2,700,000,000 
for the calendar year. 



Tonopah Merger was the only issue 
Mining Share Market, to display any unusual activity dur- 
ing the week. The shaft is now 
down 900 feet. On the report of a strike in what promises to be 
a good vein, the price of the shares nearly doubled in value to 
80. Naturally this tempted profit taking on the part of those 
who got in on the ground floor, and the price receded some ten 
points, where it apparently found firm footing. Midway ex- 
perienced a small flurry, which quickly petered out. The 
others continued irregular in narrow margins, the Tonopahs 
showing the most life under the steady weekly ore output of its 
producers, the total values being some $220,000 each week. 
Goldfield Con. and Tonopah Ex. sold ex-dividend, and the for- 
mer fell back to $3.95. As the continuance of its regular quar- 
terly dividend of 30 cents per share is assured for some time to 
come by the large bodies of ore reserves, the chances are strong 
that its price will remain around $4, when it is not disturbed by 
rumors of strikes and other events to cause marked fluctuations. 
The Comstocks, Goldfields and Manhattans clung close to even 
figures in the face of the adjournment of the Exchange over the 
Fourth of July to Monday morning, July 8th. 



The Anglo and London-Paris 
Financial Outlook. National Bank, in its June "Finan- 

cial Letter," summarized business 
conditions as follows : 

"Activity in business continues to increase regardless of the 
political situation, which has assumed a form which makes 
certain the continuance of bitter controversy until after election. 
The recent British strikes hardly made a ripple on the surface 
of the British money market, and production and trade in the 
United States are now more active in nearly all lines than at any 
previous time since 1907. The period, however, is not favorable 
to the flotation of new enterprises in which immediate profits 
are not to be expected even when regarded as certain to become 
profitable within a reasonable time, and interests which have 
underwritten some promising ventures, both in this country and 
London, have found it difficult to distribute the securities. The 



byrne & McDonnell 

MEMBERS 
New York Stock Exchange 

New York Cotton Exchange 

Chicago Board of Trade 

Securities Bought and Sold on Commission 

STOCKS, BONDS, COTTON AND GRAIN 

Private 'Wires to Chicago and New York 

H. L. MACK, Resident Partner F. THIERIOT, Manager 

409 Pine Street, San Franeitco 



ON JULY 1, 1912 

We will move our offices to 410 Montgomery Street 

Our Facilities for handling 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

Will be considerably increased 

Established 1858 

SUTRO & CO 



Telephone Sutter 3434 



Private Exchange Connecting ull Depts. 



July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



market prefers bonds as against shares, except as to the very 
strongest corporations, and railroads, and industrials in need 
of additional capital have sometimes been compelled to in- 
crease indebtedness when they would have preferred to in- 
crease the security behind their bonds. As the future course 
of interest rates seems quite uncertain, necessary financing con- 
tinues to a large extent in the form of short term notes. A fea- 
ture of the money market is the growing volume of municipal 
bonds which is coming upon the market as the result of the gen- 
eral expansion of municipal activities. Vigorous efforts con- 
tinue on the part of associations of business men not connected 
with banks to educate the public as to the necessity of the con- 
centration of our gold reserves and placing our currency on a 
basis which permits elasticity. The endeavor is to show that 
it is not banks but depositors and borrowers who are most con- 
cerned with banking and monetary reform, and that the or- 
ganization of the proposed National Association is such as to 
prevent its control by any section or group of interests. While 
business is very active, money for investments accumulates in 
excess of requirements for trade and industry upon its present 
basis, and as demand for speculative use is unusually light 
for this season, New York is the easiest money market in the 
world, and has been able to send large sums to Europe, and 
especially to Germany, which has been strengthening its re- 
serves in preparation for the July settlement. Money is abund- 
ant throughout the United States for current transactions, and 
the crops will be moved without difficulty. 

Full returns from the joint call of the Comptroller of the 
Currency and the California Superintendent of Banks as of June 
14th are not yet available, but the gain of the San Francisco 
national banks from June 7, 1911, was, in resources, $16,770,- 
552.46, in individual deposits, $6,506,177.72, and in loans 
$7,951,579.89. Silver maintained during June the highest aver- 
age since October, 1907, fluctuating between 60% and 62 cents 
for low and high respectively. 



Sale of City 
Civic Bonds. 



The widely advertised sale of San 
Francisco municipal bonds, totaling 
$5,300,000 5's, on July 1st, at- 
tracted unusual attention on the 
part of bond houses here and in the East. N. W. Halsey & Co. 
submitted the highest bid, $5,542,321. The other bidders were : 
Anglo and London-Paris National Bank, $5,530,285; E. H. Rol- 
lins & Sons, $5,523,607; J. H. Adams & Co., $5,512,000. If the 
bonds are awarded to Halsey, it will mean that the city will 
pay a net rate of interest of 4.60 per cent. At the last sale, 
municipal 5's were taken on a basis of 4.55, being reoffered to 
investors on a 4.35 basis. It is probable that the present block 
will be offered to investors on a basis of about 4.40. 



The Supervisors have adopted the majority report of the 

water rates committee, signed by Supervisors Caglieri and 
Mauzy, and rejected the minority report, signed by Supervisor 
Andrew J. Gallagher. The vote stood 16 to 2. The majority 
report made no change in the existing rates, while Gallagher's 
report provided for a 4 per cent reduction. The majority re- 
port avoided reference to the value of the Spring Valley prop- 
erties, and Supervisor Caglieri said that this had been done, 
and the rates left undisturbed in order to preserve the statue quo 
of the negotiations for the purchase by the city of the Spring 
Valley properties. Gallagher's report provided for a 5 per cent 
return to the company on a valuation of $26,000,000. 



From Washington comes the report that banks have 

raised a storm of protest to Congress and the Treasury Depart- 
ment against the proposed coinage of 3 cent and ' 2 cent pieces. 
The new coins, it is contended, would revolutionize commercial 
mechanical devices. Cash drawers and registers, adding 
machines and counting machines would have to be changed, 
and it would be necessary to rule another column on ledgers to 
accommodate the fractional piece. The Treasury Department 
has abandoned the idea of a fantastic half-cent piece with a 
scalloped edge, in case Congress should order the new coins. 
Financial institutions protested that the coin should have an 
even diameter. The three-cent piece, however, would have a 
hole in the center if the coin is authorized. 



According to a consular report received at the State De- 
partment, Washington, there are ten steamers of more than 
3,000 tons burden each in course of construction in Japan at 
the Kawasaki yard, Kobe, and the Mitsu Bishi Yard, Nagasaki. 
These vessels are being built in anticipation of the opening 
of the Panama Canal. 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



( New York Stock Exchange 
i < «? w York CottonJ&cfaiofe 



Chicaio Board of Trade 

The Stock and Bood Exchange. Sao Fran dace 



Main Office 

MILLS BUILDING 

Sid Frantiico, California 



Branch Offices 

Lea Angeles Sao Diego 
Coronado Beach Portland. Ore. 

Seattle, Wash. Vancouver, B. C. 



ARMOR PLATE SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of Union Safe Deposit Company in Building of 

UNION TRUST COMPANY 

of San Francisco 

Junction of Market and O'Farrell Streets and Grant Avenue 




Largest, Strongest and Most Conveniently Arranged 
Safe Deposit West of New York 

Boxes $4.00 Per Annum and Upwards 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

French -American Bank of Savings (Savings Department.) 

For the halt -..- June 30, 1913, a dividend has been declared at 

the rate of four Mi per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Monday. July i. 1912. Dividends not called for are 

added b the same rate of interest as the principal from July 

l. 1912, A. LEGALLBT, President. 

Office — 108 Sutter street. San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hibernla Savings and Loan Society. 
For tin- six months ending Jul i dividend has been declared 

at the rate of three and three-fourths io->i) per cent per annum on all 
deposits, free of taxes, payable on and niter Monday, July l. 1912. Divi- 
dends not drawn its, become a part 
thereof, and will earn dividend from July 1, 1912. Deposits made on or 
before Julv 10, 1912, will draw interest from Julv 1. 1912. 

R. M.TOBIN. Secretary'. 
Office— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts.. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Italian-American Bank. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1912, a divio n declared at 

the rate of four (4) pet mum on all savings deposits, free of 

payable on and alter Monday. July l. 1912. Dividends not called 
: be added to tie' principal and hear the same rate of interest 
from Jul\ 1. 1 M L' . Monev deposited on or before July 10, 1912, will earn 
st from July 1. 1912. A. Si'.ARRORO. President. 

-S. E. corner of afontfi Sacramento Sts.. S. F. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 
(The German Bank.) 
For the half year ending June 30, 1912, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Monday, July 1, 1912. Dividends not called for are added 
to the deposit account and earn dividends from July 1. 1912. 

GEORGE TOURNY. Manager. 

Office — 526 California street, San Francisco. Cal. Mission Branch, 2572 

in street, near 22d. Richmond District Branch, S01 Clement St., cor. 

":h avenue. Haight St. Branch, 1456 Haight street, between Masonic and 

Ashbury. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1912. a dividend has been declared at 
'he rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all pavings deposits, free of 
■-ixes. pnvjble on and after Monday. July 1. 1912. Mvidends not called 
t are added to and bear the same rate of Interest as the principal from 
July 1. 1912. H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 

Office— 753 Market street, near Fourth. San Francisco. Cal. 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 



S®ekB amadl IP©rs@nn<aiIl Bttsnans 



(Continued from Page 19.) 
CROCKER. — Mr. and Mrs. Temple ton Crocker will return the latter part 

of July to Honolulu with Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dillingham, the latter 

are now visiting at Uplands. 
CUNNINGHAM. — Mrs. James Cunningham has taken a cottage at Mira- 

mar for the summer. 
DASSONV1LLE. — Mr. and Mrs. William E. Dassonville have returned to 

their home in Berkeley, after a visit of several days with Mrs. Dasson- 

ville's parents, Dr. and Mrs. Edward Everett Perry, in Ross. 
DORGELOH. — H. F. Dorgeloh, accompanied by Fred Huntzicker and W. 

H. "Worswick, are among the hunters in Mendocino County. 
GALLOIS. — Mrs. Eugene Gallois, with Miss Jeanne and John Gallois, have 

given up their apartments at the Peninsula. They will remain at the 

Fairmont Hotel throughout the fall and winter months. 
GLASS.— Mr. and Mrs. Frank Glass and their two little daughters, Anita 

and Eleano , are spending the month of July at Napa Soda Springs. 
GREGG. — Miss Enid Gregg is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Morrow at Santa 

Cruz. 
HARTIGAN — Ensign and Mrs. Charles Conway Hartlgan, who have made 

their home at Annapolis for the past year, are now In New York. 
HEYNEMAX. — Mr. and Mrs. Hermann Heyneman are at Marienbad. 
KNIGHT. — Colonel John T. Knight and his three sons are at Fort Mason. 
LE BRETON. — Mr. and Mrs. Albert Ue Breton and Miss Le Breton are 

in New York for a few days, and are staying at the Hotel WoK-ott. 
MARYE. — Mrs. George Marye will spend the summer at Newport as tho 

guest of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Moreland and Miss Esther Moreland. 
MONTEAGLE. — Mr. and Mis. JLouis Monteagle and their sons, who are In 

London, will go to Stockholm in July. 
NEWHALL. — William Mayo Newhall spent several days last week visiting 

his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Athol MoBean, at their 

attractive summer home in Auburn. 
NICHOLS. — Miss Margaret Nichols has returned to her home in San 

Mateo, after a visit at the home of her sister, Mrs. Charles Mills, in 

Buchanan street. 
OTIS. — Mr. and Mrs. James Otis, with Miss Cora and Miss Frederika Otis, 

are returning from Panama by way of New York. 
PETERS. — Mr. and Mis. Charles Rollo Peters are at Carmel-by-the-Sea, 

where they will remain for the next three weeks. 
PEYTON. — Bernard Peyton is at the Wolcott in New York. 
PILLSBURY.— Mrs. Horace Pillsbury will not go East until the latter 

part of July. 
PITMAN. — Mrs. Harriette B. Pitman is at the Hotel Sutter, where she 

will remain indefinitely. 
POTTER. — Mr. and Mrs. Milo Potter and Miss Nina Jones are at Glacier 

Point Hotel for ten days. 
RAMMAGE. — Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Rammage are spending a few days in 

Pacific Grove as the guests of Mrs. fiammage's mother, Mrs. Hamil- 
ton Bowie. 
REID. — Miss Merrltt Reid is planning to leave next week for "Eagles' 

Nest," the country home of the Baron and Baroness von Schroeder in 

San Luis Obispo. 
SCHUMANN. — Paymaster and Mrs. Roland Weyburn Schumann are 

spending their honeymoon at Lake Tahoe. 
SCOTT.— Mrs. Irving M. Scott, her niece, Miss Effle Brown, and Mrs. 

Wm. Pierson, are visiting in Los Gatos. 
SESNON. — Mr. and Mrs. William Sesnon are established at their beautiful 

home near Capitola, and are entertaining at delightful house parties. 
SUTTON. — Mr. and Mrs. Effingham Sutton and their little daughu-r will 

spend the summer in Belvedere as guests of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar 

M. Wilson. 
TALLANT. — Mrs. John Tallant and Miss Elsie Tallant are enjoying a visit 

in New York. They are guests at the Hotel Wolcott. 
VERNON. — Mr. and Mrs. Howard Vernon and Misses Helen, Ruth and 

Mae Vernon are spending the month of July in Los Angeles and San 

Diego. 
WEILL. — Michel Weill, a nephew of Raphael Weill, spent the Fourth as 

the guest of friends at Pel Monte. 
WILSON. — Mrs. Jack Wilson of New York has arrived to take possession 

for the season of the Charles W. Clark house in Burlingame. 
WOODS. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick N. Woods are the guests of Mr. and 

Mrs. John Ferris in England. 
YOUXOKR. — Dr. and Airs. Edward A. Younger have closed their home In 

Sacramento street, and taken apartmi nta at the Fairmont. 
WELLER. — Judge and Mrs. Charles Weller and their daughter, Mis. 

Earl Shipp. will spend July in Shasta County. 



Congressman J. R. Knowland has sent a communication 

in answer to the petition from the Oakland City Council for an 
appropriation of $1,000,000 to aid in the develepoment of the 
Key Route Basin. Mayor Frank K. Mott has received the fol- 
lowing telegram: "Have taken up with the engineer's office the 
matter of the Oakland harbor survey. I am informed that 
owing to broad language of authorization for new survey in 
pending river and harbor bill there is probably no question 
but that the local engineer can include Key Route Basin." 



Candy Sent to the Country.— A box of candy is always 

welcomed by friends in the country. Easily sent by express 
from any one of George Haas & Sons' four candy stores. 




RAWINGS 

iy of ojyy description., 
'ajrvd far 5 every purpose, ii\ 

PEN and INK o R WA5H, 

ybr' Letterheads 
C a.tal, o G s . Cover, s, 

riA.GA-Z.INES OR; 

Ad" Dbsigns.©>»s» 

MECnAM^DRWINGS 

from Blue Prints or Pencil Sketches 
BIRDS -EYE VI EW5. KB 
RETOUCHING PHOTOGRNPriS. 

»i Halt -tones. Zinc Etchings. 
Color Work or EVCRy *■ 
description, in Two. Three I 

OR MORE COLORS. <e_^3B 

.Commercial Photographing.' 

H.F.Krimiilx 



HOOKER &. LENT BLDG. 



503 MARKET ST. 



San Francisco 



THE LATEST STYLES IN 

Choice Woolens 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO., Merchant Tailor. 
106-110 Saner Street Truck Bank Bldf. 



SULTAN TURKISH BATHS 

624 POST STREET. 

Special Department for Ladles. 

Open Day and Night for Ladles and Gentlemen. 

Al. lohnson, formerly of Sutter Street Hammam, has leased the 

Sultan Turkish Baths, where he will be glad to see his old and new 

customers. 



Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Eugene Payne, dentists, have resumed 

practice at 146 Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 66. Hours: 9 to 4. 



Valuable 


Newsp 


aper In 


formation 


ALLEN'S 


PRESS 


GLIPPING 


BUREAU 


88 FIRST STREET San Francisco 
Phones: Kearny 382 J 1588 

CLIPPINGS OF ANYTHING YOU WISH 



THROUGH RAILROAD TICKETS 

Issued to All Parts of 

United States, Canada and Mexico 

In Connection With These Magnificent Passenger Steamers 



Portland 

First Class $10, $12. $15 
Second Class $6 



Los Angeles 

First Class $8.35 
Second Class $5.35 




SAILINGS EVERY FIVE DAYS 



The San Francisco & Portland S. S. Co. 
A. OTTINGER, General Agent 

Ticket Offices, 722 Market, opp. Call, Tel. Sutter 2344 

8 East St., opp. Ferry Bldr, Tel. Sutter 2482. 
Berkeley Office: 2105 Shattuck, Tel. Berkeley 331. 



July 6, 1912 



and California Advertiser 



23 




"Have you a good cook now?" "I don't know. I have 

not been home since breakfast." — London Opinion. 

Mrs. Fidget — What's that noise I hear down in the 

library? Mr. Fidget — Must be the history repeating itself. Go 
to sleep. — Puck. 

Green — Why was the will set aside? Brown — It kept 

getting in the way of the lawyers who were settling the estate. 
— Judge's Library. 

"I'm sorry to find the baroness out. Don't forget to 

tell her I called, will you?" "No, sir; I'll tell her at once." — 
Fliegende Blaetter. 

When we decide to forgive our enemies we generally be- 
gin with those who are bigger and stronger than we are. — Chi- 
cago Record-Herald. 

"I once thought seriously of marrying for money." "Why 

didn't you, then?" "The girl in the case was a thinker, too." 
— Boston Transcript. 

Mrs. Chinn — You know my husband just won't listen to 

good, common sense talk. Mrs. Frank — How do you know? — 
Yonkers Statesman. 

Dollie — That's a perfectly beautiful engagement ring 

Jack gave you ! Mollie — I didn't know I had shown it to you ! 
Dollie — You didn't! — Judge. 

"I think, sir, that you are sitting on my hat." "Is yours 

a soft or a hard hat?" "It is a soft hat, sir." "Then I am not 
sitting on it." — Meggendorfer Blaetter. 

"What are you writing, old chap?" "An article entitled, 

'Advice to Graduates.'" "Eh! Advice to grad . Well, 

of all the presumption!" — Boston Transcript. 

Howell — What sort of a fellow is he? Powell — He can 

make two lemons grow where only one grew before, and then 
hand them both to you when you are not looking. — Judge. 

"Mother," asked the little one, on the occasion of a num- 
ber of guests being present at dinner, "will the dessert hurt me, 
or is there enough to go round?" — Sacred Heart Review. 

Politician — What is the next question to bring before 

the American people? The Voter — They have had questions 
enough. What they want now is a few answers. — Puck. 

Mrs. Scrappy — Did you see this, John: 'Woman Stung! 

Can't Talk! Puzzles Doctors!' Scrappy — Mary, a woman's 
tongue that can't talk would puzle more than doctors. — Life. 

First College Youth — How did you make Miss Passay 

think you were the finest fellow on earth? Second College 
Youth — I sent her twenty beautiful roses on her thirtieth birth- 
day." — Satire. 

The young man wanted an understanding before he pro- 
posed. "Can you wash dishes?" he asked. "Oh, yes," said the 
girl; "can you wipe 'em?" He didn't propose. — Louisville 
Courier Journal. 

"If you do good work, your work will grow after you 

are gone." "That's a fact.. Rubens left only some 2,000 pic- 
tures, but there are 100,000 of his pictures in circulation now." 
— Washington Herald. 

Lady (to small boy who is fishing) — I wonder what your 

father would say if he caught you fishing on Sunday? Boy — I 
don't know. You'd better ask him. That's him a little farther 
up the stream. — Lippincott's. 

"Is you gwine ter let dat mewel do as he please?" asked 

Uncle Ephraim's wife; "wha's you' will power?" "My will 
power's alright," he answered; "you jest want ter come out hyar 
an' measure dis here mewel's won't power." — Christian Reg- 
ister. 

Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely perfumed powdered le 
carry in the purst;. A handy article for all occasions to quickly 1m- 

Srove the comp'e*l"n Sot for 10 cents In stamps or coin. F. T. Hop- 
Ins. 37 Great Jonas St, N. T. 



t* 



Toyo Risen 
Kaisha 

(ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO.) 

S. S3. Nippon Maru Saturday, July 6th, 1912 

(intermediate Servuo H:M : „i,„„i.i i i,„,, 

S. S. Tenyo Maru (via Manila direct) Friday, July 12th, 1912 

S. S. Shinyo Maru (New) Saturday, August 3'. 1912 

S. S. Chiyo Maru Saturday, August 31, 1912 

Steamers sail from company's pier, No. 34. near foot of Brannan 
street. 1 p. m. for Yokohama and Hongkong, calling at Honolulu, 
Kobe (Hlogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hong- 
kong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

No cargo received on b->ard on day of sailing. 

Round trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For freight and passage apply at office, 4th floor. Western Metrop- 
olis National Bank Building, 655 Market street. 

W. H. AVERY', Assistant General Manager. 



City Index and Purchasers' Gui de 

PHYSICIANS. " 

Dr. W. P. Agnew has moved his office to this city, and Is now to be 
found In Room 424. Flood Building. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 

Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. All legal papers drawn up accurately 

107 Montgomery street, near Sutter, San Francisco. 'Phone Douglas 601. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Fell 9911. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St., now at room 403 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORN EYS-AT-LAW. ~ 

Samuel L. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rlegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 
Bunions and In-growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 
206-206 Westbank building. 830 Market street. San Francisco. 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone Douglas 2608 



Your stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY 
Let us guide you in your selections 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importer* of and Dealers in 
THE HIGHEST CLASS PAPER F ° R OFFICE STATIONERY 
Battery and Jackson Streets San Francisco. Cal 



J B Pon J' Bergez C. Mailhebuau C. Lalanne L. Coufard 

BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 

4IS-42I Bush St . Sao Francisco (Above Kearay) Exchaotr. Douglas 2411 



•7¥i3H3 



..ubBERSTaml. 

Stencils.Seals.Signs i Etc.I 



560 MARKET ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 



STATEMENT 

Of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities of 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 



HIBERNIA BANK 

(A Corporation) 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco) 

DATED JUNE 80, 1912 



ASSETS. 

1— Bonds of the United States ($8,585,000.00), 
of the State of California and Municipalities 
thereof ($4,091,137.50), of the State of New 
York ($650,000.00), the actual value of 
which is $14,566,400.65 

2 — Cash in United States Gold and Silver Coin 

and Checks 1,785,621.29 

3— Miscellaneous Bonds ($6,185,000.00), the ac- 
tual value of which is 6,200,644.06 



$22,552,666.00 



They are: 

"San Francisco and North Pacific Rail- 
way Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($476,- 
000.00), "Southern Pacific Branch Railway 
Company of California 6 per cent Bonds" 
($306,000.00), "Southern Pacific Company, 
San Francisco Terminal 4 per cent Bonds" 
($150,000.00), "Western Pacific Railway Co. 

5 per cent Bonds" ($250,000.00), "San Fran- 
cisco and San Joaquin Valley Railway Com- 
pany 5 per cent Bonds" ($120,000,001, 
"Northern California Railway Company 5 per 
cent Bonds" ($83,000.00), "Northern Railway 
Company of California 5 per cent Bonds" 
($54,000.00), "Market Street Cable Company 

6 per cent Bonds" ($758,000.00), "Market 
Street Railway Company First Consolidated 
5 per cent Bonds" ($753,000.00), "Los An- 
geles Pacific Railroad Company of California 
Refunding 5 per cent Bonds'- ($400,000.00), 
"Los Angeles Railway Company of Califor- 
nia 5 per cent Bonds" ($334,000.00), "The 
Omnibus Cable Company 6 per cent Bonds" 
($167,000.00), "Sutter St. Railway Company 
5 per cent Bonds" ($150,000.00), "Gough 
Street Railwav Company 5 per cent Bonds" 
($20,000.00), "Ferries and Cliff House Rail- 
way Company 6 per cent Bonds" ($6,000.00), 
"San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose Rail- 
way Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($5,000.00), 
"The Merchants' Exchange 7 per cent Bonds" 
($1,450,000.00), "San Francisco Gas and 
Electric Company 4\' 2 per cent Bonds" ($553,- 
000.00), "Los Angeles Gas and Electric Com- 
pany 5 per cent Bonds" ($100,000.00), 
"Spring Valley Water Company 4 per cent 
Bonds" ($50,000.00). 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 

The condition of said Promissory Notes 
and Debts is as follows : They are all existing 
Contracts, owned by said Corporation, and 
are payable to it at its office, which is situ- 
ated at the corner of Market, McAllister and 
Jones streets, in the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California, and the pay- 
ment thereof is secured by First Mortgages 



32,260,268.29 



on Real Estate within this State. Said Promis- 
sory Notes are kept and held by said Corpora- 
tion at its said office, which is its principal 
place of business, and said Notes and Debts 
are there situated. 

5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 297,879.00 

The Condition of said Promissory Notes 
and debts is as follows : They are all existing 
Contracts, owned by said Corporation, and 
are payable to it at its office, which is situated 
as aforesaid, and the payment thereof is se- 
cured by pledge and hypothecation of Bonds 
of Railroad and Quasi-Public Corporations 
and other securities. 

6' — (a) Real Estate situated in the City and 
County of San Francisco ($1,035,150.97), and 
in the Counties of Santa Clara ($13,891.54), 
Alameda ( $2,997.80), and of Los Angeles 
($5,396.62), in this State, the actual value of 

which is 1,057,436.93 

(b) The Land and Building in which said 
Corporation keeps its said office, the actual 

value of which is 976,089.93 

The Condition of said Real Estate is that 
it belongs to said Corporation, and part of it 
is productive. 

7 — Accrued Interest on Loans and Bonds 276,496.47 

TOTAL ASSETS $57,420,836.62 

LIABILITIES. 

1 — Said Corporation Owes Deposits amounting 

to and the actual value of which is $54,099,874.46 

(Number of Depositors, 83,378.) 
Average Amount of Deposits, $648.45. 

2 — Contingent Fund — Accrued In- 
terest on Loans and Bonds $ 276,496.47 

3— Reserve Fund, Actual Value.. 3,044,465.69 3,320,962.16 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $57,420,836.62 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
By R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County of San Francisco — ss. 

JAMES R. KELLY and R. M. TOBIN, being each duly 
sworn, each for himself, says : That said JAMES R. KELLY is 
President and that said R. M. TOBIN is Secretary, of THE 
HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Corpora- 
tion above mentioned, and that the foregoing statement is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this first day of July, 1912. 
CHAS. T. STANLEY, Notary Public in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of California. 



July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



25 




'owm 



-• ,';} 



By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

New licenses were issued to the following purchasers of au- 
tomobiles in San Francisco and vicinity for the week ending 
June 29th. The total number of licenses issued for the State 
for the same period was 934. 

» * * 

DE LUCHI. LAWRENCE, 5866 Marshal] St., Oakland Buick 

LAVAGETTO, GIACANO, 1117 Caroline St.. Alameda Oakland 

WARE. TAliBOT, 1205 Spruce St., Berkeley Imperial 

ANDERSON, J., 282A Guerrero St.. S. F Grabowsky 

DE FREMERY-CADMAN MAT. CO., East < lakland Warren 

BLABON, C. W., 145U Broadway. Oakland Buick 

PLUMMER, H. P., 1008 Crocker Bldg., S. P Mercer 

BROWN, CHAS. U., 4S41 Mission St., S. F Ford 

MAYER, E. G., 2850 Union St., S. F Franklin 

EVANS, PIERCE, 514 11th Ave., S. F Ford 

CHAUFFEURS' UNION, 126 Fulton St.. S. F Ford 

ROBERTSON, D. J.. 542 Van Ness Ave., S. F Oakland 

GLOBE GRAIN AND MILL CO., S. F Oakland 

CRICHTON, C. 207 Cole St., S. F Abbott-Detroit 

ST. FRANCIS IMP. CO., St. Francis Hotel, S. F Chalmers 

O'BRIEN, J. J.. Pacific Bids., s. F Studebaker 

S. P. MILLING CO., Royal Insurance Bldg., S. F Flanders 

OAKLAND & ANTIOCH R. R. CO., Shreve Bldg., S. F Flanders 

McGAFFIGAN. f. J., 4S2 Second Ave., s. F E-M-F 

BLUXOME, I. D.. 532 Monadnock BldK.. S. F E-M-F 

SMITH, H. M.. »S!) Yoik St., s. F Peerless 

CHISHOLM, S. W., 1085 Monadnock Bldg., s. F Cadillac 

LEE, L. E.. 2711 Steiner St.. S. F Auburn 

BRANCH, i MOo. II.. Hotel SI. James, S. F Cartercar 

BURG, C. II.. 660 Market SI., S. F Loco 

JENNINGS, thus., nil Bryant St., S. F Reo 

HAMMOND, CHAS. M., 512 Golden Gate Ave., s. F Cadillac 

CLANCY & LcCLAIR. 172 12th St., Oakland Flanders 

DERRICK, GEO. II.. 426 Vernon St.. Oakland Rambler 

KUDER, WM. S., 1st Nat i:k. Bldg., Oakland Warren-Detroit 

THAYER, 1 E., mi Fairmont Ave., Oakland Reo 

DENMAN, DR. C. H., 2818 Russell St., Berkeley Flanders 

GIBBARD, W. F.. 3428 Fruitvale Ave.. Frultvale Cartercar 

McKAY MOTOR PRAYING CO., 2828 Harrison St., S, F Gramm 

MARQUARD, HENRY, r,::: Golden Gate Ave., S. F National 

JAMES, C. A,, 1834 Ninth Ave.. S. F Ford 

SACK, H. F., 40th and Piedmont Ave.. Oakland Commerce 

FILMER, GEO., 880 Jackson St., S. F Wlnton 

PACIFIC GAS & ELEC. CO., S. F Chalmers 

BAUMGARTIO.V BROS., 1495 Ellis St. S, F Elmore 

PHRANG, MRS. M., 277 Shaftei Ave., Oakland 

CLEAVES, .mks. i, m i I nd Columbus 

WILLS, MISS EMMA. HIS nth St., Oal I Mitchell 

HERSEY. R. w,. 486 s. Third St., San Jose Kissel 

PACIFIC GAS & ELEC CO., S. F E-.M-F 

SOMERS & CO., S. F E-M-F 

KNIPPENBHRG, GEO, K. 128 P Si. s. F. ... toddard-Dayton 

HOUSTAN, I >K. A. J.. Union Sciuarc ill. it. s. F Locomobile 

BROWN, L. C, 852 Mills Bldg., S. F Locomobile 

SHINN, D. E., Hotel Holland, S. 1' Buick 

BRUSHER. WM. F . can Stand Gas Bins i i Oakland Stoddard-Dayton 

EDWARDS, B. F.. US Hlllciest Ave., Berkeley Loo 

STRANG, FRED N., 828 Pacini Regal 

RAMAGE, A., 4315 Front St, S. F Hudson 

ADELBERG, K A., 1035 Geary St., S. F Mitchell 

MOLLEH. I,.. 2966 Adellni Si. Berkeley Mitchell 

PACIFIC COAST SYRUP CO . S, F Buick 

MILLER, R !•:.. 611 Mission St., S. F Renault 

MAUZY, c s. ii Stockton s t . s r Stoddard-Dayton 

WELLS. R. E. 2418 Dai Stutz 

IiRUM. GEORGI1 S. F I ■ troit Electric 

KioRHi.FF, T i'. FoxcratT Bldg., s i stutz 

PORE, GEO. \ . ,-■ S. F Pope-Hartford 

STEWART FRUIT CO., Crocker Bldg., S F Flanders 

CHLENBURG, K i St.. S. F Hudson 

LEVY. BBJF, Uontgomer) St., s. F overland 

ABRAHAMSnN BROS., 13th and Washington Sis Oakland ..Overland 

OAKLAND ii RNITURE CO., l-'th and Claj st^.. Oakland Overland 

MoINTIRB, W, H„ 404 11th St.. Oakland Overland 

SAGEBORN, W„ 864 Castro SI Oakland Reo 

DAVIS, .1. II.. 40!) A Oak St.. S. F Auburn 

CARTER. ,t. w.. 151 Belvedere si s F. ..... Oakland 

BLACK, ■' K , 378 si- 

GREAT western POWER CO., S. F Buick 

MILLER, F E. 11 ind Federal 

MacCLEYF.R I'Y, i'. C . IC.l II 1 Franklin 

WAKEFIELD, DR. W II. 1842 ISth si Oakland .'halmers 

white, w •, . i" Oakvale Ave.. B Franklin 

REIST. K. S. 2706 Fulton Si ..White 

Rose, THOS r 3200 Shattuck Ave. Berkele: ..Buick 

HSHEK, L. F., 1«17 Hlbberd si Alameda Ramhl-i 

MAND1CH. MILES, 3642 171 

GOLDWATER. M., Grand ,w -ins, Oakland . 

CORLISS. E. M„ 172 7th Ave, S. F. ■ 'verlan.l 

HIBERNIA SAV. & LOAN. SO' - r, . .Abbott- 

PACIFIC GAS * I '45 Sutter St., S F 

WHITTlER-t'OBURN CO.. Howard and Beale Sis.. S. F 

THORPE, JAS -;:74 Hannah si Oakland Reo 

ST. ORES. VI h Ave,, S. I .. . Pullm-n 

JCAN, ROBT ' lakland 

ZF.1MED, HENRY. 12th and Washington St . Oakland 
PORTER. H. G .. Oakland . 
JUDSON 

Castro St.. S. F Fierce-Arrow 

GRAY MAJt'R A, US 1 - ■ E-M-F 

TUPPER. R B. 297 Church St., S F .Buick 

ONORATO VIN< EN1 2121 Fillmore St.. S. F Elmore 

CAL PLATE * WINDOT 'verland 

FOREMAN". MRS II J. 24J Centr Overland 

•'R. I ■ R., 45 Ellis 



Sr^ffP^, At !«• E-,mii St., Oakland ..... 
OILMAN, C. E.. 861 Calmar 

- IE, C. 431 Fnlsom St., 8. V For" 

FARRER, EDW. E„ 380 E. Simla Clai I., ■■ 

sr Bldg., S. F 
McCRACKEN. DR. it. W., 14th and Kirkhi 
MILLER, FRED. C. II . 226 I 'olore I SI i 

JACOBS : : , Stockton St., 3. F. 

■ EtANBTELD, A. J., 240 Noe St., s. F. . 

PALAD] I St., S, F. ... ,, ,, | 

BENNETT & CO., B. \\ . 2 Ith Si , S F (Vhlte 

McKAY. IT. I,,, 31 Bourl Ave., S. F i; ,,,1,1 

PACIFIC GAS & ELEC. CO., S. P. V 

LAKE, GEo. B., 1834 7th Ave., s. F 

AMES-HARRIS-NEV1L/LE CO., I 'otrero Lt , f i 

S, F. FIRE DEPT., City Hall, s P. r,,,, H 

iiawkins, liiiRi'.KRT 767 Mission si . s i 

K.UGHIN. J. C, 758 Harrison St., S, F 

STONE. C. H.. 623 Van Ness Ay<-., S. P I 'i, ,,„,, ., 

HAGEMANN, H. F,. 1227 Seventh Ave., S. F 

DREWES, F„ 1706 Chinch St. S F M,,,,, 

MANDLER CATERING CO., 115 13th St., Oakland Federal 

SWAN, F. H., 1026 Mill., Bldg., S. P Maruuetti 

* * * 

Don Lee, on his recent trip abroad, made quite a study of the 
road conditions, not only through the British Isles, but also 
through France and other parts of Europe. The roads were a 
revelation to him. In speaking of the highways Lee said : 

"To my mind, the success of foreign roads may be attributed 
to the solid foundations. They are well crowned and well 
ditched on both sides, and the work necessary to keep them in 
condition is comparatively small in comparison with the roads 
in the United States. 

"Undoubtedly these roads feel the effect of the motor car, 
yet it is not so much the natural deterioration caused by the au- 
tomobile as it is the increased travel. 

"With the coming of the automobile has come a much greater 
use of the highway. With the horse and wagon, a trip of thirty 
miles was a day's journey, while now the ordinary automo- 
bile owner in the same space of time covers over five times as 
great a distance; hence we have five times greater amount of 
wear and tear on the highways than before the advent of the 
modern vehicle. This is a most conservative estimate, for it 
must be acknowledged that where there was one user of the 
highways with the horse-drawn vehicle in days gone by, we 
have at least ten times as many users of the automobile. This 
would mean that highways that formerly had to stand a traffic 
of thirty miles now has to stand a traffic of 1500 miles, or in 
other words, fifty miles greater than in former days. 

"The increased use of the highways naturally means a 
quicker deterioration, and it is to combat this destruction that 
students of highway building all over the world are trying to 
solve some means to meet the demands made on the roads by 
this increased travel. 

"In England the National Automobile Club is doing great 
work in helping to keep the highways in condition. In England 
the tax on automobiles goes to help pay for the upkeep of the 
highways, and the National Automobile Club makes it its busi- 
ness to see that the money is properly expended for this use. 
The club keeps a corps of motorcycle men on the highways 
watching for deterioration, and in reporting the same at once 
to the club's home office. Not only do these men watch the 
road conditions, but warn motorists of the dangerous spots 
along the road, where repairs are being made or unusual con- 
ditions exist. The result is that those in authority over the 
roads are giving better service on account of this watchfulness, 
and the present perfect road conditions must be accredited to 
the club's activity. 

"A well crowned road between San Francisco and Los An- 
geles, well ditched on both sides, at the present time, will do 
more for the State just now than anything else that could be 
thought of. The visiting motorist to San Francisco desires to 
travel either northward or southward, but the report of the 
present road conditions deters him from making the journey. 

"A well built road of this kind would make it possible, for 
the twelve months of the year, to make this journey, and if this 
fact once became known, many motorists who are now spending 
their winters abroad would come westward for at least one sea- 
son to see "the" State of the Pacific Coast. We need good 
roads badly, and just as badly we need a good motor club, but 
one fact must be remembered that in both cases it takes money 
to get the results. The former case the State is providing by a 
beginning of $18,000,000, and those who are figuring on a motor 
club should remember that lasting results cannot be achieved 
on the small initiation fee and dues. If a club cannot be 
started on a highway financial plane with initiation fee and dues 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 




The Car With a Conscience 




, -sb* ■•».»• 'jam s-j?.^^.. '_■ ■ 




Model 45—7 Passenger Touring Car $2350 

HERE is a car of beauty, strength and power. 
It has created a new standard in motor car 
values. By comparison, higher-priced seven- 
passenger cars are found wanting and those of 
equal cost measure far below the pace set by this 
model. 

The individual design, the harmonious body 
lines, the graceful sweep, the roomy tonneau, the 
inside drive, the exclusiveness of the upholstering, 
are all in keeping with its unusual dignity and 
exceptional quietness. 

This car represents more than mere beauty, 
too. It represents a sound mechanical standard 
and the highest development of simplicity, re- 
liability and accessibility. 

OTHER OAKLAND MODELS 



Model "40" — Five-Passenger 
Touring Car at $1,650. In this 
model there Is brought out for 
the first time a car of superior 
design and construction, with 
sufficient power, at a medium 
price. 

Model "40"— "Sociable" Road- 
ster, $1,650. Entirely different 
from any motor car ever of- 
fered before In that it seats 
three persons side by side and 
allows the driver to give equal 
attention to his two guests. 



Model "30" — Five-Passenger 
Touring Car. $1,400. A car 
built to answer a large de- 
mand for a medium priced 
machine having sufficient 
power to take a party of five 
anywhere. 

Oakland "Oriole," $1,250— The 
smartest 30 horse-power Run- 
about on the market. Belongs 
In any garage where two or 
more cars are kept Equipped 
with a 30-gaUon gasoline tank. 



The Oakland Company's business is to give better service and to 
sell more cars. It will do its best to do both— tbey go hand in hand. 

The Oakland Motor Co. 

!-,.■-> c -.T Direct Factory Branch 
542-544 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 
Demonstrations of service on request 
Demonstrations of cars by appointment 
MOTOR CAR OWNERS CALLING AT THE SHOWROOMS WILL 
NOT BE IMPORTUNED 
Inquiries from leading dealers will be promptly answered 
Oakland Distributors and Service Bureau of Alameda County 
IMPERIAL GARAGE 1440-48 Webster St, Oakland 

PACIFIC MOTORS CO.. 6S2 Washington St.. Portland, Ore 

ARTHUR BUNKER CO.. 1431 Broadway. Seattle. Wash. 

U HAWLEY KING & CO.. 221 So. Los Angeles St.. Los Angeles. Cal. 



that will allow of the accumulation of a reserve fund, the club 
had better not be started. It will only result in disorganization 
when the low ebb comes, which always flows through the ex- 
istence of such associations. 

* * * 

The report of the registration at Sacramento for last week 
stated that nine hundred and thirty-four motor vehicles were 
registered with the Secretary of State. 

This means an investment of something like one million and 
a half dollars. In the face of this fact it is hard to believe some 
of the statements of a stringency in the local money market. 
The fact is, that some of the retail merchants who deal in 
novelties, and not strictly in necessities, are finding that their 
business is not as large as before the coming of the motor car. 

There is no question but what the public is giving up the en- 
joyment of novelties and a good many social affairs for the 
pleasure of motoring. While this curtails the trade with re- 
tail dealers, yet at the same time it creates business in other 
ways. 

The average business man is inclined to figure that the 
large expenditure for automobiles means a depreciation in the 
amount of money in the State, but this can hardly be true when 
it is considered that practically everything that is bought comes 
from the East, and merely the business profit of handling here 
remains in the city. 

While the buying is concentrated on the motor car instead of 
on novelties, entertainments and restaurants, it is, however, 
solving two of the great problems of the day, i. e., taxation and 
equalization of land values. 

With the perfection of the motor car, businessmen now re- 
side in the country, or what they are more pleased to call the 
suburbs. The motor car has brought any place within fifty 
miles of the big cities in reach of the businessman through the 
automobile, and practically they do not have to leave home 
much earlier than heretofore when residing within the city 
limits. 

The migration of the businessman to the country districts has 
raised land values where he is located, and decreased values 
in the cities, caused by his absence. It means a reduction in 
rents, which also means a reduction in values. This in time 
affects the taxation. It means a lowering of taxation in the city 
for State purposes, and increases the taxation in the country. 

While some are inclined to feel that the taxation in the coun- 
try is now as much as it should be, yet they do not realize that 
with the coming of the city man there is an increased business 
in the necessities of life. Money that was heretofore spent in 
the city for living is now paid to the farmer and country mer- 
chant. They find a demand for a higher class of necessities, 
which in turn always means a better profit. We therefore have 
here a partial solution of two problems. 

In looking over the registration, it is seen that most of the 
cars registered are from the country districts or the minor 
towns. The registration in the larger cities is in the minority, 
showing that the farmer and those who live adjacent to the big 
cities are using the motor car more freely than the city man. 
In the list of names of owners, however, can be seen many who 
are connected with business enterprises of the larger cities. This 
supports the statement that the city man is now moving out 
into the fresh air of the country with his family instead of re- 
maining within the city walls. 

While this is evident in California, yet it is not so pronounced 
as it is in the East. California does not know what the tenement 
district means. We do not have to figure out laws to prohibit 
the over-crov/ding of the houses in the poorer districts. 

The motor car, in taking the middle and more richer class out 
into the country to live, as in the larger cities of the East, 
placed many homes on the rent market. Rents have been re- 
duced, and those who have been heretofore forced to live in 
tenements now find more desirable places to live, at rents within 
their means. 

The passing of tenement houses has been a boon to business, 
for previously a house carrying one hundred families would 
produce rents far in excess of what the same building would 
produce for business purposes. Now that the tenements are 
scattering to the unoccupied houses, landlords are remodeling 
their buildings for business purposes, which pays better rents 
than they command for tenements. 
Here, while the poor mar. is not able to enjoy the motor car, 



July 6. 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



he is, however, enjoying a better condition in life through the 
coming of the modern vehicle, and if we were to study all the 
civic questions of the day we could find in every particular 
that the motor car is bettering conditions. 

Some may claim that the motor car is hurting business, but 
this is only in a few cases, while the general good that it is do- 
ing is more far reaching and overshadows any destruction of 
business that may be found in a few particular cases. 

* * * 

Mr. W. L. Hughson, president of the Standard Motor Car 
Company, Mr. E. W. A. Waterhouse, and their families, spent 
Sunday touring over one of the finest highways in California in 
Mr. Hughson's big Silent Knight. The party crossed the bay 
to Sausalito, driving from there through beautiful Ross Valley, 
from which an excellent view of San Pablo Bay may be had. 
Thence to San Anselmo, continuing over White's Hill, through 
the famous redwoods to Camp Taylor. From Camp Taylor the 
party drove to Olema and Tocaloma, at that point making a 
sharp turn to the left, traveling a perfect road to Inverness, with 
Tomaies Bay to one side and dense woods on the other, with 
the Pacific in stately relief. Again turning to the left at In- 
verness, an ideal highway leads to the Waters Company prop- 
erties, at the end of which may be found an excellent spot for 
an out-door luncheon. By walking a short distance one is af- 
forded an opportunity of viewing a miniature Niagara, known 
as The Falls. This gem of Nature is well worth the trip in it- 
self. The party covered a total distance of seventy miles, just 
a comfortable Sunday tour, with roads par excellence and natu- 
ral wonders galore. 

* * * 

Mr. W. P. Hardy and Mr. J. R. Gay of Selma, Alabama, ar- 
rived in San Francisco last Monday morning, after having cov- 
ered a distance of five thousand miles in their Chalmers "30" 
car. Mr. Hardy and Mr. Gay left Alabama in the early part of 
April, and intend to make a tour of the United States, to last 
about six months. They went first from their home in Ala- 
bama to Detroit, and thence to San Francisco, covering the en- 
tire distance in the remarkable actual running time of 37^ 
days. Both gentlemen are high in their praises of the Chalmers 
car, stating that during the entire trip they experienced no 
mechanical trouble of any kind, not even having had to grind 
the valves, and they traveled over roads in such a condition that 
it was disheartening; in fact, the roads were so bad that once 
they were upon the point of giving up and returning home, and 
Mr. Hardy and Mr. Gay are not novices at touring, having the 
year previous covered about 12,000 miles in this same Chalmers 
— touring the eastern portion of the United States. From San 
Francisco the travelers will go to Los Angeles, and from there 
to Kansas City and back home. 

* • • 

Manager R. K. Roberts, of the Howard Automobile Company, 
this week received a telegram from Ernest H. Mack, stating 
that he and D. F. Pope and Mr. Ironsides made the trip in their 
big National car from San Francisco to Reno in nine hours and 
fifty-two minutes, having beaten their time on the down trip 
from Reno to San Francisco on Wednesday last, which was ten 
hours and thirty minutes, still further lowering their record 
twenty-eight minutes. 

When it is considered that in a number of places large boul- 
ders from the mountains are encountered at this season of the 
year after the winter's snows and rains, the time made by the 
famous National is all the move remarkable. 

Congratulations are due the driver for his nerve, and to the 
car which afforded him the opportunity to establish the up and 
down records between San Francisco and Reno and reverse. 

• * * 

Mr. H. E. Maslin, vice-president of the Standard Motor Car 
Company, with his family and party of friends, made the cen- 
tury run Sunday in a handsome new Stoddard-Dayton Touring 
car. The motorists drove to Palo Alto, where the Stanford 
University was visited; thence to Los Gatos, stopping for 
luncheon at Nippa Buena, a delightful summer resort nestling 
in the foothills off the traveled road. Taking up their journey 
once more, the party motored to San Jose, returning to Oakland 
via Fruitvale. San Leanoro, Niles and Haywards. 



Worth While 
Your Attention 

Regal Model T "25" Underslung Touring Car 

UNDER a thousand dollars — 
Twenty - five horse power- 
Comfortably seating five pas- 
sengers. A veritable challenge to 
competition. An "Underslung" 
with all the advantages of "safety," 
"economy," "beauty," "accessibility," 
"comfort" this costly construction 
assures. 

A Touring Car that will amaze you by 
its ability, its flexibility and its absolute 
sufficiency for any and every purpose 
—speed— endurance— hill climbing. 

Compare it— Match it— Value against 
Value. 

Let the car do justice to the good 
things we haven't said about it. 

Some Specifications: 



Motor, 25 H. P., 334x<n/ 2 Inches; 
Wheel Base, 106 Inches; Mag- 
neto and Batteries (dual Igni- 
tion): Transmission (Selective) 
Highest Grade Nickel Steel, 3 
speeds forward, one reverse; 
Morgan & Wright Tires 32x3'/ 2 



Inches; Standard Equipment, 
Five Lamps; Generator; Horn; 
Complete Tool Equipment (Fold- 
ing Glass Windshield and Mo- 
hair Top and Top Boot, $50 ex- 
tra.) 




$950 

The Regal "25" Underslung Touring Car 

REGAL MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

Automobile Manufacturers, DETROIT, MICH. 
San Francisco and Oakland Agents 

Frank O. Renstrom Company 



(THE HOUSE OF SERVICE! 



Van Ness and Golden Gate Ares. 
Twelfth and Jackson Sts. 



San Francisco, Cal, 
Oakland, Cal. 



Dealers Everywhere 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 






NDERSLUNG 



1913 



"American Traveler" (Type 56-A) $4500 

Six passengers. Wheel base, 140 inches: tire, 41 \ 4'i front and rear on demountable rims. 

FULL EQUIPMENT INCLUDES: Electrical starting and lighting ($150) outfit complete with storage battery, supplying 
all five lamps; $90 Warner combination clock and 100 mile speedometer; handsome plate-glass windshield; line Mohair top. top 
boot and storm curtains; hij, r h -tension magneto and storage battery with single unit cotl; two extra rims: shock absorbers: 
foot rest; robe-rail; horn; jack; tire pump; complete tool kit and tire repair outfit. 



YOU seldom bear any one dispute the manifold practical advantages of the 
AMERICAN Underslum motor car. nor the beauty of its low body lines. 
Engineers the world over concede its superiority. 
1 The AMERICAN Underslung has no competition. The dealer who handles it 
has everything to talk about that his competitor has not. Every AMERICAN 
point is a distinct AMERICAN selling point. No other can claim the safety and 
economy. No other can give the tow stylish striking body design. 
1 The AMERICAN is ihe only really different car made. Take any other ten 
high grade cars and they all look and act precisely alike. The line of a door 



Sub-Agencies 

American Motors' 



476 Golden Gate Avenue 
GRUNDY MOTOR SALES CO. 
842 S. Olive St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



might be different, or the hood might have a different slope, BUT FUNDAMENT- 
ALLY THEY ARE ALL ALIKE, AND THEREIN IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 
THE AMERICAN UNDERSLUNG AND ALL OF THE OTHERS. 
1 There are three types— one to fit the purse of every possible purchaser. Re- 
member, every practical and attractive AMERICAN point is a point you can do 
business on and one that you have absolutely no competition on. 
1 Write at once for full particulars and specifications of the easiest selling high 
grade car in America, and for our booklet entitled "The Advantages of Under- 
slung Construction." Every dealer in America should have these facts. 

Solicited, Apply 

California Company 

San Franciaco, Cal. 
NOB HILL GARAGE & AUTO CO. 
690 Kearney St., Portland, Ore. 





"American Tourist" (Type34-A> $2350 

e. IIS inchei; tires, 37 s a front and rear on y, D. •lemountatl- rim* 
FULL EQUIPMENT INCLUDES: Ekctric light generator and battery complete .applying all fire 
lamp* (SljO outfit); handsome plate glas. windthtcld; $:,0 Warner 60-mil t ,|. C rdomete r : Di.co mU- 
•tarter; fine Mohair top, top boot and »torm curtaim: full nicke' trimming.; high ten-i^n mait- 
B«fc> »ad rtOMge batterr w;ai BinnlE 2ait coil me .xtn r: 2 ahock abi;rberi: fcot raat robe ra'l 
> repair oolfit. 



Pourlpeaienger. 



horn; jack; lire pump; eomjilete tool kit and tir 



"American Scout" (Type 22-A) $1475 

Tw<. paasengcra. Wheel base. lOj'inehei: Una, 3S*i 81-2 all around on Q. D. demountable rim. 
FULL EQUIPMENT INCLUDES: *M Wamcr oO-mlle .peedomeler ; liandiome plate glara windahield: 
Disco self-starter; doe mohair top, top boot and sloim coitalns; full nickel tr'nunlDlli daih and 
tail light, i-lectrlc supplied by large storage lattery; handscme |*s head lights and Fieel-O-lile 
tank ; hicti taulOO mafllrto and ItOTIge bollery with »in|lc nnil ci ii; i ne e*tra rim; I" I 
tiro.pump; complete tool kit and tiro lepair outfit. 



July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



In fitting an inner tube, care should be taken that nothing re- 
mains in the envelope. Tire men not infrequently suffer 
criticism for supplying inferior tubes when the fact is that it is 
the motorist who is at fault. The Michelin tire expert says that 
frequently owners leave dust caps, washers and other articles 
inside an envelope and then complain when the inner tube 
punctures from "no apparent cause," after a few miles of 
traveling. Keep dust caps and other parts removed for tire 
fitting on a bit of waste on the step or on the seat of the car, or 
in some other place where they can be found when wanted, 
and where they cannot get inside the tire by any possible 
chance. Use does not injure tires. Like the human family, it 
is idleness that destroys them. An inner tube hanging in a 
garage all winter will be ruined by spring. Its companion tube 
which is working daily remains flexible, elastic and fresh. 

It is the same with an envelope or casing. A tire neglected 
on the roof of a limousine, exposed to the sun, is baked and 
ruined, but the envelope on the car has nothing to fear from 
the same sun rays that destroyed its idle neighbor. 



The Remy Electric Company, Anderson, Ind., makers of the 
famous Remy magneto, announces the appointment of W. H. 
Lolley, of London, Eng., as an engineer in the Service Depart- 
ment. Mr. Lolley is well known in America. On his arrival in 
the States he joined the forces of the Remy Electric Company, 
and later became one of the staff of the Connecticut Shock Ab- 
sorber Company, remaining there until his return to the Ander- 
son ignition factory. 



Having successfully negotiated the vicissitudes of the desert, 
another "Stoddard-Dayton Saybrook" touring car, owned by 
Mr. W. S. White, of Weatherford, Texas, breezed into San 
Francisco recently, the speedometer touching at thirty-two hun- 
dred miles covered in exactly five weeks, including stops at 
Colorado Springs, Denver, Salt Lake City, Cheyenne, Reno and 
Lake Tahoe. The party included three young men, Mr. White 
and Barney Holland of Weatherford, and L. Scarbraugh of Aus- 
tin, Texas. 




"Alwan Tbtrt" 
SPLITDORF SERVICE goes arm In arm with 
SPLITDORF IGNITION— and has been a continuous 
SPLITDORF POLICY for more than two decades. 
From the earliest days of colts and pluos and 
through every stage of Ignition service, SPLIT- 
DORF ha? been synonymous with SERVICE. 
If YOU DO NOT BENEFIT from this SERVICE, 
the fault is your own. Our experts are at your call 
— our branches, which are miniature factories In 
equioment, are scattered throughout the country 
and our inflexible rule Is— "SATISFY THE CUS- 
TOrt ER." 

Com*: to us with your ignition troubles — we will 
gladly shoulder all responsibilities for changes and 
adjustments and guarantee the greatest satis- 
faction. 

Write for our "Racing Record" 

Splitdorf Electrical Company 

Pacific Coast Branch 
430-36 Van Ness A.ve. San Francisco 



tttUlii Ithlili 



EMPIRE TWENTY -FIVE 

THE LITTLE ARISTOCRAT 

The touring car that looks like a small $5,000.00 car and sells for $850. 
It's the famous Empire Roadster's BIG BROTHER. 

Specifications make the Empire "25," the most aristocratic little car in 
America. Write for details. 
THE EMPIRE AUTOMOBILE CO. Lit. Massachusetts St.. Indianapolis. U. S. A 



FOR SALE 1910 Wlnton Automobile. Perfect condition, fully equipped. 

Warner Speedometer; top; glass front; clock; tire irons; trunk rack; 
Prest-o-Llte tank; electric and oil lamps; two horns — bulb and electric; 
two tire covers; two extra tires; two extra tubes. Address: Owner, 21 
Sutter St. 'Phone Kearny 3594. 



1912 



"THE BEST OF THE GOOD ONES" 

VE LI E 

40 H. P., 4-Passenger Torpedo HAS ARRIVED 



1912 




40 H. P. 4-PASSENGER TORPEDO 



FULLY EQUIPPED $2200 



All 1912 Velie Motor Cars will be fully equipped and will include in addition to Top, Glass Front and Speedometer, 
as Standard Equipment, the Velie Self-Starter and Vesta Electric Lighting System. 

VELIE MOTOR VEHICLE COMPANY, Moline, 111. 

AGENCIES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES 

AUTO SALES COMPANY, san francisco 



MAX U ROSENFELD, President 



Service Dept., 419 Larkin Street 



418 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 



Ride The 

WINNING TIRES 

City Contracts for Approximately $25,000 

Worth of Them 

The city of Seattle has contracted 
with us to equip city automobiles 
with 

AJAX TIRES 

This contract was awarded on 
guaranteed mileage, price and 
pure merit of the Glidden 
Trophy winners. 

Sometimes "the expected" hap- 
pens; always, when AJAX TIRES 
are used "the desired" is realized. 

Best Tires in the World for Touring 

HUGHSON & MERTON 



Pacific Coast Distributors 



530 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

LOS ANGELES PORTLAND 



SAN FRANCISCO 

SEATTLE-9M E. PIKE ST 



A. B. C. 

Anti-Puncture Tire Fluid 

will positively stop punctures 
in your tire. Eliminates all 
trouble such as nails, tacks 
and slow leaks. 
Guaranteed not to rot or injure the tube. Will 
outlast the tire. Costs $7.50 for tires 34x4 or 
under, or $10.00 for tires 34x4 or larger. 

Call at 606 Van Ness Ave. for Demonstration 
JAMES BOGUE. Sales Manager 




^^ Motor i 



Motor Cars 

The Thsmas 8. Jeffery Company of California. 285 Geary Street, San Francisco 



According to Col. A. W. Bradbury, of the Pacific Motor Car 
Company, the new Stevens-Duryea factory will have the fol- 
lowing: "Water-proof floors to prevent not only leakage but 
the penetration of even dampness, and dust-proof construction 
throughout. These are two of the unusual features which mark 
the new Stevens-Duryea factory at East Springfield, Mass., as 
the highest development of modern factory building. When 
completed, the plant will be one of the finest industrial estab- 
lishments in the world. 

"The buildings of the new Stevens-Duryea plant are all to be 
very large in ground area, but restricted in height, to save hav- 
ing to lift and lower partly finished cars. The first of the brick 
and steel structures, into which the company is about moving 
now, is 508 feet long with a frontage of 80 feet on the broad 
boulevard, which is one boundary of the forty-acre tract the 
model Stevens-Duryea plant will occupy. It is only four stories 
high, but each floor having an area of 40,000 square feet of 
available space, this one building gives as much working room 
as many good sized factories have all told. 

"It is proposed in the new plant to greatly enlarge the com- 
pany's body-building facilities, installing high pressure hydrau- 
lic presses to make interchangeable parts of bodies so that they 

can be standardized." 

* * * 

Word comes to the Standard Motor Car Company of a forty- 
five days' trip just made by Mr. F. A. Hinz, assistant manager of 
the Western Feed Company, of this city, in a Stoddard-Dayton 
touring car. 

During this time he covered 3166 miles, going over the worst 
roads throughout the State between San Francisco and the 
Mexican border. He went down through the San Joaquin Val- 
ley and over the Tehachapi Pass via Tejon Pass, between 
Bakersfield and Los Angeles, and returned from San Diego via 
the Casitas Pass and the coast line. 

During this trip, Mr. Hinz was, on account of his business, 
obliged to go off the regular roads, taking in practically every 
poultry ranch between San Francisco and San Diego. In some 
places there were no roads at all. He did not have any engine 
trouble whatever during the whole trip, and the Stoddard-Day- 
ton car acquitted itself perfectly, and went through the trip 
without a scratcn. Mr. Hinz is loud in his praise of the easy- 
riding qualities of the car, feeling no fatigue after his strenuous 
tour. 

* * * 

Manager R. K. Roberts, of the Howard Automobile Company, 
has been advised by the National Vehicle Company, manu- 
facturers of the National cars, that the Nationals will not be en- 
tered any more in racing events during the year 1912. The an- 
nouncement comes after due consideration by the National offi- 
cials, and did not surprise any one connected with the trade, as 
the National cars have been such consistent winners for the 
past few years that such action was rather expected by those 
familiar with the situation. 

The announcement is made of the entry of a National car in 
the races at Tacoma, July 4th and 5th. The car is entered by a 
private owner, with which the factory or its local distributors 
have nothing to do. 

FOR SALE.— Autocar Runabout, with top. lamps and generator, In good 
condition. Price $160. Apply 21 Sutter street. 




Renault 

"The Car," 

New Types at New Prices 

NOW ON EXHIBITION AT 

RENAULT FRERES SELLING 
BRANCH, Inc. 



Telephone Market 7038 



116-120 VAN NESS AVENUE 



San Francisco 



July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



— — "I understand that Mr. Grabwell started in life by bor- 
rowing $50. You must admire a man with courage like that." 
"No, I don't," replied Mr. Growclier; "the man I admire is the 
one who had the courage to lend him the fifty." — Washington 
Star. 



Save Repairs 



Save Money Save Trouble 



by replacing worn out Bearintrs with the world re- 
nowned HESS-BRIGHTS. AH sizes carried In stock 




Pacific Coast Distributors 

Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co., Inc. 

H. D. McCOY, Sec. & Treas 
Los Angeles San Francisco Seattle Fresno Portland Spokane 



Rex Metal Cream 

The Kins Polish 

Not because it possesses any 
one particular advantage but 
because It possesses all — some 
of them exclusive. 



REX METAL CREAM gives 
maximum service. It goes further 
and gives a more brilliant and dur- 
able polish than any other polish 
on the market. It never scratches 
the metal or Injures the hands 

For Sale By 
ALL JOBBERS 




Faulty Lubrication— What it Costs You 

Poor lubricating oil Is cheaply made of Inferior products. It contains 
elements that are Injurious to the engine. It produces soot-deposits 
which choke valves, corrode spark plugs and gum cylinders. Your car 
loses power— effectiveness. It goes to the repair shop and you lose the 
use of It and receive a goodly bill for repairs. 

Perfect Lubrication— What it Saves You 

HARRIS 

OILS 

Have been on the market twenty-five years. 
This experience has enabled us to eliminate 
to the greatest extent the soot-deposit in- 
gredients. 

HARRIS OILS increase mileage with less oil 
consumption. They possess "body." They 
enable you to get full power out of your motor, 
decrease the smoke nuisance and greatly add 
to the efficiency of your car. 

In gallon and five gallon sealed cans 
and in barrels. Ask your dealer or 
garage man for HARRIS OILS. 

A. W. HARRIS OIL COMPANY 

Pacific Coast Distributors 

Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co., Inc. 

H. D. McCOY, Sec. and Treas. 

LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 

SEATTLE rRESNO PORTLAND SPOKANE 




RELIABLE BRAKES AND BRAKE LINING 



D 



u 

EXTERNAL 
B RAKE Si 




DUPLEX Brakes make for safety. They 
give security. They act immediately. 
Slight pressure does it. They possess 
maximum braking surface. Made by the 
leading brake builders of the industry. 
Get a set for your car. We build brakes 
to order. Send your specifications. 





REG 



US. PAT. OFF 



RAYBESTOS is preeminently the best lining 
and friction facing. It's the original as- 
bestos lining. It gives highest co-efficient 
of friction and because of the genuine, long 
fiber asbestos used in its manufacture— out- 
lasts and outwears "ordinary" lining, two to 
one. Sold in all widths and the name 
RAYBESTOS is stamped in each foot of lining 
as your guarantee. 
We also make Ra>mond Brakes and (i>r<'\ Mixer 

THE ROYAL EQUIPMENT CO. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 



CHANSLOR & LYON MOTOR SUPPLY COMPANY. Inc. 




San FrjDOM-o 



Pacific Coast Distributor) 
Lo* Angeles Spokane Fresno Seattle Portland 



Guaranteed Tires at Half Price 




would net be worth as 
much to you as WOOD- 
WORTH TREADS ; for 
Woodworth Treads will 
cut down your tire cost 
per mile of running to 
one-half, and at the same 
time will give you pro- 
tection from punctures 
and skidding which bare 
tires cannot give. Re- 
member that Woodworth 
Treads are guaranteed 
not to injure the tires. 

The coil spring method 
of fastening keeps the 
treads absolutely tight, so 
that there Is no danger 
whatever of looseness to 
cause chafing and heating 
of the tires. 

Send for 1912 catalog 
showing the reduced 
prices and free booklet on 
the Preservation of Tires. 



Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co., Inc. 



Los Angeles 
Seattle 



San Francisco 
Fresno 



Portland 
Spokane 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 



DISCO Self -Starters 

Over Thirty Thousand in Service 

Adopted by Forty American and Five European Factories. 
Can be fitted to and will make any car Self-Startine in a few 
hours' time. INSIST ON A 



DISCO 



IMPORTANT— Owners of Ford. Buick, and 
other cars not equipped with priming cup: — We 
now furnish without extra cost special two-way 
guaranteed Starter Spark Plugs, making these 
cars as easy to equip as any other with the Disco 



WE WANT LIVE AGENTS IN YOUR TERRITORY. 



WRITE FOR 



DISCO 



PARTICULARS 

PACIFIC 



COMPANY 



603 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 



THE CHAMPION WIND SHIELD 

IS GUARANTEED 




Glass Fronts For All Types of Automobiles 
HIGHEST QUALITY GREATEST STRENGTH 

Champion Wind Shield Mfg. Co. 



Eddy and Larkin Sts. 



San Francisco 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Call on us when you want photographs of any kind. 
We car. and will please you. Our new studio, the 
largest west of New York, covers 9,000 square feet of 
floor space and is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. You are cordially invited to call and 
we will be very glad to take you through the different 
departments,, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging, 
Kodak, etc. You will be Interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO., 
Everything In Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phones — Franklin 1184. Home C 4084 



Expert Automobile Washing and Polishing 
By SKILLED Workmen 

Only the very best automobile soaps, 
new and clean sponges and chamois 
used. Day Service a Specialty. 



E. R. WOLFKIEL, Van Ness Ave. .1 Golden Gate Ave. 
Phone Franklin 2399 



Arthur H. Berncit. known familiarly to nearly every man, 
woman and child in Indiana as "Cotton," will become assistant 
manager of the Indianapolis branch of the Remy Electric Com- 
pany, on September 1, 1912. "Cotton" is an Indianapolis boy, 
an athletic star and graduate of the Manual Training School of 
that city. On leaving this institution of learning, "Cotton" hied 
himself to Indiana University at Bloomington. 

Feeling that the commercial life offered a larger field for his 
energies, he joined the forces of the Anderson, Ind., factory, 
where the record holding Remy magneto is manufactured. To- 
day the famous hero of the gridiron, the gym. floor and the dia- 
mond, is busily engaged in learning the A B C's of magneto 
construction. Clad in grimy overalls, and seated at a bench in 
the repair shop, the athlete is taking a course in mechanics, that 
he may be able to cope with and meet the problems of market- 
ing the machine that provides the vital spark for countless 
motor driven vehicles. 

* * * 

The National cars simply cannot help making records, the 
latest of which was made last week by Ernest Mack, National 
and Buick distributor of National and Buick cars for Nevada. 
Mr. Mack, accompanied by three iriends, started from Reno 
on Tuesday morning for a jaunt to San Francisco in their big 
National, and with the exception of one or two places, they 
found the roads in most excellent condition, and in many spots 
could give the big car a wide open throttle, and reel miles at 
the rate of fifty to sixty miles per hour. The distance from 
Reno to San Francisco is 282 miles, which Mack covered in ten 
and a half hours, which, considering the slowing down of the 
speed burner, is the record time between the two cities. Mr. 
Mack reports business in the Gold State as most promising for 
the automobile business of the future, and is preparing to place 
big orders, as he did last Spring, when carloads were the order 

of the day. 

* * * 

A telegram received by R. K. Roberts, manager of the How- 
ard Automobile Company from Cincinnati, Ohio, announces 
that the Buick cars made a clean sweep at the big meet in that 
city. Following is an exact copy of the wire : 

"Buick model M 35 wins 16 to 230 class Stanley Avenue Hill 
climb, defeating Herreshoff, Flanders, Motz, R. C. H., two El- 
mores, Paige-Detroit, Cole, Stutz and Ohio. Buick model 43 
also wins free for all, defeating the entire field, including two 
Ohios, two Cinos, two Elmores, one Cole, White Six, Chadwick 
Six and Stutz, an annual event distance of 2340 feet, with ten 
and eleven per cent grade. Time, twenty-nine and two-fifths 
seconds. Buicks make clean sweep of everything. Ideal 
weather. Immense crowds." 

* * * 

That American made cars are becoming popular in Russia is 
evidenced by the fact that the Nyberg Automobile Works of 
Anderson, Indiana, have just received an order for twenty-five 
Nyberg Six-60 models from Count Nicholas Koushnetzoif of St. 
Petersburg, Russia. A short time ago the Nyberg Company 
sent two of their cars to the Count, and as a result received this 
large order. Part of the cars are to go to Odessa and the re- 
mainder to St. Petersburg. 



"Is it true that your daughter has married a highbrow, 

Mrs. Rockingham?" "No; that story was started by some of 
the girls who are jealous. Daisie's husband is a writer, but 
his royalties amount to over $40,000 a year." — Chicago Record- 
Herald. 



ST. FRANCIS GARAGE 

Under the Management of the 

FRANCIS BROS. AUTO RENTAL CO. 

Announce the Opening of One of the Finest and Most 
Up-To-Date Oarages in the City. 

Conveniently located POST STREET, bet. Polk and Van Ness 

Phone Sutter 1010 

Thoroughly Fire-Proof, Situated in a Clasa A Building 

Inspection Invited 1912 6-CYLINDER PEERLESS FOR HIRE 



July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



33 



Mosler 



are the best 
A.R.Mosler fir Co. 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Western Representative 

ALFRED H.COATES 

444 Market Street 

San Francisco 

Cal. 



Guarantee Battery Co. 


630 Van Ness Ave. 


162 5 Pacific Ave. 


Phone Franklin 2772 


PHONES: 




Franklin 1510 C 4760 


"Elite" BATTERIES 


High Grade 


Batteries Charged and 


ELECTRIC 


Overhauled 


VEHICLE 


Automobile Wiring 
Electric Accessories 


GARAGE 


Electrobola Head and 


Expert Exclusive 


Side-Lights 


Electrical Vehicle Charging 


Coil Repairing 


and Repairing 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States, Canada and Europe 

AETNA INSURANCE CO. 

OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH— 325 California Street, San Francisco 



FISK 

TIRES 



"THE STANDARD 

OF QUALITY" 

Made to fit 
all 3tyle rims 

For Sale by All Dealers 



MONAMOBILE 

That ONE Best Oil 

251 Minna St., San Francisco. Phone Sutter 2031 



NO OTHER HIGH POWERED CAR APPROACHES 

THE .MARALO-N 

* Th« Eul*4l Riding C*i- b\ Th* World " 

5J 6 FrONOMY Telephone 

Golden Gate Ave. Lj\.KJViUm. 1 Franklin 4143 



Firestone 

TIRES AND DEMOUNTABLE RIMS 
THE FIRESTONE TIRE AND RUBBER CO. Cor. Via Ness and F.ltoa. San Francisco 



SHAWMUT 
TIRES 



The Tires that have proved 
BEST 

TANSEY- CROWE 
AUTO SUPPLY 

345 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 
CYPRESS LODGE, BELMONT.— Phone Belmont 111. Touring informa- 
tion. Mnals at all hours. Our specialty, steaks and broils, cold lunches. 
Private dining rooms. Thoroughly equipped bar. 
NELSON & JOHNSON. Propr. 



REDWOOD CITY.— REDWOOD CITY GARAGE, 701 Mound St. Mllier 
Paulsen, Prop. Vulcanizing, gasoline and oils. Complete machine shop. 
Repairs and al'. work guaranteed. Tel. Black 293. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladies In connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" gar age next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

SAN JOSE.— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE, Market and St James 
street. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire-proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler, Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE, 443 Emmerson St. Tel., P. A. 
333. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries in stock. Gasoline, oil, 
repairing, lathe work, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 

PALO ALTO.— LARKIN'S CAFE— lust opened. The only strictly first- 
ciass cafe on the Wishbone Route devoted to the patronage of automobile 
owners and their families. Corner of University avenue and The Circle. 

GILROY.— "FOWLER'S" GARAGE, North Main St. Phone 1153. Rent 
cars at all hours. Tires and sundries in stock; gasoline, oil, repairing, 
lathe work, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 
SANTA CRUZ.— CENTRAL GARAGE; autos for hire; general repairing; 
cars stored. Phone S. C. 446. 25-27-29 Soquel Ave. BEACH GARAGE, 
cor. First and Cliff Sts. Phone S. C. 552. Opposite Casa Del Rey. E. A. 
Noyes & Son, Props. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 
SAN LUIS OBISPO.— CALIFORNIA GARAGE. A. Luchessa, Proprie- 
tor. Dealer in Automobiles and Bicycles. Repairs and supplies. Every- 
thing complete. Building fire-proof. 879-881 Hlguera St., San Luis 
Obispo, Cal. rnone 789 R. 

LAKE COUNTY. 
LAKEPORT.— LAKEPORT GARAGE. Vulcanizing, 
Gasoline and lubricants. First-class machine work. 
Postofnce. F. E. Watklns, Prop. Phone Main 521. 



batteries charged. 
One block from 



SONOMA COUNTY. 
HEALDSBURG.— FITCH MOUNTAIN GARAGE. Robinson & Groshong, 
Props. F. L. Robinson, Phone 221 J. Sid Groshong, Phone 220 J; General 
rent and garage service. First class auto repair work; full line of supplies. 

GUERNEVILLE.— GUERXEV1LLE GARAGE. Automobiles for hire. 
Gasoline, oils and automobile supplies. Main street. Guerneville, in rear 
of City Livery Stables. Phone Main 153. R. N. Tunstall, Prop. 

CLOVERDALE.— WARREN'S GARAGE. Geo. F. Warren, Prop. Fully 
equipped blacksmith and machine shop, Studebaker headquarters; tires in 
stock; supplies ami repairs. Upper West St., Cloverdale. Phone Main 221. 

SANTA ROSA. — Houts Auto Co., Mendocino Ave., one-half block north 
of Court House. Expert automobile repairing, supplies, tires, oils and 
gasoline. Open day and night. Telephone 527. Agents Overland, Stod- 
dard-Dayton, 



Klssel-Kar. 



PETALUMA.— PETALUMA GARAGE. Sparks & Murphy, Proprietors. 
General machine work. Supplies, repairing and auto livery; lubricating 
alls and gasoline. Corner Third and C streets. Tel. Petaluma 3. 

LAKE COUNTY. 
HIGHLAND SPRINGS.— Garage, gasoline (30c. per gallon), olli 
machine work. Phone, Highland Springs. 
of automobilists. Meals at all hours. 



light 
Special attention to comfort 




Model 48. $1750 



THE MARION 

Marion Motors Co. 

489 Golden Gate Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO 



EASTERN REPAIR CO. 

Telephones: Market 1264 Home S 2631 J. WILLIAMS 

Repairers of AUTO RADIATORS AND LAMPS 



HOODS. FENDERS. DUST PANS MANUFACTURED. 
AND ALL KINDS OF SHEET METAL 



675 Golden Gate Avenae. naar Franklin 



San Franriico 



Vulcanizing 



PEART & ELKINGTON 

Phone Market (470. 

42 Van Ness Avenue. San Francisco, Cal. 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 



If you want to prolong the life 
of your engine, 

If you want to eliminate smoke 
and carbon, 
j\ /[ rr\ r^v t If you want to reduce your oil 

MoToRoL -~ 

Use MoToRoL 
''It suits because it doesn't soot" 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 


BEST IN THE 

GOODRICH long RUN 
TIRES 

THE B. F. GOODRICH 
CO., of California 

556-558 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco 


Full factory equipment on all Pack- 

,i f , ards, Oldsmobiles, Coles, Thomas and 

HOOVtK Seven others. Absolutely perfect. 

Full set of four— $14 to $iS. Under 

A 1 IX II 1ARY SPRINC. & compression by heavy loads, rough 

AUMUAKI arrcilNU C* roads or bumps. Under all conditions 

rides as easy as on asphalt. Impos- 
SHOCK ABSORBER sible to break springs. No competition 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 
Polk and Fulton Sts., San Francisco 


GOODYEAR THE ^TeaTt.re and 

NO RIM CUT RUBBER CO. 

TIRP^ 161-363 Golden Gate Avenue 
11IXC "-' San Francisco, Cal. 


'F'y-prr'R'-p p. j. krug 

425-431 Golden Gate Ave. 
A TTTAH/rrvDTT T7 San Francisco 
A.U 1 OJYLO.Dl.Li.Ili Woodworking. Blaeksmithine 

and every known repair for 
P> AT'NT'TT'N'n- the automobile 
± -n-l-l-V X J.11 \J A!1 work Guaranteed 


Machinists and Engineers 

If'CCMAM RDf"lC Automobile Repairing a Specialty 
IXCCINAIN DIAUO. 350 Golden Gate Avenue, bet. Hyde 

and Lai kin Streets 
Phones: Franklin 6823. Home J 201a 


FREE FROM CARBON 
PANHARD U H. & B. I. BILE 

/^TT 543 Golden Gate Ave. 
^"*^ — ' San Francisco. Cal. 


AMERICAN THERMOS BOTTLE 

THERMOS company 

Thermos Building. New York City 
BOTTLES, CARAFES " ni 

MOGENSON WELLS CO. 

And LUNCH KITS Phelan Bide.. San Francisco 


Call and Investigate 

I\CLL I - K.AL>llN C CHANSLOR St LYON MOTOR 

SUPPLY CO. 

1 1 lYCO 5°i Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 


MONOGRAM New York Lubricatin e Co - 

Retail 401 Golden Gate Ave. 
Offices & Warehouse 516 2d St. 

OIL, GEORGE P. MOORE 

Pacific Coast Representative 


Why Don't You Try Our Others have and find it gives as 

U N-GUARANTEED much ^ZltZTT" Ure *' 

nnnilTAD PRUDENTIAL RUBBER CO. 
UlDKnLlAK Akron Ohio. U. :>. A. 

yjpcrg W. D. NEWERF RUBBER CO. 
535 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 


niA MriMn Glve Greaies ' MMe "* e 

LMAiVlOlN U THE DIAMOND RUBBER CO. 

of New York 
J llXCO C. E. Mathewson. Pacific Coast M^r. 
San Francisco, Cal. 


REMY REMY ELECTRIC CO. 

MAHNFTO 170 Golden Gate Ave. 
!Tirv\_»HJ_, 1 W San Francisco, Cal. 


PAPIPIP The Lareest Automobile Repair Shop 

rnt-^ir it_- , nthe Wes , 
AUTOMOBILE ALL , w G °f d K ™™™™ 

<3o Golden Gate Avenue 
CV/^OAMr-t: San Francisco, Cal. 
tALMAlNUt CORREJACARS 


MOHRIG BROS. 

Automobile Accessories 

SPARK PLUGS 824 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco Cal. 


TIRP VI II PA IMI 71 IMP All Work Guaranteed 

iirvc vuL^nniiiiiu mctarnahan vulcanizing 

ANin IflRRlNP & TIRE COMPANY 
n\VU JUDDI11U 630 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 


PENNSYLVANIA PENNSYLVANIA 
VACUUM CUP RUBBER COMPANY 
TIRES 512-514 Mission Street 




HAVE YOU SEEN IT? 

THE NEW 

MICHELIN QUICK-DETACHABLE-CLINCHER TIRE 

It's as good as the Michelin Red Inner Tube 



San Francisco 



MICHELIN TIRE COMPANY 

Los Angeles 



Seattle 




July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



By W. H. Kent 



35 



An Interesting Talk on Copper — No. IV, 



President Harris, of the Iowa Bankers' Association, estimates 
that the people of the United States are swindled out of $300,- 
000,000 every year through the sale of "fake and wildcat securi- 
ties, crooked from their inception." 

One of my correspondents was kind enough to send me the 
above statement, and I am very glad to learn from the clipping 
sent me that only a very small percentage of them are mining 
schemes. 

When I wrote last week that $150,000,000 had been lost to 
investors in the Nevada boom through wildcat mining com- 
panies, I had no idea that the public is still being swindled out 
of double that amount every year in other fake concerns. 

Thank goodness! Legitimate mining propositions will now 
have a chance to come to the front. 

The investor in mining necessarily takes a chance, but good 
heavens! he ought not to be robbed of the possible benefit of 
that chance when he furnishes the "wherewith" to provide that 
chance. 

Copper mining, however, is not so much of a chance, after all, 
and it is indeed gratifying that the old time belief that copper 
mining is a chance, is fast being superseded by a knowledge 
that when conducted on strictly business principles, looking 
into all the details, avoiding superfluous expense, using good 
judgment, copper mining is not only a business, but an extra- 
ordinarily good paying business. 

This is just how the development of the Kennett Consoli- 
dated Copper Companies has been conducted in the past, and 
exactly how it will be done in the future. 

Remember, though, that there are copper properties and cop- 
per properties. Never invest in a copper property in which 
the promoters talk about a so-many foot vein of copper ore run- 
ning all the way from ten to forty per cent copper. 

Don't be tempted to invest in a vein copper proposition at all. 
It costs too much to work them profitably, and besides, ninety- 
nine out of every hundred have to shut down unless the price of 
copper is abnormally high. 

When you do invest, see that your copper property is a low- 
grade porphyry copper proposition in which the deposits of ore 
run into the millions of tons. Then you have a chance to make 
something. 

There are hundreds of copper mines in California, but with 
one or two exceptions they are all small vein properties, outside 
of those properties in the Shasta County copper belt. The sta- 
tistics I gave you in my last "Talk" tell the tale. Shasta 
County furnishes seven-eighths of all the copper produced in 
California. 

I have quoted Stevens, the world's greatest statistical author- 
ity on copper, before, and I will quote him once again to cor- 
roborate the statement I made above relative to the "por- 
phyry coppers." He says: 

"The production of the porphyry mines is absolutely essential 
in supplying the copper needed by the world, at anything like 
a fair figure to the consumer." 

At this point it will be interesting to note what is said of 
Shasta County relative to the size of its ore bodies. In the 
"Copper Resources of California," published by the California 
State Mining Bureau, on page 52, we read: 

"The copper ore deposits in Shasta County are composed 
mainly of sulphides occurring in eruptive formations. West 
of the Sacramento the deposits are in the form of irregular 
lenses. They have been shown in some cases to be several 
hundred feet in length and breadth, with thicknesses of 50 to 
300 feet, displaying contents exceeding a million tons." 

Yes, the "Mammoth" mine, which adjoins the Kennett Con- 
solidated properties, has already taken out from one deposit, in 

Address all co 



six years, exceeding two million tons of ore, and I believe its 
reserves, which up to date have been kept intact, exceed three 
million tons more. 

Now do some more figuring. What will the Kennett Consoli- 
dated stock be worth when we have developed such an ore body 
as the "Mammoth" has? With its small capitalization of only 
$3,750,000, and not one-half of its total shares issued, the 
chances are enormously good for its making money for its 
stockholders. 

Briefly summarized, the advantages of the Kennett Con- 
solidated are: 

I. A porphyry copper — the kind that pays the biggest divi- 
dends. 

. 2. The properties cover an extensive mineralized area — nearly 
1,000 acres. 

3. Located in a copper belt ranking FIFTH IN PRODUC- 
TION in the United States. 

4. Adjacent to the greatest producing mine in California, a 
regular dividend payer. 

5. Surfaced and underground similarity to the other big mines 
of the district. 

6. Formation indicative of extensive ore bodies. 

7. Worked by tunnels, reducing working costs to a minimum. 
No expensive hoisting and pumping. 

8. Timber and water abundant. 

9. Smelters, power and railroads close at hand. 

10. Small capitalization for a big porphyry copper. 

II. First issues of stock at a very low price. 

12. Celebrated Engineer's report says : "The formation is 
identical with that of the MAMMOTH property, which it ad- 
joins, and when I first examined the MAMMOTH property in 
1896 there was no better showing at that time than there is now 
on the Big Back Bone property." 

This is the first great porphyry copper stock ever offered in 
the United States on such a small capitalization. 

For six years the properties have been developed by the 
owners on a business basis, and with their own capital. They 
will continue to be so managed for the profit of all. 

They have now reached the stage where large capital is abso- 
lutely necessary to continue operations on a large scale and 
provide diamond drills, machinery, etc. 

It is assumed that the proceeds of this first issue will furnish 
all the capital required, and make of the properties another 
"Mammoth" mine. At the present market price of copper (17V2 
cents per pound) the "Mammoth" is yielding an annual profit 
of two million dollars. 

Just think of a profit of $2,000,000 on such a small capitaliza- 
tion as ours. 

Such are the possibilities of these properties. Copper will be 
a scarce metal in a few years. 

Horace J. Stevens, the world's greatest authority on copper, 
predicts that in from two to four years there will be the greatest 
boom in copper that the world has ever seen. 

No promoters are handling this stock. Usually such a copper 
stock would cost at least $5.00 a share if promoters were hand- 
ling it. 

And mark this innovation: We do not intend to maintain ele- 
gant and expensive offices, pay extravagant commissions to 
agents or pay big men for the use of their names on our Board 
of Directors. These are the causes of failure of more than half 
of the corporations that go to the wall. 

We will send you free a booklet called "Porphyry Coppers," 
which more fully describes these properties, if you will send us 
your name and address. Don't wait a week or a month before 
you write for it, because only a few people can be accommo- 
dated with shares, as some large blocks are already spoken for. 

mmunications to 



Kennett Consolidated Copper Companies 

924 PAGE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




OTELVAND^ 5UMB DBOffi 






; 




ytIS 


SP 


|^;g!B|^jgPJSpy»" 






X r L.iJ I 



Highland Springs 

RATES— Tents, §12 per week; cottage, $14 to $16; main hotel, $14, 
$16, $17.50. FARE— San Francisco to Highland Springs, train and 
stage, $8 round trip; train and auto. $11 round trip. Special trans- 
portation rates to guests as follows: 1 week's stay at Highland 
Springs, San Francisco to Highland Springs and return by stage. 
$7; by auto, $9.50. 2 weeks' stay, San Francisco to HIghlandSprings 
and return, by stage. $6.50; by auto, $$.50. Those wishing these 
rates, inquire of Peck-Judah, 6S7 Market street, or address 

W. H. MARSHALL, Prop., Highland Springs. 
Grand Fourth of July Celebration: amusements in the day, fire- 
works at night. 



HARBIN SPRINGS 

• NEAREST LAKE COUNTY RESORT TO SAN FRANCISCO 
A delightful run over good roads through a beautiful country. 
Automobile supplies kept; facilities for ordinary repairs; wash rack. 
Hot and Cold Tub Baths, Showers, Natural Hot Mineral Wate 
Plunge, Swimming Tank, Etc. 

EXCELLENT TABLE. 



Emerald Bay Camp 

Beautifully situated, moderately equipped tents and cottages; 
boating, fishing, bathing, tramping. New management. Nelson L. 
Salter, Prop. Lee S. Seward, Manager. Address Manager, Emer- 
ald Bay P. O., Lake Tahoe, Cal., or Peck-Judah Co., 687 Market St, 
San Francisco. 



HOWARD SPRINGS 

Lake County's Famous 42 Mineral Springs 

(Under new management) 

Lithia for kidneys: hot iron bath, HO degrees, for rheum- 
atism. The waters of the Hot Magnesia Springs have a wonder- 
ful record in the cure of stomach trouble; S12toS18 oer week. 

R. J. YATES, Prop., Howard Springs, Lake County, Cal. 



MOUNTAIN HOME 

In the Santa Cruz Mountains. No better place In Central California 
for hunting, fishing or swimming. Table unsurpassed; delightful 
climate; stage at Morgan Hill Monday, Wednesday and Saturday 
Excellent roads for automobiles. Train leaves San Francisco at 
7 a. m. Phone Farmers 61, Madrone. Send for souvenir of Mrs 
Vic. Poncelet, Llagas, Cal. 



CARR'S 
NEW MONTE RIO HOTEL 

Nearest to Station and River 

New modern hotel, first class in every detail and equipped with every modern 
convenience. Swimming, boating, canoeing, f.shing. launching, horseback 
riding and driving. Address C. F. CARR. Monte Rio, Sonoma Co Cal 



CASA DEL REY 



SANTA CRUZ 



CAL. 



New 300-room, fireproof hotel 
located near the beach and the 
Casino, open all the year round 

AMERICAN PLAN 

Tennis Courts, Good boating, 
bathing and fishing; numerous 
drives along the Coast and 
through the mountains. 

SUPERIOR GOLFING 

SANTA CRUZ BEACH HOTEL COMPANY 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Now Open 

Hot Steam Baths Cold Sulphur and Sour Springs 

Address — 

MISS ROSE ANDERSON 

Anderson Springs, Middletown Lake County, Cal. 



FETTERS HOT SPRINGS 

Modern, Convenient, Comfortable. Open all Year 'Round. 
Natural hot mineral springs, bath-house 50 feet from hotel and 
cottages; electric lights, new garage; hot and cold mineral water in 
every room; hunting, fishing, swimming, orchard, vineyard and 
dairy; two blocks from station; auto and 'bus meet all trains. Buy 
ticket to Agua Callente, via N. W. P. or S. P. Address GEO. FET- 
TERS, Fetters Hot Springs, Sonoma County, Cal. 



Brookdale Hotel 

In the heart of the Santa Cruz Mountains, only 2^6 hours from 
S. F. White sulphur water springs mi hotel grounds. No wind; 
no fog. Climate ideal. TROUT FISHING, the best in 10 years. For 
Information and booklet, write MRS. M. FAIRLEE, Prop., Brook- 
dale, or Peck-Judah's. 



C. J. Boehm, Proprietor. Ben Lomond, Santa Cruz County, Cal. 
18 Trains Dally. 

HOTEL BEN LOMOND 

AND COTTAGES 
C. J. BOEHM, Proprietor 

Rates $2.50 per day. Most beautiful home in the Santa Cruz 
Mountains. Private baths. All modern conveniences. First-class 
tennis and croquet courts. Billiards, Bowling Alley, Boating, Bath- 
ing and Fishing. 



Campers to Yosemite Valley 

Can be supplied with tents, complete camping outfits and all kinds 
of provisions at the Yosemite Valley store. Parties outfitted for 
High Sierra trips and flshiny excursions. Rates reasonable. NEL- 
SON L. SALTER, Proprietor. 



GILROY HOT SPRINGS 

Santa Clara County. 

Only four hours from San Francisco. Round trip rate, including 
stage, $5.70. Fine road for automobiles. Full Information and 
folders at Peck-Judah Co., 687 Market St., S. F., or 

w. j. Mcdonald, Prop. 




myAND* since 




BEAUTIFUL 



Paraiso Hot Springs 



Now'a the Time to Visit California's Real Paradise 

Weather and roads are unsurpassed. Wonderful natural hot soda 
and sulphur; guaranteed for rheumatism, liver, kidney and all 
stomach troubles. Expert masseurs. Rates $12 to $16, including 
baths. Round trip $G,35. including auto. Mecca for north and 
south bound autos. Logical one-day run. Free workshop and gar- 
age, accessories. Leave Third and Townsend, 9:00 a. m. First and 
Broadway, Oakland 8:00 a. m. Or will meet 4 p. m. train if notified. 
Booklets Peck-Judah or Bryans*. 

H. H. McGOWAN, Prop, and Mgr. 

Paraiso Springs Monterey County 



YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK 

The Outing-Place of California 

SNOW-CAPPED MOUNTAINS MIRROR LAKES AND HAPPY ISLES 

THUNDERING WATERFALLS MASSIVE WALLS AND DOMES 

A Galaxy Unsurpassed 

A Smooth. Dustless, Well Sprinkle d Road Into (he Valley 

A Special Feature of This Season's Trip 

The waterfalls are booming full. Condi- 
tions in the Valley were never better than 
this season. Surrounding mountain peaks and 
watersheds are covered with late snows, 
which insures a lasting flow of water. 

Why visit the commonplace resorts, when 
tlir sublime and the beautiful beckon you. 
Cost of this trip is now reduced to popular 
prices. Four excellent camps offer the visitor 
the most pleasing entertainment: 
CAMP CURRY, CAMP AHWAHNEE, CAMP 
LOST ARROW. SENTINEL HOTEL, 
i^ach is charmingly and picturesquely situ- 
ated on the floor of the Valley, surrounded 
by the masterpieces of Nature. 

Tt is now ;i quick, comfortable trip into the 
Valley. For full information or descriptive 
folder, addri ss your camp or hotel in Yosem- 
ite, any ticket office or information bureau in 
t California, or 




YOSEMITE VALLEY RAILROAD COMPANY, 



Merced, Cal. 



Hotel Westminster 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. Fourth and Main Sta. 

American Plan Reopened. 

Rates per day, $2.50, rooms without bath 
Rooms with bath, $3, $3. SO and $4. 

European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up. 
•With bath $1.50 and up. 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



TENTS AND HAMMOCKS 

Camp Furniture Canoes and Flags 

6x10 Ft. Cotton Bunting Flags $2.00 Each 

WEEKS-HOWE EMERSON COMPANY 



51 Market Street 



San Francisco 



White Diamond Water Co. "" w "*' hr £^ 

Incorporated BcrkaotT 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 
treated, but bacterlologlcally purified by electrical process. 6 gallons 
DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. $1.60 per month. Single 6 gallon 
bottle. 40 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 86792, 
6736 Talegraph Ave, opposite Idora Park. Oakland. Cal- 

Henley — How are you getting on with your writing for 

the magazines? Penley — Just holding my own. They send me 
back as much as I send them. — Boston Transcript. 



Tallac and Brockway 

LAKE TAHOE 

The scenic resorts that have made Lake Tahoe 
famous. Open June 1st, under same management as in 
past years. Fishing season opens June 1st. 

Autos From Placerville Daily 

The Automobile Trip over the Placerville State Road 
is the most picturesque in America. Two 7-passenger 
Pierce-Arrow automobiles run daily, one leaving Placer- 
ville at 7 a. m. daily; one leaving Tallac at 7 a. m. daily; 
arriving at destinations at noon. 



Tallac. Cal. 



LAWRENCE & COMSTOCK 

Brockway. Cal. 




Open all the year. New 
ownership. New man- 
agement. New features. 
Forty rooms with private 
baths. 



Golf Tennis Bowling Fishing 

Boating Swimming Club House 

Free Garage 

Everything Possible for Your Comfort and Pleasure 
Rates $17.50 to $25.00 per week, $3.00 to $4.00 per day 

Booklets and other particulars at PECK-JUDAH CO.. or write 
J. M.SHOULTS BEN LOMOND. CAL. 



Lake County 
Automobile Transportation Co. 

; .i by automobile and stages from Pleta to High- 
land Springs, Lakeport, Kelseyville and Upper Lake Fine moun- 
i.iii, scenerj over this line. (Special all-rail and auto round-trip 
San Francisco to Bar tie tl Springs and return, only $18. in- 
beautlful Clear Lake.) Also Soda Bay and re- 
Luding boat on lake. Extra auto charge li 
Uon to ""i Springs, $1.50; to Lakeport 

$1.50. rickets "ii sale at Northwestern Pacific Railroad Company, 
and v Ti Market street, San Francisco. 



RIONIDO HOTEL 

AND TENTS 
The ideal resort of the Russian river. Now open. 
Make your reservations now. Rates $12 per week. 
Address Rionido Co., Rionido, Cal. 



MARK WEST SPRINGS 

Trains leave S. F. twice daily to Fulton, where stages connect. 
Round trip ti. "5, including stage. Excellent table; hot mineral baths. 
All kinds of sports. Address MRS. M. MULGREW, Fulton, Cal. 
Particulars, Peck-Judah, 687 Market St. 



SUMMER RESORTS 

AT HOME. AT THE CLUB. CAFE OR HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 



Always Satisfactory 
GEO. W. CASWELL COMPANY 

ijo-533-5** Folsom Street Phone Kearny 3610 

iVrite for samples and prices 



Mention the News Letter 



THE GABLES 

The hotel that is different. Everything new. Nearest hot mineral 
springs to City . Paying guests received. Address 

H. P. MATHKWSON, Sonoma, Cal. 
Buy tickets to Ver»no. N. W. P Rallvaj 



38 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 




Pacific Mutual Life 
Ins. Co. of California 

Insure Against 
LOSS OF INCOME 

EARNING POWER 

or SALARY 




r/G^^i-^-^L 



SHREVE BUILDING 



Manager Accident Department 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital $1,500,000 



Assets $8,650,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 
8an Francisco, California. 



Capital. 1400. 000 Assets. Over a Million 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 
(Best In the West.) 

Employe™' Liability, General Liability. Teams, Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass Accident and Health 
Insurance. Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; Marshal A. Frank, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Joy Llchtensteln. Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co.. Treasurer: F. P. 
Deerlng, Counsel. L. B. Hoge, General Manager Accident and Health De- 
partment. 

Head Office — Merchants* Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 416 Montgomery St.. 
San Francisco. 

The Weft Coaft Life Insurance Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid lneur&nce 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

Geo. E. Billings R07 C. Ward Junes K Polk J. C. Meussdorffer James W. Deas 



GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED 



312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Douglas 22*3 
Home Phon. C 1191 



The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established I860. 

Sixty-Second Annual Statement. 

Capital $1,000,000 

Surplus to Policyholders 3 117 286 

Total Assets 7,BI7l091 

Pacific Department: 

Alaska Commercial Building ..... gan Francisco 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 





REMEMBER!!! 






We write 






Liability insurance, in all its branches, Automobile 
Burglary, Elevator, and Health and Accident Insurance. 
PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY 
San Francisco. Cal. C. H. CRAWFORD. 


Plate 

Presid 


Glass, 

nl 




1INSVMCB 




LUi 



A recent court decision in Seattle has led to property owners 
and insurance companies suing the Great Northern Railroad 
for the amount ol losses in a recent wharf and warehouse fire at 
that place. It is claimed that sparks or ashes from an engine 
of the defendant company was the direct cause of the fire. A 
recent edition of Insurance Engineering calling attention to the 
loss from fire caused by locomotives has the following: "The 
United States District Forester for Montana and Idaho esti- 
mated a loss to the Government and adjoining timber of 6,000,- 
000.000 feet, or a total of $21,500,000, caused by 1,670 fires, 56 
per cent of which started on the railroad rights of way and in 
spite of good co-operation by the railroads. The great forest 
fires in Minnesota during 1910, which caused such loss of life 
and suffering in the towns of Spooner and Beaudette, with 
$1,000,000 worth of valuable property and timber, were due to 
four fires, three of which were started by locomotive sparks. 
Four fire insurance companies which make a specialty of in- 
suring flour mills and elevators paid more than $160,000 in 
1910 for losses due to this cause. The Cotton Insurance Asso- 
ciation of Georgia has reported that 90 per cent of cotton fires 
in transportation are due to locomotive sparks. A grain dealers' 
mutual fire insurance company reports each year from 17 to 28 
per cent of its losses due to the same cause. The fire records 
of manufacturing risks which have been published in the quar- 
terlies of the National Fire Protection Association show a very 
material percentage of fires from locomotive sparks, and yet 
taken as a whole we would not consider manufacturing risks as 
particularly susceptible to the spark hazard. The record of 
fires in fifteen classes of manufacturing risks showed about 3 
per cent to be due to this cause." 

* * * 

The Washington Industrial Insurance Commission has issued 
a statement of the work accomplished under the so-called State 
insurance law during the first eight months of its operations, or 
from October 1, 1911, to June 1, 1912. According to the com- 
mission, the employers listed and assessed during that period 
number 5,200, while their employees total 125,000. Accidents 
reported during the eight months aggregated 6,985. Of these, 
4,525 claims were allowed, 1,319 are still in course of adjust- 
ment, and 1,141 were declared void. 

On June 1st, $640,951.30 had been paid into the State fund by 
employers. Payments on account of claims amounted to $216,- 
535.21, and $149,796.70 had been placed in reserve to meet 
monthly payments under pensions awarded beneficiaries of 
killed workmen. The balance in the fund on June 1st was $274,- 
719.39. The expenses of the commission during the eight 
months amounted to $78,752.92, all of which are defrayed from 
a special appropriation made by the State. The expenses of the 
commission are approximately 12 per cent of the amount con- 
tributed by the employers. 

* * * 

The Fire Marshal of New York City has recently arrested 
an East Side youth named Isador Steinrutzer. He is charged 
with being the head of a fire-bug syndicate, and of having 
started more than three hundred fires in New York City in the 
last five years. The evidence in the case shows that the syndi- 
cate is composed of a number of underworld characters, in- 
cluding some insurance brokers and adjusters. According to 
the same account, it is stated that 25 per cent of the fires in 
New York City are of incendiary origin, and that the average 

price charged for starting a fire is $25. 

* * * 

The bandit who held up and robbed the Nevada County 
Bank at Grass Valley, Cal., on May 16th, escaping with over 
$5,000 of the bank's funds, was captured at Grass Valley last 
week after an unsuccessful attempt to hold up a saloon, in 
which he killed one man and wounded two others. The next 
morning he was found dead in the county jail, having hanged 
himself during the night. The American Bonding paid the 
Nevada County Bank $5,280 under a bank burglary policy as a 
result of the holdup of May 16th. 



July 6, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



39 



The North British and Mercantile Insurance Company an- 
nounces that the statement that it is again taking active steps 
to bring over the Railway Passengers' Assurance Company for 
casualty lines is without foundation. The situation as regards 
the possibility of the Railway Passengers' being entered for 
casualty lines in this country remains exactly as it has been for 
the past year or so. 

* * * 

The chances are that a "Blue Sky" law, similar to that so 
successfully in vogue in Kansas for the protection of citizens 
against stock swindlers of bogus securities, will come up for 
consideration in the next meeting of the State Legislature in 
1913. Arizona adopted the idea May 1st, and the Idaho 
Bankers' Association has asked that the law be introduced into 
that State. The Portland Chamber of Commerce is pressing 
the same movement in Oregon. 

* * * 

Marco E. Hellman, who succeeded to his late father's busi- 
ness, announces that all persons in his father's employ for ten 
years will become members of an insurance pension system, to 
be handled by the executor of the estate. The policies will 
average approximately $2,000, payable to the widow and 
family. 

* .1: * 

Fire Marshal Towe and Fire Chief Murphy are drafting a 
new fire ordinance providing for the better protection of the 
employees in the factory districts of the city. Owners and 
managers will be compelled to build proper exits to meet 

emergencies, and other improvements will be suggested. 

* * * 

John E. Hendry, a well known insurance man of Chicago, has 
been appointed general agent of the new Vulcan Fire of Oak- 
land. Hendry will cover the Northern California field. The 
Vulcan Fire has just been admitted to membership in the 
Board of Fire Underwriters of the Pacific. 

San Francisco is one of the few cities that stands vigorously 
for a sane Fourth of July celebration. The use of fire crackers 
within the city limits is prohibited by ordinance with proper 
penalties. The fire record on that day has been reduced to a 
minimum since the ordinance was adopted. 

Milton E. Pinney has been appointed special agent to rep- 
resent the general agency of the Associated Underwriters, Inc., 
in the Northwest field. Pinney has had a wide experience in 
the Northwest. His headquarters will be in Spokane. 

The Ohio Supreme Court has just ruled that a policy taken 
out by a corporation on the life of one of its officers, and made 
payable to the corporation, is valid, even though he sever his 
connection with the company. 

Salt Lake has just launched a new insurance agency, the 
Utah Underwriters, capital $25,000. H. F. Savage, formerly 
president of the Agency Company, is president of the new 
enterprise. 

The second convention of the International Association of 
Casualty and Surety Underwriters will be held at the Hotel 
Chamberlain, Old Point Comfort, Virginia, next August 13th 
to 16th. 

Harry L. Roff has been appointed general agent here of the 
Century Fire. Application to the State Insurance Commis- 
sioner will be made at an early date. 

George I. Cochran, President of the Pacific Mutual Life of 
Los Angeles, is now in England, preparing for a continental 
motor tour. Mrs. Cochran is with him. 

Hartford Steam Boiler has been awarded the insurance of all 
the boilers in the Salt Lake City public schools; terms, 3 years, 
at a $30 rate on each boiler. 

W. L. Wallace will have temporary charge of the San Fran- 
cisco department of the Los Angeles Fire, owing to Mr. Med- 
craft's resignation as manager. 

Will Maris, who has been doing business as an independent 
adjuster, is preparing to go into business as an adjuster for 
the insured. 

C. W. Greene, a well known broker of Chicago, is here as 
general agent of the Occidental Fire of Alburquerque. of New- 
Mexico. 

A. F. Griffin has been appointed special agent of the New 
Jersey Fire for Central California. 

A. H. Miller has secured the agency of the Standard of 
Hartford for Oakland. 

Spokane has introduced a system of wooden water mains. 



Since the decision rendered by the United States Supreme 
Court, it has been decided by the Monks hereafter to bottle 

CHARTREUSE 



(Liqueur Peres Chartreux) 

both being identically the same article, under a combi- 
nation label representing the old and the new labels, and 
In the old style of bottle bearing the Monks' familiar 
insignia, as shown in this advertisement. 

According to the decision of the U. S. Supreme 
Court, handed down by Mr. Justice Hughes on May 
29th, 1911, no one but the Carthusian Monks (Peres 
Chartreux) is entitled to use the word CHARTREUSE 
as the name or designation of a Liqueur, so their victory 
in the suit against the Cusenier Company, representing 
M. Henri Lecouturier, the Liquidator appointed by the 
French Courts, and his successors, the Compagnie 
Fermiere de la Grande Chartreuse, is complete. 

The Carthusian Monks (Peres Chartreux), and they 
alone, have the formula or recipe of the secret process 
employed in the manufacture of the genuine Chartreuse, 
and have never parted with it. There is no genuine 
Chartreuse save that made by them atTarragona.Spain. 



At first-class Wine Merchants, Grocers, Hotels, Cafes, 

Batler & Co., 45 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 



Continuous Eye Rest 
and Eye Comfort 

Mr. Geo. Mayerle. San Francisco. 

Dear Sir — I wore the glasses you made for me 12 years continu- 
ously, which I consider something wonderful, and can heartily rec- 
ommend you to any one in need of glasses. Also the new pair you 
Just made suit me flnp. Yours truly, 

M. A. MORGAN, 
417 South Gates St.. Los Angeles, Cal. January 16, 1912. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Optician. 
Charter Member American Association of Opticians. 
960 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 
Mayerle's Eyewater, the Great Eye Tonic, freshens and 
strengthens the eye. Sent by mail on receipt of 65c. 

Mayerle's Antiseptic Eyeglass Wipers (a chemical cloth), 3 for 25c. 







Ask your 
Dealer for 

Goodyear 

"Hippo" 

Hose 

GOODYEARtTRUBBER COMPANY 
R. H. PEASE, Presides* 589. S91. 593 Mirket St. 



TRY IT AND 

BE CONVINCED 

San Frsncisco 



YOU KNOW 



SAPOLIO 

Will Do It 

CLEANS, SCOURS, POLISHES 

Works Without Waste 



40 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 6, 1912. 



BANKING 



Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The Safe Deposit Vault 




This vault is the same 
that successfully with- 
stood the supreme test 
of the conflagration of 
1906, and the newly 
installed boxes are the 
latest and best in safe 
deposit construction. 

BOXES $4.00 per year 
and upward 



NORTHEAST CORNER MARKET AND MONTGOMERY STREETS 



ANGLO & LONDON 

PARIS NATIONAL 

BANK 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Patd-Up Capital 94.000,000 

Surplus and UndlTided Profile $1,000,000 
Total Resources 140.000,000 

OFFICERS; 

HERBERT FLEISHHACKER President 

SIO. OREENEBAtJM Chairman of the Board 




JOS. FR1EDLA1SDER 


Vice-President 


C. F. HURT 


Vice- President 


R ALTSCHUL 


Cashier 


C. R. PARKER 


Assistant Cashier 


WM. H. HI0H 


Assistant Cashier 


H. CHOYNSKI 


Assistant Cashier 


Q. R. BTJRDICK 


Assistant Cashier 


A. L. LANGERMAW 


Secretary 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO 



SIR EDMUND WALKER C. V. 0.. LL. D.. D. C. L. 
President 



ALEXANDER LAIRD 



General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 

Paid-up Capital, $15,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 12,500,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently Issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way In which to carry money when traveling. They are is- 
sued in denominations of 

(10, $20, $50, $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable In Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated on the face of each cheque, while In other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all Information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

450 California Street, corner Leldesdorff. 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

(The German Bank) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The following Branches for Receipt and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission St., Between 21st and 22nd 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 Clement St., cor. 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 Haight St., Near Masonic Ave. 

June 29th, 1912 

Assets $51,140,101.75 

Capital actually paid up in Cash - - 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - - 1,656,403.80 

Employees' Pension Fund - 140,109.60 

Number of Depositors * 56,609 



Office Hours : 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m„ except Saturdays 
to 12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 
o'clock p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 



GREAT WATER CARNIVAL AT SANTA CRUZ. 

A fairy lake, viewed from the decks of a huge phantom ship, 
erected on a grass-grown island in San Lorenzo River — this is 
to be the scene of the great water pageant and carnival at Santa 
Cruz, starting on July 20th and lasting an entire week. Hun- 
dreds of workmen, under the direct personal management of 
Mr. Fred Swanton, are gradually transforming the sandy flats 
just south of Hotel Casa del Rey into a veritable fairyland, soon 
to be peopled with strange and wonderful gnomes, genii and 
pixies, and guarded by a fleet of mystic water craft, each vessel 
of which will remind you of Shakespeare's "Midsummer 
Night's Dream." 

It is a bold idea of Manager Swanton's, and one that will 
not soon be forgotten by those who are fortunate enough to 
witness the festival. It contemplates the damning of the San 
Lorenzo River, a stone's throw from where it joins the mighty 
Pacific, in order to create a charming lake ; the decoration of the 
southern banks of that river until it shall resemble Arcady; the 
construction, on an island, of a huge amphitheatre in the shape 
of a Spanish galleon, capable of seating four thousand persons; 
and then a nightly parade of gorgeous floats and boats, filled 
with singing and dancing girls, robust steersmen and soldiers 
and happy children. Rome, in its days of splendor, never con- 
ceived anything more entrancing. 

And then, to be sure, there will be the hundred daylight diver- 
sions for the visitor — the yacht, motorboat, shell, swimming and 
hydroplane races; the airships encircling the lofty blue; the 
bathing, fishing, dancing, riding and skylarking on the mile-long 
board walk. More than fifty great white birds, belonging to the 
Corinthians and other yachtsmen, will be in the harbor; an 
equal number of motor boats; a pair of Uncle Sam's cruisers, 
and two of his submarines ; an even dozen of the world's famous 
swimmers, under the direction of Sidney Cavill; and to crown 
it all, thousands of dollars' worth of fireworks, which will illu- 
minate the sky at the close of each evening's entertainment. 

In the preparation of his program, Manager Swanton has 
been aided materially by Commodore Conney, of the Corin- 
thians, and ex-Commodore Hogg, each of whom has taken a 
keen interest in the carnival. The railroad company is offering 
exceptionally low fares for the week, and the hotels and cot- 
tage cities of Santa Cruz have pledged themselves to make no 
advance over their regular rates. Altogether, "water week" at 
Santa Cruz should be the biggest thing ever attempted on the 
Pacific Coast, and Manager Swanton is to be congratulated upon 
evolving such a meritorious entertainment. 



All American women in Europe have been given the op- 
portunity to contribute to the Woman's "Titanic" Memorial, 
the organization formed in Washington by Mrs. John Hay, 
widow of the late Secretary of State, and Mrs. John Hays Ham- 
mond, wife of the noted mining engineer, for the purpose of 
erecting in the American capital a majestic arch to commemo- 
rate the bravery of all the men who died on the Titanic to save 
the women and children. In order to carry out on business lines 
the collection of this money in Europe, an international com- 
mittee has been formed, consisting of all the ambassadors, 
ministers and consuls of the United States stationed throughout 
Europe. The central offices in Washington have already re- 
ceived liberal contributions from many women in Europe, and 
the diplomats who were invited to serve on the international 
committee have taken charge of the work with enthusiasm. 

It will be of interest to all Europeans to know that the idea 
originated with Mrs. John Hays Hammond, the wife of the man 
who served as special Envoy from the United States to the 
Coronation of the King and Queen of England, and who also re- 
cently toured Europe on the commission to interest the govern- 
ments of Great Britain and the Continent in taking part in the 
San Francisco Exposition to celebrate the opening of the 
Panama Canal. 



Wedding Presents.—- The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Dr. Axnew, 

Franctao*. 



ractal dlae&ses exclusively. 424 Pacific Building-, Ban 



^ r 





"They go in like a needle 

and 
Hold like an Anchor " 



This advertising phrase is catching the 

eye of men -who know and making them 

ask for 

Krementz Bodkin-Clutch 



Stud and Vest Buttons 

with Cuff Links to match 

The most perfect studs for evening dress and stiff 
bosom shirts ever put on the market. 

Absolutely bother free. 

No hollow tubes; no hinges; no loose parts; no 
spiral springs; no soldered joints. 

They combine simplicity with strength; beauty of 
design with perfection of finish. 






G © 



•••• 

This is only one of the few designs made in 
14K gold, platinum and enamel mounting, with or 
without precious stones. 



Krementz & Co, 



Sold by all the Leading Jewelers only 



SANTA CRUZ 



"The Atlantic City of the Pacific Coast" 
IS PLANNING A 

Wonderful Water 
Pageant 

For the following dates: 

July 20th to July 28th, Inclusive 

Yacht Regattas Motor Boat Races 

Review of American Battleships 
Parade of Decorated Water Floats 
Swimming and Rowing Contests 

Surf-Bathing, Dancing, Golf, Tennis, Fire-Works 

Don't Miss The Fun 

Regular rates at new Hotel Casa del Rey 

Special low ticket fares 
ASK OUR AGENTS 

Southern Pacific 

Flood Building Palace Hotel 

Third and Townsend Street Station 

Market Street Ferry Station 

San Francisco 

Broadway and Thirteenth Street 
Oakland 














^^^ The 

Egyptian 
Cigarette 
of Quality 

AROMATIC DELICACY 

MILDNESS 

PURITY 

At your Club or Dealer's 
THE SURBRUQ CO., Makers, New York. 











-fflKT^C 




Peach Short Cake 

A well made Peach Short Cake is a de- 
lightful dessert. Where perfectly ripe and 
mellow, fresh peaches cannot be had, the 
canned fruit is about as good. To get a 
rich, crisp, and fine-flavored crust, use 

BORDEN'S EAGLE BRAND 
CONDENSED MILK 

RECIPE — Mix and sift two cups flour, one teaspoon 
baking powder, and a pinch o( sail ; rub into it one h: aping 
tablespoon butler and mix lightly with (our tablespoons 
Borden's Condensed Milk diluted with three-fouiihs cup 
water. This will-make a soft dough, whiih spread on a 
buttered pie tin. Bake twenty min- 
utes in a quick oven. Split, and fill 
wilh sliced peaches that have been 
sweetened to the taste, and cover 
wilh whipped fresh cream. 

Write for 
\ Borden 's Recipe Book 

BORDEN'S 
. ; CONDENSED MILK CO. 

"Leaders of Quality ' ' 
Est. 1857 New York 




al 



BOYES HOT SPRINGS 

IN THE BEAUTIFUL SONOMA VALLEY 

An Ideal Spot for Health and Pleasure Seekers 
OPEN THE YEAR ROUND 




The Largest Mineral Water Swimming Tank in the World — 75x150 Ft., and Modern Porcelain Hot Tub Baths. 



Modern Hotel. 

New Annex Just Completed. 

Handsome Club House. 

Attractive and well-furnished Cottages. 

Commodious Tents. 



Electric Lights, and 

Running Water Throughout. 

Rendezvous for Automobiles. 

New Theatre. 

Baseball and Handball Grounds. 



Perfect Climate. 

Grill SeparaLe from Hotel. 

Dining Room Supplied with 

Best the Market Affords. 

Local and Long-Distance Phone. 



BOYES HOT SPRINGS 

Located 45 miles or a little more than an hour and a half's ride from San Francisco, on the Sonoma Branch of the Northwestern 
Pacific Railroad. Two trains each way daily. Three trains Sundays. Depot on the grounds. 

DR. E. L. PARRAMORE. 
Send for Illustrated Pamphlet. R. G. LICHTENBERG. 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. lxxxtv 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 13, 1912 



No. 2 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco. Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway. C. C. Murphy, and 156 Fifth 
avenue, S. L. Carman, representatives. 

Chicago Office — H. L. Selden, 122 South Michigan Boulevard. 

Boston Office — Charles S. Parr. 525 Tremont Temple. 

London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements, or other matter intended for publication In 
the current number of the SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 
CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, should be sent to the office not later than 
5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (Including postage)— 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, $2.26. 
Foreign — 1 year, $6.00; 6 months, $3.25. 



Seven little Governors shouting for T. R. Then the Chi- 
cago fizzle, and only three there are. 

The Colonel would oblige a long-suffering people by 

tying that bull moose somewhere outside. 

Brittannia may rule the waves, but she is not among the 

"also rans" on the international field of sports. 

Volcano and earthquake make Alaska seem and sound 

like a feeble imitation of the Chicago convention. 

The lady chauffeur guides a "steam roller" as compe- 
tently as she does any other modern bit of machinery. 

Colonel Theodore's third party convention call is out, 

but it is a feeble cry as of an infant that was born nearly dead. 

At 73 John D. Rockefeller says he "never felt better." 

Obviously he is not worrying about that needle's eye stuff in the 
Bible. 

Query: Who is acting as Ruef's amanuensis and steno- 
grapher while he sets down the wickedness of everybody but 
Ruef? 

"Dee-lighted!" used to be his favorite exclamation. Since 

the Chicago fiasco he might with propriety make it "Dee- 
feated!" 

"The third party, c'est moi," the Colonel might fittingly 

remark at this juncture when he himself is, in truth, about all 
there is of it. 

It would not be bad national business to add to our navy 

the Long Island Sound steamer that ran down and crippled one 
of our best battleships. 

The difference between the new sane and the old insane 

Fourth is enough to make the property owner and the insurance 
man immensely happy. 

America for speed, strength and skill in athletics of all 

kinds as against all the world — that is the net result of the 
Olympiad at Stockholm. 

"My wife," says Harry Thaw, "has been acting badly." 

That's about what the critics said when the young woman had 
her try at the footlight game. 



The Camorra convictions afforded the world an oppor- 
tunity to compare the Latin and the Anglo-Saxon temperament 
when it comes to taking punishment. 

Grove Johnson is getting ready to run for the Assembly 

next trip with the full knowledge that son Hiram has no scru- 
ples whatever against parent-beating. 

■ Skirts and sleeves are being legislated on to the bathing 

suits of both sexes down at Venice, Cal. In that latitude not 
even crab-legs may be served undressed. 

From the evidence thus far adduced for the Congres- 
sional committee it would appear that Judge Hanford is a 
prominent member of the "Souse Famil-ee." 

Much good Abe Ruef is doing the State by his supposed 

service in the San Quentin jute mill, unless he is violating the 
eight-hour law in the production of his memoirs. 

Mayor Rolph will now join the ranks of those who re- 
gard the motorcycle, bestridden by a country constable, as one 
of the most fiendish inventions of the father of evil. 

Now why do you suppose the Prohibitionists chose for 

their national convention Atlantic City? It is neither the dryest 
nor the most moral spot on the map of the United States. 

Most of the seven voices which sounded to the Colonel 

like the voice of the American people calling him back to the 
White House are now moving to reconsider the invitation. 

A ten months old baby boy kicks so hard that he breaks 

two of his proud mother's ribs. There's a child that will grow 
up to be somebody in the cause of insurgency, or else on the 
football team. 

At Santa Rosa, a firm of undertakers contracts to bury 

the county hospital dead at one cent per head. These figures 
indicate that the demand for dissection room cadavers is strong 
and increasing. 

Judge Archbald is "bawled out" as the prize reacher and 

snatcher of the Federal judiciary. It won't hurt him to lose 
his job: he'll be on the making side wherever there is any 
money working. 

Those little "Siamese" twins from the Philippines are 

bound together as hard and fast as a Johnson reformer and the 
State payroll, with the further likeness that they have only one 
stomach between them. 

If ycu want to know why the motorist hates, fears and 

loathes the motorcyclist, take an automobile spin any day to 
one of the neighboring counties and see the mill of annoyance 
and oppression working. 

Up at Johnsonville-on-the-Sacramento a supply of black- 
jacks, slung-shots, jimmies, skeleton keys, drills, etc., is being 
prepared for the September primary and convention campaign, 
and painters are at work making banners with the progressive 
party legend, "Thou Shalt Not Steal." 




' ■' ' "' , ' ' ' " 

E/DITORIAL COMMENT 



-■■■'■■■ - 




It is not plain sailing for the "third 
Embarrassing Position term, third party" movement. The 
For a State's Governor, "bull moose" of Oyster Bay has 
sent out his summons for the gath- 
ering of the rough-riders at Chicago in August, but the fire and 
enthusiasm has died out of the support that was his during the 
convention of the party he now proposes to destroy. It does 
not look like a national campaign of consequence — not this 
year. 

There are some who refuse to believe that so adroit and 
under-scrupled politician as Roosevelt will sacrifice himself 
as the candidate of a forlorn hope, willing to go down to cer- 
tain defeat for the privilege of publicly proclaiming its faith 
and principles. The Colonel, say these observers, is not that 
kind of a fighter: he would rather be president than be right. 
Others deem the Apostle of Honesty too much the victim 
of megalomania, too besotten in egotism to quit or to defer his 
own candidacy. At Chicago last month he might have com- 
promised and won. Hadley could have been pushed over the 
line to the nomination. But Roosevelt had already said, with 
a fine disregard for common modesty and for the laws of the 
language: "If there is any compromise candidate it will be 
me." He meant it. There was no chance for a compromise on 
any other terms. And if he had set himself up then as the 
only possible savior of a people fearfully, if unconsciously, op- 
pressed, so much the more that way now. These others fore- 
see no chance that the Colonel will let any other be the third 
party standard bearer this year in order to save himself for a 
conceivable better chance to force the Republican situation four 
years hence. 

Out of the seven "little governors," whose solicitations, as far 
as the public knows, caused the desertion of La Follette and the 
declaration of Roosevelt for himself, four have announced that 
they are not and will not be in the third party camp. In truth, 
they deplore that movement and advise against it. Kansas, 
Michigan, Nebraska and Missouri must be counted out of the 
running if the race is to turn in that direction. They will make 
their fight within established party lines. 

Of the three States whose Governors remain with the Col- 
onel for his third party excursion, only California can deliver 
the goods; only California is held fast in the grip of its party- 
renouncing Governor. Johnson is prepared to try to deliver the 
goods, and to go to any length for that purpose. He and his 
lieutenants are not troubling to wear masks, as they go at the 
brutal job of robbing the Taft Republicans of the State of any 
chance to vote for Taft electors. 

Johnson is in a desperate situation. He has excellent reason 
to stand fast for the third party plan. It is the only hope he has 
for his own political salvation. Already he has alienated him- 
self from the Republican party, under whose flag he stormed 
and took the Capitol. With no third party in the field, he must 
either support Wilson or keep still and lose his grip on the Re- 
publican organization. Either way would take him to destruc- 
tion. ,His one safe exit is the third party, so used as to destroy 
the Republican party's entity in the State after using it exclu- 
sively and piratically to shut Taft electors off the ballot. 

This determination upon a cold steal of gigantic proportions, 
amounting to the disenfranchisement of every Taft supporter in 
California, has lit thus early the fires of a resentment that will 



not be put out with sophistries. More than half the Republican 
voters stayed away from the primary at which Johnson carried 
the State for Roosevelt. The enormity of the proposed plunder- 
ing will probably bring them out in full strength, and it is not 
impossible that they will upset Johnson's plan. That is his 
gamble. 

Newspapers that leaned to Roosevelt in the primary, or took 
little part in that contest, are now asking uncomfortable ques- 
tions about the right of the Governor to use for his own politi- 
cal ends a party designation that he has violently repudiated. 
Some of them are looking up Johnson's political morals and 
beginning to talk of the tactics that made Works Senator. There 
is some significant sarcasm abroad throughout the State con- 
cerning the "Thou-Shalt-Not-Steal" war cry. Hiram is appar- 
ently on the way to a struggle in which he has not all the advan- 
tage, and that is not the kind of contest the so-called "fighting 
Governor" of California relishes. 



Fish in Abundance 
At Low Prices. 



Go to any physician with your 
digestion disordered, or let him 
make up your diet list after severe 
illness, operative or not, and he 
will send you to the "short-fibred" meats for the basis of your 
eating, if meats you must have. That means the white meats, 
with veal limited and pork excepted. Particularly he will 
recommend fish ; he will advise you to keep away from all meats 
save fowl flesh, and he will urge that you partake of fish as 
the best substitute for meats. Almost any practitioner of mod- 
ern schooling will tell you that we eat altogether too much meat 
and not nearly enough fish. He will tell you that humanity can 
keep well nourished and strong without any meat at all, if it 
will use fish freely. 

And you will be told by the same authority that few people 
know how to select and prepare fish for the table so as to make 
it both palatable and nutritious. There is no other item in the 
list of foodstuffs so little understood and so little used in this 
country and this part of the country, yet no other is so abund- 
ant, no other more safe or more valuable in its content of nour- 
ishment. There is need of a campaign of education on this 
point. It will pay the State to undertake it. 

A great and good work is being done by the State University 
in showing the farmer how to work his land to better purpose. 
Money is spent liberally through this channel to teach the pub- 
lic what to eat and how to prepare it. The big railroads conduct 
elaborate and persistent campaigns to the same end. Why 
should not the State, which is supposed to work for the best in- 
terests of all the people of the State, show them how they can 
live more cheaply and better? Why should not the railroads, 
which will have the business of hauling fish from the sea to 
the interior consumer, help to educate the catcher and the eater 
of food from that vast farm, the ocean? 

Fish on these shores is the most abundant article of diet to 
be had. It will be the cheapest when people eat it every day. 
The "fish-on-Friday" tradition has no basis in sound sense. 
Fish is good any day, every day. Here the variety is wide, the 
supply constant, the items tempting. As soon as the public 
finds out the facts, this will be a seven-days-a-week fish mar- 
ket. Then the price of both fish and meat will go down and 
stay down. 



July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



Pure food laws avail to protect the 

Adulterated Honey in consumer who buys original pack- 

Unlabeled Containers, ages, but how about the patron of 

restaurants which serve relishes, 

condiments and the like out of their own unlabeled containers? 

This question is suggested by experience with the "honey" 
purveyed in some San Francisco cafes that ask and get prices 
good enough to entitle their customers to protection from adul- 
terants. If much of the stuff put out for honey in restaurants is 
not heavily loaded with glucose or other cheap substitutes for 
the natural article, then may we never again enjoy honey on 
our waffles! 

Possibly it is not within the province of Federal inspectors 
to ascertain and report the practices of restaurant men in this 
respect. If so, then we put the matter up to State and city 
authorities for their prompt attention. There is not merely the 
interest of the consumer, whose good is the aim of all pure 
food law and machinery, but the interest also of one of the 
State's important industries. The honey producer and packer 
dare not vend his goods for other than what they are. He must 
put nothing but pure honey under that label, on pain of severe 
punishment and damaging publicity. The restaurant man who 
sells adulterated honey is injuring the man who eats the sophis- 
ticated stuff, and he is also striking at the producer who obeys 
the law. 

It is a kind of civic as well as economic crime for a California 
restaurant man to use an imported and adulterated substitute 
for a staple California product like honey. We hope some of 
these cheaters of the pure food laws and damagers of the 
State's good name will be brought to book. The evidence is 
easy to get. Any man who knows anything about honey will 
need only a look and a taste to spot the adulterated article. 

The voters of the United States 
Three "Paramount" Issues, are now face to face with three 

"paramount" issues, to wit: ul- 
tra progressiveism, as voiced by Colonel Roosevelt; sane pro- 
gressiveism as voiced by Woodrow Wilson; conservatism, as 
voiced by William H. Taft. In the selection of an "ism" to 
meet the requirements of the nation, the electorate will be ex- 
pected to apply the most rigid rules of high analysis. From 
one and the same viewpoint the three "isms" differ widely in 
appearance and purpose. The Colonel's "ism" appears to be 
a compound mixture of socialism, populism and imperialism. 
Mr. Wilson's "ism" is a mixture of Bryanism and Jeffersonian- 
ism; and Mr. Taft's conservatism is as unfashionable as old 
Father Grimes' coat that "buttoned all down before," but each 
of the three "isms" constitute "paramount" issues and prin- 
ciples of government, so the several candidates say. Each one 
of the "isms" is an unimproved highway leading in the direc- 
tion of the White House, and each "ism" believes itself the 
nation's savior. The alleged fundamentals of the Colonel's 
"ism" is almost unnatural solicitude for the welfare of the com- 
mon people, but the program is in a gilt frame of Hamiltonian- 
ism, which does not admit that the people, as a whole, are 
capable of self government, and that a government by the peo- 
ple is a political misnomer — a stupendous misfit. The Colonel 
has himself said that he is a firm believer in Hamilton's theory 
of government, only that to fool the unthinking he makes the 
recall of the judiciary one of the props of the throne when he 
reaches it — a principle of government that all the fathers of 
the republic abhorred, as have all real statesmen in all the years 
of the republic, because in the last analysis of the recall it is 
found to mean that the defeated litigant in a law suit may drive 
up his friends and have them sign a petition for the recall of 



the judge for not ruling in favor of the litigant, thus placing 
the court at the mercy of the defeated plaintiff or defendant, as 
may be. Yet the Colonel would have the courts surrounded by 
disgruntled litigants seeking revenge for unfavorable decisions. 
Yet the recall is the Colonel's trump card in his political game. 
His next best card is his own personality, which always sug- 
gests a superheated imagination, a nervous ailment that usually 
runs into hysterics and blinds the eyes to the fact that for more 
than sixty years the president has been either a Republican or 
a Democrat, and the people have no inclination to change the 
time-honored custom, and ever since the birth of the republic 
the people have kept the door to three times to the White 
House bolted and locked. The Colonel's new philosophy con- 
tradicts the essentials of true Democracy, a theory of govern- 
ment by agents or representatives of the majority of the people 
conducting the machinery of the nation in the interest of and 
for the best good of all the people. The Colonel says himself 
that he proposes to appeal for indorsement of his "isms" to the 
farmers and working people, which is not democratic, but sec- 
tionalism and casteism. 

38r 
Rhode Island, the smallest State in 
Rhode Island Leads the Union, with an area of only 

In Road Improvement. 1,250 square miles, ranks first of all 
States in its percentage of improved 
roads. Under the direction of Secretary Wilson, a very com- 
prehensive statistical investigation of the mileage and cost of 
public roads in the United States has recently been completed 
by the office of public roads, United States Department of 
Agriculture. 

This document reveals many interesting facts. Thus, appar- 
ently, it is not because of her small size that Rhode Island is 
able to boast of 49.14 per cent of improved roads, for Delaware, 
with an area of 2,050 square miles, has only 6.22 per cent of 
improved roads. On the other hand, Massachusetts, with an 
area of 8,315 square miles, has 49 per cent of her roads im- 
proved, or very nearly the same percentage as Rhode Island. 
The size of the State, therefore, seems to have little or no 
effect on the percentage of improved roads. 

The investigations further show that there are 2,199,645 
miles of public roads in continental United States. Of this 
vast mileage only 190,476, or 8.66 per cent, are classed as im- 
proved. 

Rhode Island leads with 49.14 per cent of improved roads, 
while Massachusetts is second with 49 per cent. Indiana fol- 
lows with 37.6 per cent; Ohio, Connecticut, New Jersey, Ken- 
tucky, Vermont and California follow in a descending ordei; 
the latter having 17.87 per cent of improved roads. The States 
of Wisconsin, New York, Maryland, Utah, Tennessee, South 
Carolina, Maine and Michigan range in the order given from 
16 to 10 per cent. 

Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Minnesota, New Hamp 
shire and Oregon have between 5 and 10 per cent of their roacH 
improved. Of the twenty-two States with less than 5 per cent 
of improved roads, North Dakota stands at the bottom with 
cnly 0.23 per cent. Secretary Wilson and Director Page, who is 
in charge of the office of public roads, are ever at work on the 
problems which confront the road builders throughout the land, 
and especially those problems which are most frequently con- 
fronted by communities in which road improvement has made 
but little progress. 

ar 

Developments in Morocco are inclining Spain to be 

thankful that France, and not she, is holding the bag. 

The banks of Ireland show an enormous gain in savings 

deposits over 1911. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 



The Question of 
A Water Supply. 



There is an abundant supply of 
pure, good water stored in the 
Sierra range and foothills that is 
obtainable, at considerable cost, of 
course, but not at greater cost than the necessity of an inex- 
haustible supply for the bay cities justifies. In fact, cost of 
storing the Sierra waters and of the necessary accessorial 
service, such as conduits and distributing mains, is hardly to 
be considered. An emergency confronts the bay cities, and it 
is worth the price of immunity from the danger of a water 
famine. 

The whole problem resolves itself into facts : the fact that 
San Francisco is on the brink of facing a shortage of water ; the 
fact that the Spring Valley Company has to depend in a large 
degree on rain precipitations to supply the demand renders it 
too weak, uncertain and unreliable as a permanent source of 
water supply, and the fact that the Hetch-Hetchy project has 
proved itself untenable, if not altogether visionary, creates 
a situation that may be said to be alarming. 

Perhaps the Spring Valley sources of water accumulation 
would be adequate to supply the San Francisco of to-day and 
of the immediate future if the means of distribution were im- 
proved, but in casting about for an additional supply for the 
future, requirements of a very much greater San Francisco 
should be reckoned with. The time will come when Greater 
San Francisco will include all the bay cities, and a large dis- 
trict of the peninsula, but without a reliable source of water 
supply for all in interest in the scheme to greatly extend the 
corporate limits of this city, "Greater San Francisco" is not at 
all likely to go beyond the dream state. It would be halted 
by "hope deferred." This analysis of the situation as to the 
question of a proper water supply and of a greater San Fran- 
cisco expresses the thought and the desire of the people of 
the entire bay region. If that be true, which it undoubtedly is, 
it becomes apparent at once that the demand of the bay region 
for the near future is for a never-failing water supply. The 
demand is imperative. It implies that San Francisco's expan- 
sion in territory and population is contingent on an inexhaust- 
ible supply of water for domestic use, and for fire protection. 
It is the one great problem facing San Francisco, and as long 
as it remains an unsolved problem, no great expansion of San 
Francisco need be expected or hoped for. If the improvement 
clubs of the Sunset and Richmond districts will consider this 
phase of the question first, and when a great volume of water 
is at hand demand an extension of distributing mains, much 
good will result. The Spring Valley Company would be foolish 
if it should extend its mains until such time as the water is at 
hand to fill them. 

jsr 

Tell us, Mayor Rolph — or maybe 
A Case Where the Public you can tell us, City Attorney 
Health is Concerned. Long — what is holding up the gar- 

bage incinerator project? When 
the public votes bonds for a specific purpose; when the bonds 
are sold and the money is in hand ; when the property necessary 
to the carrying out of the project can be acquired and title 
vested in the city — we say that when these things have been 
legally and properly done, and yet the proposition is pigeon- 
holed for years, dropped out of sight, apparently abandoned, 
there is some explanation due the people. Let's have the ex- 
planation. At the next meeting of the Board of Supervisors 
some representative of the public, some one of the excellent 
business men and good citizens now serving the municipality 
as lawmakers, should put this question squarely and bluntly 
up to the responsible officers and find out what is the matter. 



It is conceivable that somebody with an axe of selfish in- 
terest to grind "reached" somebody connected with the former 
administration, and did it so effectually that the new adminis- 
tration has not yet had time to unbury the proposition. Things 
like that could happen prior to the incoming of the present 
regime : they did happen. 

But now there can be no evading of explanation. The public 
which voted the bonds and incurred the debt is entitled to that 
much, even if it hasn't and can't get the new incinerator. 

Whatever the reason for the side-tracking of the project, the 
results as far as the public interest is concerned are not cheerful 
to contemplate. The private concern which runs the present 
inadequate and antiquated crematory is enabled for years to 
hold on to a monopoly to which it clung hard in the courts. 
That monopoly was finally broken and the city's right to estab- 
lish its own incinerator was fully established. Perhaps the 
owners of the present crematory have found a way to do by pri- 
vate negotiation what they were unable to accomplish openly 
by means of litigation. We make no such charge, but we do 
count that as among the possibilities. 

The lack of information on the subject, however, promotes 
the suspicion that some powerful and deep-hidden interest has 
stopped not only work on, but all talk about, the incinerator. 
It ought not to be very difficult to pull this interest out into the 
open and see how and where it has been operating. 

Mr. Mayor, and Messrs. Various Officials, this is not a sub- 
ject for any more dallying or wriggling. The public demands 
to know, and it is not inclined to be patient with delay. Sup- 
pose you answer now. 

The act of the Women's Federation concerning pen- 
sions for widowed mothers of young children ought to be sup- 
plemented by everybody's boosting. Mothers, as a species, 
are vanishing faster than the elk and the buffalo. Vital sta- 
tistics for 1911 in California show that in the great race the 
stork has beaten the Grim Reaper by only 816 units. That's a 
mighty puny margin for so vast a commonwealth. A pension 
that will enable widowed mothers who lack means to stay at 
home with their children, care for and educate them, is simply 
justice — not charity. It will cost far less than now goes to 
reclaim and reform wayward ones, not to mention the total loss 
crime and insanity represent. The provision California makes, 
$6.25 a month for each of its dependent wards up to twelve 
years of age, is probably as much as could be made until we 
become better educated along these lines, but many who should 
benefit by it do not, because it is administered as charity. In- 
stead, it ought to be regarded as bounty rightly coming to 
them for exceptional bravery and good service. 



ORIGINAL 

PLYMOUTH 

DRY GIN 

The Critical Consumer Always 
Specifies Plymouth 

THE FINEST DRY GIN IMPORTED 

ALEX D. SHAW & CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents 

214 Front Street, San Francisco 




,— — ~ — — ' . ■ _ * ; -. ' > 





"Hear the Crier? Who the devil art thou?" "One that will play the deril, sir, with you." 




, i ; , _ 



During the election on the everlasting question, "Equal 

votes for women," the men of California were roundly railed 
at by the suffragists for trying to dodge the question. At the 
recent meeting of the Federation of Women's Clubs the same 
question was laid on the autopsy table for final judgment- — 
and very adroitly tucked out of sight. That move saved their 
gathering from the fate of the Chicago and Baltimore Con- 
ventions. 

The blaze in the dailies over the remarkable feats of the 

athletes in the present Olympiad have roused the envy of a 
number of athletically inclined Eastern girls, and they pro- 
pose to show the world what the modern Atalantas can do. 
Whoever succeeds in staging the show on schedule time de- 
serves first prize. 

And now the newspapers declare that President Gomez 

of Cuba adroitly engineered the recent little rebellion there in 
order to show the haughty foreign nations how easily he could 
suppress it. That is one on his neighbor, President Madero, 
of Mexico, and incidentally a jolt, not a joke, on Gomez 
himself. 

One of the members of the convention of Federation of 



Women's Clubs was asked to furnish an article on the proceed- 
ings of a certain meeting. The article arrived at the office 
early, followed by a series of postscripts that were still trailing 
to the editorial desk when the paper went to press. 

It's an extraordinary wind in Kansas that doesn't blow 

a man some kind of trouble. After a recent cyclone a farmer 
picked up a wind-tossed pocketbook containing $4,000. The 
currency has been seized by the sheriff, and the finder now has 
three lawsuits on his hands. 

At a recent local political meeting a well known suffra- 
gette attempted "to throw" her influence at the new Third party, 
with the result that she hit the slate and broke up the meeting. 
Friends are now urging her to take lessons of a baseball pitcher 
before the campaign opens. 

A Los Angeles man, in the exuberance of drinking in the 

ozone there, was tempted by a facetious companion to take a 
chaser of a pint of gasoline. He promptly thought he was a 
speeding motor car, and met with the usual result — run in for 
exceeding the limit. 

"For sale at the Republican and Democratic Convention 

Halls at Chicago and Baltimore, a miscellaneous lot of unused 
planks for political campaign purposes; and a job lot of candi- 
dates' banners, boosters, rooters and choice megaphone invec- 
tives." 

"Invisible" bathing suits have been pronounced taboo by 

the Councilmen of a Southern California surf bathing town, and 
now the authorities are being besieged by applicants who want 
to be appointed beach inspectors. 

What is Hearst going to do with his noun' dawg now? 



After looking over the wreckage left by the Chicago 

and Baltimore conventions, Denver decided that $20,000 was 
all it could afford to risk on the Third Party meeting. The risk 
was referred to a steam roller committee, with the usual result. 

A Stanford graduate recently claimed a Los Angeles 

belle as his bride, according to an unusually reliable contem- 
porary. What's ailing sleepless Los Angeles? For the first 
time on record an outsider has managed to get in a first claim. 

Two wrangling lawyers called each other liars during 

the trial of a case in the Superior Court this week, and the 
Judge declined to fine them, on the ground that he was unable 
to determine which one was wrong. 

Thirty tramps in Wilkesbarre, Pa., have recently been 

forced by the authorities to play baseball while held in the 
lockup. Apparently the idea is to keep up their spirits, while 
confined, by chasing highballs. 

"Tax the bachelors" is the only plank in the platform of 

Mrs. Coply Baum, who is being trained to run for Mayor of 
San Diego — and every woman in the county has enthusiasti- 
cally taken up the plank. 

"See America first" is a new organization recently 

launched in Chicago. If the promoters desire to make it a 
success they should begin in California, where the best in 
the land is to be seen. 

Tax-dodgers had better begin to practice jiu-jitsu, in or- 
der to accomplish their nefarious ends; the Federation of Wo- 
men's Clubs decided at their last meeting to root the dodgers 
into the open. 

Since the roar of battle rolled away from Baltimore, 

the Bird of Peace has been dazedly perching on the horizon, 
and watching with rising fear the moosetracks heading for 
Chicago. 

Sage old James J. Hill has quit railroading to go fishing, 

but not in Wall street, where the younger generation of Goulds 
have lost their bait, themselves and most of their fishing tackle. 

It cost a number of Democratic candidates a fat pot of 

money to discover that their chances of the nomination were 
far from being ripe, despite their trainers' dope sheets. 

The Third Party should pack its convention duds and 

make moosetracks for the wilderness: the socialists have 
joined the anvil chorus and proclaim it useless. 

In leading a protest against the movement for Greater 

San Francisco, Oakland is denying the cordial hand that has 
helped her steadily, especially since the big fire. 

The windmills of the country are acquiring more action 

since the recent political conventions adjourned. 

Woodrow Wilson has now changed his name to Will 

Run Wilson. 




s^^: t - /^ 




_, ^. , . -w^. 



aK£^. 




The moving pictures of Paul Rainey's African hunt, being 
exhibited at a local play house, to the ecstatic joy of the small 
boy, brings to mind the fact that we have mighty few hunters 
of our own. Stewart Edward White and his charming wife fol- 
lowed close in the footsteps of the famous Teddy, and had 
many thrilling experiences. In fact, so very thrilling were some 
of these that Mrs. White confided to one of her friends that 
while it was all very fine, and a wonderful experience, it was 
good to get back to a country where the wildest thing to be seen 
on their daily travels was a sad-faced horse or a vicious auto- 
mobile. 

An amusing story in this connection, said to have been told 
\y Mrs. White over one of the tea tables, at Santa Barbara, 
came to the ears of the Lookeron the other day. 

The Whites and their party had reached Nairobi on the re- 
turn trip after a very successful journey. Shortly after their 
arrival they had the good fortune to meet some English people 
who owned a splendid estate on the outskirts of the town, and 
who insisted on entertaining them during their stay. Their 
hosts were hospitality itself, and nothing was left undone to 
further their pleasure; but that which pleased Mrs. White 
more than anything else was the lovely, old-fashioned garden 
which served as a setting for the beautiful home. With its lux- 
uriant flowers and tropical palms laid out in quaint geometrical 
figures, it brought to the visitor's mind pictures of a similar 
garden in far-away Santa Barbara. Through its midst ran a 
small stream, whose banks were fringed with long grasses, and 
here it was that Mrs. White would bring her writing materials 
and easy chair for the long letters home. 

One afternoon, sitting in her accustomed place, she began a 
letter to a California friend. Her hostess was taking her after- 
noon siesta, and only the occasional hum of an insect disturbed 
the deathlike stillness. "You cannot fancy," wrote Mrs. White, 
"the joy of finding a garden such as this in the heart of Africa. 
And the loveliest part about it is the atmosphere of peace and 
seclusion which wrap it round. For days and days we have 
been traveling through a country literally infested with fierce 
animals, our lives in continual danger, and the quiet of this 
beautiful retreat is as soothing as a narcotic. It would be im- 
possible to imagine its tranquility disturbed — lurking dangers 
seem far away — and the fear of wild beasts is gradually depart- 
mg 

Here Mrs. White looked up from her portfolio, and straight 
into the mean little eyes of a bull rhinoceros which had ambled 
up the middle of the shallow little stream, and stood not twenty 
feet away, regarding her curiously. 

Discretion is the better part of valor, and Mrs. White did not 
remain to finish her letter. 

5 S s 

Another California hunter who antedated the trip of the 
Whites, and who set a record for the Colonel, with none of the 
Colonel's noise, was Miss Annie Alexander of Oakland, daugh- 
ter of the well-known Honolulu banker, who, by the way, was 
killed by a landslide while making this trip with his daughter. 

Miss Alexander was the only child of an indulgent parent, 
and when she expressed a wish, even to shoot lions, she got it. 
She was a crack shot and absolutely fearless, and the natives 
in her train regarded her with no little awe and wonderment. 
Her expedition into Africa, which was taken seven or eight 
years ago, from the point of hunting was a great success. She 
bagged an elephant or two, several lions, rhinoceroses, elands, 



cheetahs, water bucks and Grant's gazelles. She is said to be 
the first woman to have established such a record in big game 
hunting. 

On her return to California, however, she still pined for the 
great open places and the fascination of big game stalking. 
With the fever of the hunt still in her veins, she fitted out an 
expedition for the far-away shores of Alaska and the Frozen 
North, and set forth in pursuit of the elusive mountain sheep, 
the clumsy polar bear and the great slothful walrus. From this 
jaunt she brought back many valuable specimens, some of 
which may be seen mounted and on good behavior in the 
museum of natural history at the University of California, 
o" S B 

Speaking of mighty hunters brings to mind the never-to-be- 
forgotten expedition of Lawrence, the balloon photographer. 
Lawrence was a well known figure in San Francisco shortly af- 
ter the fire, and his pictures of the ruined area snapped from 
the high vantage point of his floating car were sent from one 
end of the country to the other. A short time after the dis- 
aster, he conceived the idea of hunting big game in Africa with 
the aid of a balloon. He argued that the animals, which were 
ever on the alert for an enemy on the ground, would not be 
looking for danger from above, and in that way the balloon 
hunter would be enabled to come very close to his prey with- 
out being discovered. 

It sounded good, and the photographer soon had a number 



Back to Nature's Food -n 




With the Summer days comes a desire for closer contact with Na- 
ture and for a simpler, more rational diet. When you get back to 
Nature you will want to get back to Nature's food. A dainty, 
delicious delight for the Summer days is 

Shredded Wheat Biscuit 

and Blackberries 

or other berries served with milk or cream. It means health, strength and 
Summer joy. Shreddtd Wheat Is a simple, natural elemental food — con- 
taining; no yeast, baklngpowder or chemicals of any kind— just pure wheat 
made digestible by steam-cooking, shredding and baking Into crisp golden 
brown Biscuits. 

Nothing mo whr.]esonic ami nmimhing and nothing bo ea»)T to prepare Because 
of Its BlnCiiit form and tU porous ibred«. Shredded Wheat U the ■•u\y brook f nut 
cm-. -ill thnt oombiau iii.iiiFi.liy with borriof and other Ireih fruit*. 
Heat one or more BUcuili in the oven to roatora criipnotn and then cover with 
hlackbarrii'R or other borr lei. Serve with milk or cream and nwaoten totult th>< taxte 

TRISCUIT is the Shredded Wheat Wafer, a crisp, tasty toast eaten with 
butter, soft cheese or marmalades, A delicious snack for the- camp or the 
bungalow— for picnics or excursions on land or sea. 



The Shredded Wheat Company 



Niagara Falls, N. Y. 



July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



of wealthy men interested, with the result that an expedition 
was fitted out at an expense of $250,000, and the party was soon 
on the way to the interior. While several of them were good 
huntsmen, the main object of the trip was to secure pictures, 
and every conceivable photographic contrivance was added to 
the fittings of the car. Wilh the first trial, however, it was dis- 
covered that one great drawback to work in the balloon had 
been overlooked. The big car cast an enormous shadow, which 
so frightened the animals that it became a very difficult thing 
to come within photographing distance. However, by careful 
calculations, and with many narrow escapes, the adventurous 
balloonists managed to get some very fine pictures. 

They were on the return trip, and, as they thought, well out 
of the danger zone, when they were treated to the narrowest 
escape of all. They had wandered into a little missionary vil- 
lage one Wednesday evening at dusk. Now, as every one 
knows, Wednesday is prayer meeting night, and so after sup- 
per every one repaired to the little church on the edge of the 
town. The services had been brought to a close, and the con- 
gregation had gathered on the church steps preparatory to leav- 
ing for home, when a hideous Bedlam of noise burst upon their 
ears. Almost before they realized it, a herd of terrified zebras 
came dashing by with a huge lion in close pursuit. Even as the 
worshipers scattered for shelter the great beast seized one of 
its fleeing quarry, and bounding up the church steps, dragged 
it within the doors, and there devoured it before the eyes of the 
Lawrence party, who had taken refuge in the pulpit. That they 
were not served up as an entree was probably due to the fact 
that there was so much of the zebra. 
5 ?r sr 

A bluff gets over, some of the time, but there's always dan- 
ger of its being called. The patient populace of this town has 
climbed over and around — or been ditched by — the various 
street obstructions for lo! these many moons. We seem to think 
there's no help for it. The unavoidable confusion after the 
great fire got us "halter broke" to it; six years continuance 
seems to have got us "hog tied;" and the object of these few 
words is merely to present an aspect of the situation that seems 
to have been overlooked. 

Of the thousands recently in attendance at the biennial of 
Women's Federated Clubs most of them, we can fairly hope, 
will return to their homes in all parts of the world under the 
impression that the turmoil is a necessary preliminary to the 
1915 Fair, but a very considerable number visit us at more or 
less frequent intervals, and they have learned to look upon as 
landmarks the same old trenching at Third-Market-Geary, and 
Sutter-Market-Sansome, and the condition of Howard street, 
as revealed in a trip over Fourth from the Townsend street de- 
pot greets them on each visit like an old, though not beloved, 
acquaintance. These people have had their doubts for some 
time, but they doubt no longer, if the word of one is to be re- 
garded. She says: "If it take San Francisco a year and a half 
to install one pipe line in one street, how long will it take her 
to complete an Exposition of the magnitude projected?" Do 
you know the answer ? 

! 5 I 

Bob Shand, erstwhile sporting editor, soccer football writer 
and fight promoter, is a Scotchman of the first water, and light- 
ning quick to take up the cudgels in defense of his native 
land and his countrymen. 

The other day he made one of a group of newspaper and 
sporting men who were discussing with much warmth the out- 
come of the recent Wolgast-Rivers fight in Los Angeles. Sev- 
eral had been present at the battle, and expressed their different 
opinions in no uncertain terms. All the post mortem stuff was 
gone over. One of the group went on to show just how, with 



a little forethought, Wolgast could have put the Mexican out 
for fair, while another took just the opposite side of the ques- 
tion, and advanced as his opinion that Rivers could have had 
things all his own way by sending a different sort of a blow at 
one stage of the fray. 

Gradually the talk veered away from the fight proper, while 
every fellow present had an anecdote to tell illustrating the 
weight which some insignificant detail will often carry in de- 
termining the outcome of a battle, and there immediately 
flashed into the mind of one of the listeners that old story 
of Robert Bruce and the spider. How Bruce, when the tide of 
war seemed utterly turned against him, took refuge in an old 
barn, and there flung himself down to rest. As he lay there, 
exhausted, his attention was caught by a tiny spider weaving its 
web. Time and again the fragile line broke, only to be re- 
covered and fastened once more. Finally she succeeded in 
making it secure, and so impressed was the Scotchman with 
the remarkable perseverance displayed that, filled with new 
energy, he went forth and carried his armies to victory. You've 
all heard the story. Most of us imbibed it with our Scotch his- 
tory, and some of us with our Scotch highballs. 

"Oh, Bob," cried the facetious one, catching sight of Shand, 
"d'you remember the time Robert Bruce laid down " 

The big Scotchman was on his feet in a minute. 

"It's a lie," he yelled, towering over the astonished reporter. 
"Robert Bruce never laid down in his life!" 




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Liikwy TsiMb 



San Francisco News Letter 
a 



July 13, 1912. 



"In Cotton Wool." 



There is a very minute detail in W. 
B. Maxwell's study of egotism, 
which he puts into his new novel, 
"In Cotton Wool." It is not an agreeable analysis, nor does it 
at first seem worth while, except as an example of beautiful 
workmanship and of quick understanding. In a foreword we 
are given some idea of the novel's ethical matrix: 

"As society is now constituted, a man with a moderate but 
assured income can find people who in exchange for his money 
will perform for him nearly all the duties of manhood, and, 
as though he were something infinitely delicate and inestimably 
precious, he may thus wrap himself in cotton wool and evade 
the shocks and perils of active existence." 

The hero is one Lenny Calcraft, who at the age of 35 finds 
himself caring for an invalid father and consecrated on the al- 
tar of adulation in a small English seaside resort. He is the 
pink of fashion and the mold of form, and his whole existence 
is spent between the sick chamber and the haberdashery. The 
social leader, the club hanger-on, the dabbler in charities, 
"Lenny" lets everything pass him, save in the one instance of 
his father, who at irritable moments speaks his mind, but whose 
old age has attached itself to Lenny like barnacles to a ship. 
In this atmosphere "Lenny" finds a girl whom he believes 
he loves. But when she goes to town and he follows her, when 
she attends his beck and call out of pure devotion, he says he 
cannot marry her because of his father. And this excuse leads 
to others, until he has worn out the sensation that had once 
swept over him, and after poignant scenes he leaves the girl and 
goes on his downward way, through weakness, we should say, 
rather than through the banal influence of luxury. Of the lat- 
ter he had but little after the death of old Calcraft. And let 
it here be said that the final scenes with the old man are 
sketched in a masterly way and all that formal falseness at- 
tendant upon his death. 

At every step "Lenny" allows opportunities to slip from him. 
It was lack of inclination that kept him out of the Boer war; 
he danced attendance instead at tea parties. Everywhere he 
"shirked the effort," as the author demonstrates in every in- 
cident connected with the bachelor's lonely life. Once more 
he is drawn toward a wealthy widow, whose energy of mind is 
enough to wear him out, and when they are about to be married 
he quietly decides that it is too much, and slips easily from it. 
Such a man has a penalty to pay, and Calcraft now proceeds 
to pay it. 

At the club, as one character puts it, he began to dig his 
grave with his teeth. Having no initiative, he seeks alone the 
enjoyment of indulgences. The years creep past him, and, 
though he is generous with his money, his heart is empty. And, 
as the character is drawn by Mr. Maxwell, he deserves all the 
evil that fell upon him. The cleverness of the delineation lies 
in the palpable feeling of old age that begins to settle on the 
hero. His friends out in the active world gain their rewards, 
but at every turn he fails because he has failed, as Browning 
said, to make the absolute best of himself and of this life of his. 
As far as the emotional make-up of the man is concerned, he 
only sought self-gratification. He lived to see the first woman 
he had presumably loved married to a man he had befriended 
in his social days; in a weak and foolish manner he tries to 
win her back, and is no better than the old roue such as Mans- 
field used to play on the stage in the days now gone. He lived 
to read, in his lonely club, of the death of the second woman, 
and his past rose up as gall to sicken him with dread. He 
tried, as the last straw before the entire engulfing of an aged 
bachelor, to attach himself to a light and frivolous person, 
whose sole aim was to draw money from him, for her theatrical 
ventures. And from her he soundly hears of his decay. 

There comes a period when a man cannot regenerate, no 
matter how much he might wish to. "Lenny" Calcraft's life 
rises up before him a failure, and all the more poignant in its 
dissolution beside the serviceable lives of those who had long 
ago been his friends. The whole matter preys upon his mind, 
and he snaps under the weight. As one of the characters said :' 
"His whole life had been one long preparation for madness." 
The final scenes are in the asylum. 

"In Cotton Wool." By W. B. Maxwell. D. Appleton & Co 
$1.30 net. 



$72.50 



To Chicago and Return 
on the Peerless 

Golden State Limited 

A Transcontinental Delight 



This rate good on many days in 
July, August and September. 

Similar low rates to many other 
Eastern points. 

Return limit October 31st, 1912. 

Telephone or write our agents. 



Rock Island 
Southern Pacific 



July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 




Emperor Francis Joseph is near- 
Emperor Francis Joseph's ing the end of his long reign over 
Reign Nearing Its End. Austria-Hungary, and all Europe 

is in a state of excitement, and 
diplomatists are figuring out what international complications 
are likely to follow on the heels of the old Emperor's demise. 
That a dangerous situation may present itself, the capitals are 
quite agreed, and there are grave fears that the Archduke Fer- 
dinand will be dangerously progressive when he reaches the 
throne. The young Duke will be confronted at the start by 
many political and social entanglements, and he is not the sort 
of a man to take two bites at a cherry. It may be said of him 
that he is the most ambitious young prince in Europe. He is 
an able and fearless soldier, and autocratic to the last degree. 
Had he not been restrained by his aged uncle he would have 
involved the Turkish empire in a war with Austria three years 
ago. "On to Salonika" is his hobby. But the one great danger 
that confronts him is a possible if not a probable revolution in 
his own country. The population of the empire is made up of 
many races, and for years they have been dissatisfied. Al- 
though the Slav and the Hungarian elements dominate, the 
unrest permeates the entire population. The trouble is mostly 
political, but the weakest spot in the new order of things is to be 
found in the social life of the country. Ferdinand is capable 
enough to reign, but he has reason to estrange the entire royal 
family following. It is well known that Ferdinand did not 
marry a woman of his social equal, but in and out of season 
has defended her against the intrigues of the court circle. Un- 
less Francis Joseph issues a decree before he dies, the new 
queen or empress will not be recognized as a legitimate mem- 
ber of the imperial set, nor will her children be in line for the 
throne. Rather than submit to too much of that kind of social 
ostracism, Ferdinand has declared that he would court a for- 
eign war or plunge his country into a revolution. A year ago 
the Kaiser publicly complimented Ferdinand on the heroic 
stand he took in defense of his wife, but that only widened 
the gap that separated the prospective empress from the court 
set, The masses, however, are with Ferdinand and his wife as 
against the court, and he could rely upon their support in the 
event of foreign or domestic trouble. At the same time, the 
masses of Austria-Hungary are restless and dissatisfied. This, 
Archduke Ferdinand knows, and he knows that he is the army's 
idol. He also knows that Hungary is ripe for independence, al- 
though he is very popular in Hungary. On the other hand, all 
the Balkan States would get under his flag is a war with Tur- 
key. Thus the new emperor of Austria, who is also King of 
Hungary, has enough political and social complications to fur- 
nish reasons for a domestic revolution or foreign war. His 
close friends at the court and in the army have said all along 
that when he came to the throne he would be aggressive, first 
putting the army on the best possible fighting basis. Austria 
is essentially a Germanic State, but the Italian, Hungarian 
and Slav races have never been over-friendly with the German 
citizens. 

Italy is beginning to groan under the burden of war, and 

the masses are grumbling about high taxes and the high cost 
of living, which they attribute to the nation's war to acquire 
the Turkish province of Tripoli. There are no signs of a pro- 
test against carrying on the war, but there is danger of a revo- 
lution to overturn the monarchy. However, the government 
knows that if it can hold Tripoli and give the masses a new 
field for exploitation, all talk about dissatisfaction will 
promptly end in general rejoicing. 

The islanders in the Egean Sea have petitioned the 

signatory powers to protect them while under Italian rule 
against a Turkish expedition to recapture the islands. The 
islanders say they prefer Italian rule to Turkish rule. 

Constantinople reports that the Italians are preparing to 

attack Smyrna by land and water. Over 50,000 Turkish troops 
are en route to defend the place. 



. Yuan Shi Kai believes that in twenty-five years China 

will be a nation to which all the other nations will be pleased 
to take off their hats to, both as a commercial and as a military 
nation. 

"American interests in the Orient" seem to be bothering 

Germany and Russia. American interests in the Far East are 
pretty sure to be protected in any event. 

. The White Star line of trans-Atlantic vessels will pub- 
lish a daily paper on its ships while at sea. The telegraph ser- 
vice will be furnished by wireless. 

Greece is to have a new political party. Its purpose is 

to create a public sentiment favorable to the reannexation of 
Crete, now a Turkish possession. 

Mexico is likely to be worse off than ever. The rebel 

army is breaking up to form small squads to engage in the 
highway robbery business. 

The new republic of Portugal is too close to Spain to 

please the Spanish royalists. The influence is bad for the gold 
lace aristocracy. 

The Czar and Kaiser are holding a secret conference, 

and the world will never know what is the subject of their 
conversation. 

The Czar needs civilizing. He recently scolded an 

army officer because he declined to fight a duel with a fellow 
officer. 

, The detachment of U. S. marines in Cuba has been re- 
lieved, but the rebellion keeps right on bothering the govern- 
ment. 

— — -Premier Asquith seems to be as popular in Ireland as 
he is in England. He wants the Irish women to engage in 
politics. 

— —-British capitalists will finance a new railroad across 
Persia, which means that England has not lost her grip on that 
country. 

The German Emperor thinks he sees great profits in the 

Panama Canal route for his nation's shipowners. 

Australia is encouraging beet sugar culture. A beet 

sugar factory is being erected by public subscription. 

It is amazing how many European steamship companies 

are preparing to use the Panama Canal. 

— ■ — China is having no difficulty in borrowing all the money 
she wants from European money lenders. 

The Panama Canal zone is in danger of a little revolu- 
tion conducted by defeated politicians. 

— — The people of France are too busy in the money market 
to bother about war preparations. 

Boy scouts are now encouraged to do farm work in Eng- 
land and Germany. 

Taxi-horse cabs are the rage in London. 



, WILLIAMS > 

f Humbert]] 

^\ JEREZ. SPAIN j 

V SHERRY J 



FOR QUALITY, THE BEST 

In Bulk and Cases 

Charles Meinecke & Co. 

Aoihts Pacinc Com 314 SACRAMENTO ST.. S. T. 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



The Directors of the Kennett Consolidated Copper Companies offer the FIRST 
ALLOTMENT of 100,000 Shares, 7% Cumulative Preferred, Par value $3.00, 
each at $1.25 per share and 250,000 Shares Common Stock, Par value $3.00, 
at 75c per share. 

Kennett Consolidated Copper Companies 



Organized under the Laws of Arizona, July 5, 1911. Fully paid 
and Non-Assessable. 



Capital Stock 



$3,750,000.00 



1,250,000 shares, par value $3.00 each, divided into 350,000 

seven per cent Cumulative Preferred — Par Value, $3.00 each. 

900,000 Common Shares, Par Value $3.00 each. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

FRANK W. LEAVITT President 

(Twelve years Senator in the California Legislature.) 

WILLIAM K. KENT Vice-President and General Manager 

Attorney-at-Law, Mine Owner. 

EUGENE S. VAN COURT Secretary 

C. J. KENT Director E. M. KNOPH. . . .Director 

CONSULTING ENGINEER. 

EDWARD H. BENJAMIN, M. E., Many years President of the 

California Miners' Association. 

Properties Owned by the Kennett Consolidated Copper Companies 

1. Big Back Bone Group. 2. The Elsie Group. 3. Keystone 

These three groups of chiims comprise 50 U. S. Mining loca- 
tions, 20, 18 and 12 respectively, approximating 1,000 acres, 
and are situated in the Back Bone Mining District of the Shasta 
County Copper Belt, in Sections 18, 19 and 20, Township 34 
North, Range 5 West, about six miles by wagon road from the 
railroad and smelter town of Kennett on the Southern Pacific 
Railroad, 18 miles north of Redding, the county seat. 

They lie on the same belt as the Mountain Copper Company's 
(Iron Mountain) properties, the Trinity, Balaklala, Shasta 
King and Mammoth), and are less than two miles from the 
workings of the Mammoth Mine, a property owned by the 
United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company of Bos- 
ton, a corporation capitalized at $75,000,000. 

SHASTA COUNTY COPPER. 

The Shasta County Copper Belt already ranks fifth in the 
Copper production of the United States, and is one of the few 
copper districts where copper can be profitably mined when the 
metal is selling at less than 12 cents per pound. 

Copper is the chief product and the basis of the mining pros- 
perity and prospects of Shasta County, which is far in the lead 
of the mineral producing counties of the State of California. 

From 1894 to 1910, this county has produced copper of a 
value of over Fifty Million Dollars ($50,000,000.) 

Briefly summarized, the advantages of the Kennett Consoli- 
dated are : 

1. A porphyry copper — the kind that pays the biggest divi- 
dends. 

2. The properties cover an extensive mineralized area — nearly 
1,000 acres. 

3. Located in a copper belt ranking FIFTH IN PRODUC- 
TION in the United States. 

4. Adjacent to the greatest producing mine in California, a 
regular dividend payer. 

5. Surfaced and underground similarity to the other big mines 
of the district. 

6. Formation indicative of extensive ore bodies. 



7. Worked by tunnels, reducing working costs to a minimum. 
No expensive hoisting and pumping. 

8. Timber and water abundant. 

9. Smelters, power and railroads close at hand. 

10. Small capitalization for a big porphyry copper. 

11. First issues of stock at a very low price. 

12. Celebrated Engineer's report says : "The formation is 
identical with that of the MAMMOTH property, which it ad- 
joins, and when I first examined the MAMMOTH property in 
1896 there was no better showing at that time than there is now 
on the Big Back Bone property." 

This is the first great Porphyry Copper stock ever offered in 
the United States on such a small capitalization. 

For six years the properties have been developed by the 
owners on a business basis and with their own capital. They 
will continue to be so managed for the profit of all. 

They have now reached the stage where large capital is ab- 
solutely necessary to continue operations on a large scale and 
provide diamond drills, machinery, etc. 

It is assumed that the proceeds of this First Issue will furnish 
all the capital required, and make of the properties another 
"Mammoth" Mine. They have everything that the "Mammoth" 
had ten years ago. Expert Copper Engineers' reports say they 
are equally as good. Capital can make them just as valuable. 
At the present market price of copper (171/2 cents per pound) 
the "Mammoth" is yielding an annual profit of two million 
dollars. 

Just think of a profit of $2,000,000 on such a small capitaliza- 
tion as ours. 

Such are the possibilities of these properties. Copper will 
be a scarce metal in a few years. 

HERBERT C. HOOVER, IN HIS "PRINCIPLES OF MIN- 
ING," PAGE 38, SAYS: 

"In copper the demand is growing prodigiously. If the 
growth of demand continues through the next thirty years in 
the ratio of the past three decades, the annual demand for 
copper will be over 3,000,000 tons. Where such a stupendous 
amount of this metal is to come from is far beyond any appar- 
ent source of supply." 

Horace J. Stevens, the world's greatest authority on copper, 
predicts that in from two to four years there will be the greatest 
boom in copper that the world has ever seen. 

No promoters are handling this stock. Usually such a copper 
stock would cost at least $5.00 a share if promoters were hand- 
ling it. 

And mark this innovation : We do not intend to maintain ele- 
gant and expensive offices, pay extravagant commissions to 
agents, or pay big men for the use of their names on our Board 
of Directors. These are the causes of failure of more than half 
of the corporations that go to the wall. 

We will send you free a booklet called "Porphyry Coppers," 
which more fully describes these properties, if you will send 
us your name and address. Don't wait a week or a month be- 
fore you write for it, because only a few people can be ac- 
commodated with shares, as some large blocks are already 
spoken for. 



Address all communications to 



Kennett Consolidated Copper Companies 



924 Page Street, San Francisco, Cal 



July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



11 




Knicker — So Jones has a great invention. Bocker — Yes. 

An umbrella handle that retains the finger prints. — New York 
Sun. 

"A penny for your thoughts," chirped the young lady. 

"Well, I've had worse offers from publishers," responded the 
poet. — Kansas City Journal. 

Ward Heeler — You promised me a job. Mayor — Well, 

I told Commissioner Kelly to give you one. Ward Heeler — But 
the guy wanted to put me to work! — Life. 

Gibbs — One gets no diplomas in the School of Experi- 
ence. Dibbs — I don't know; the marriage certificate comes 
pretty near being one. — Boston Transcript. 

"I thought I would introduce a real cow into my comic 

opera." "How did it work?" "Didn't work at all. The milk- 
maids frightened the cow." — Louisville Courier-Journal. 

"Is Mrs. De Brick in?" asked the visitor, calling at the 

London home of the suffragette leader. "Yiss, mum," said 
Norah. "She's in for six months, mum." — Harper's Weekly. 

"Then the wedding was not altogether what you'd call 

a success?" "No; the groom's mother cried louder than the 
bride's mother. It was considered very bad form." — Courier- 
Journal. 

"Old Skads lost every cent he had in the world yester- 
day." "Gee! His heirs will be furious, I should think." "Oh, 
I don't think so." "How did he lose it?" "He died." — Hous- 
ton Post. 

Willie — Paw, what is the middle class? Paw — The 

middle class consists of people who are not poor enough to 
accept charity and not rich enough to donate anything. — Sacred 
Heart Review. 

"Father, our daughter is being courted by a poet." "Is 

that so, mother ? I'll kick him out." "Not so fast. Investigate 
first whether he writes for a magazine or for a breakfast food 
factory." — Washington Herald. 

"Grace, that waitress gives you all the best portions 

every time." "She is a college girl, earning some summer 
money." "But why should that make you so strong?" "Oh, 
we belong to the same sorority." — Exchange. 

"There is a great deal more refinement in athletics than 

there used to be." "Yes," replied the sporting man. "But 
every now and then some pugilist breaks loose and talks about 
'slugging over the ropes,' just like a political candidate." — 
Washington Star. 

The Passenger — Yes, I'm going out to kid that old rube 

uncle of mine for a couple of days. Do you know him? The 
Stage Driver — Yep. That was him who just whizzed by us in 
his new $5,000 car. Just got back from a three months' stay 
in New York. — Puck. 

"Allow me to congratulate you." "What for?" "Oh, for 

just anything — the sunshine, the blue skies, the fact that you 
are up and about. Isn't that something?" "No!" "Then con- 
gratulate me for not having a disposition like yours." — Bir- 
mingham Age-Herald. 

"Can you not wait on me immediately?" demanded the 

richly dressed woman; 'I'm in a great hurry." "Yes; let me 
have your prescription," said the busy druggist. "I have no 
prescription. I want you to look up a number for me in the 
telephone book." — Exchange. 

"How did that story pan out about the man in the Bronx 

who found the big hailstone on his back stoop this morning?" 
asked the city editor. "Nothing in it," replied the reporter. 
"He discovered that it wasn't a hailstone after all. The iceman 
left it there." — Woman's Home Companion. 



\ACATIONISTS. 
will find the Italian-Swiss Colony's choice wines at all the lead- 
ing hotels, summer resorts and restaurants in the State. Ask 
for TIPO (red or white.) 



The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 

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WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 Home C 6705 



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HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 
415-421 Bush St., San Francisco (Above Kearoy) Exchange, Doueias 2411 



New Music by Clever Musicians During Dinner at 
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Special 50c Luncheon Served in Ladies' Grill 
as well as Main Dining Hall 



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Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
Permanently Located 

Suite 607 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone Douglas 2608 



Murphy Grant & Company 

■Wholesale Dry Goods Furnishing Goods 

Notions 'White Goods Laces 

N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 



Brushes 



Back to our old location, 623 Sacramento Street, between 
Kearny and Montgomery streets. 



With full Hn Brooms ami Feather Luiptors. on band and 

a i.i kinds. Ladders. Burk- 

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write or telephone Kearny f>7S7. 

WM. BUCHANAN. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER. 



37-45 First Street, San Francisco. Phones: Sutter 2230; J 3221 

Private Exchange Connecting all Departments. 




PL/E/ASURE/S WAND 

"We obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Belasco manner. There are the regulation number of drop 
curtains before the play opens, which supply the necessary 
Belasco atmosphere and all the pretty light effects. In the 
production department nothing has been left undone, and the 
cast is unusually fine. Clare Blandick, who does the role of 
"The Butterfly," is a remarkably clever woman, and gives a 
performance of the character, viewed from a dramatic stand- 
point, better than the women whom I have seen in the operatic 
version. Her little vocal intonations are effective, and she has 
caught the spirit and manner of the character splendidly. She 
commands attention every moment she is on the stage, and she 
is hardly absent a moment. Somebody had remarkable judg- 
ment in selecting this lady for the role. It is a performance 
worthy in every essential. There is a supporting cast of eight 
or nine people, and every one is capable. Earl Ryder is par- 
ticularly good as the American Consul. The first offering 
of David Belasco for vaudeville purposes can be counted as 
a huge success. We are to see in two weeks the second con- 
tribution of David Belasco to vaudeville in the form of a dra- 
matic playlet entitled "The Drums of Oude." If he maintains 
the high standard he has set in "Madame Butterfly," we shall 
look forward with expectancy to anything he may see fit to 
offer us in tabloid form. 

George Evans, who is popularly known as "The Honey Boy," 



THEATRE TIPS. 

ALCAZAR. — "The Lion and the Mouse," a play of love and 
finance, is being well presented. 

COLUMBIA. — "Louisiana Lou," one of the best musical come- 
dies of the year. 

ORPHEUM.— "Madame Butterfly" is the headliner. One of 
the most pretentious offerings ever presented here. 

CORT. — African hunting scenes of a perilous trip well and 
clearly portrayed. 

PANT AGES. — Alick Lauder tops good bill at this place of 

amusement. 

EMPRESS.— Eight Saxones the best feature. 
* * » 

E&y Pari ©sirsoifo 

The Orpheum. 

There is plenty to amuse this week, and the bill throughout 
is high class and very entertaining. "The Five Original Piro- 
scoffis" are the first on the program. The quintette consists of 
three men and two women, who do some rather clever juggling, 
but their efforts seem rather tame after seeing the great work 
of Salerno, who was at the same theatre a couple of weeks ago. 
The Piroscoffis family are very entertaining, and do some 
things which are both new and novel. Scotch plays enacted by 
Scotch players were a tremendous success in 
New York last season, and this no doubt led to 
the idea of producing a Scotch play with Scotch 
actors in vaudeville. A company of five of them 
is this week at the Orpheum in a comedy entitled 
"The Concealed Bed." The little act serves well 
to show the cleverness of the actors, though the 
play itself is very weak and contains very little 
comedy, even from a Scotch view point. It is a 
pleasure to hear this delightful language spoken 
correctly by people who know how. The play and 
players are a pleasant diversion. If my memory 
serves me correctly, I am almost sure that I re- 
member Ray L. Royce as a Lyceum circuit per- 
former. After seeing him do his stunt at the Or- 
pheum this week strengthens this belief. Royce 
gives several eccentric characterizations, mostly 
of the rural type, donning only a wig and perhaps 
a mustache. His work is quiet and refined, and 
extremely clever. His lines are witty, and he 
manages to show his powers of transition in a 
marked manner. -His work as the country school 
principal is probably the best, and secures the 
most laughs. Royce is a welcome addition to 
vaudeville. We need more of his kind. 

Veronica Marquis and Laura O'Meers and 
Josie O'Meers do a triple act on the tight wire. 
They are three clever girls, and they work con- 
scientiously and with plenty of vim and zest. 
They have a very pleasing act, which serves ad- 
mirably. Brown and Blyer are two young men 
who sing and play the piano very well. One of 
them, I do not know which one, does the brunt of 
the entertaining by singing a number of songs in 
a rather original manner. The audience seems to 
like him, and their twenty minutes are reeled off 
in a pleasant manner. 

Quite the biggest production scenically which 
we have seen at the Orpheum is the production 
David Belasco sends us of the original dramatic 
version of "Madame Butterfly." It is the same 
clever little play which Belasco wrote years ago, 
and which Blanche Bates used as a curtain raiser 
for "Naughty Anthony." It seems strange now 
to see this charming little fantasy without its 
operatic dress. The musical accompaniment is 
the same which was originally written for the 
play by William Furst, and is merely incidental. 
Belasco has furnished a very elaborate produc- Paul J. Rainey's African Hunt. Scene from the great hunter's expedition, 
tion, and everything is done in the most approved which is being shown in Motion Pictures to capacity audiences at the Cort. 




July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



is about the funniest chap who has trod the Orpheum boards 
for a long time. He has the dryest and drollest method of mak- 
ing us laugh imaginable, and he is utterly unconventional in his 
manner. The best of it is that all his humor is entirely new 
and fresh, and a whole lot of it is local, and has not been 
adapted hastily to suit the needs of the town. This goes to 
exemplify that Evans is original and is a real humorist. He can 
say more funny things in the space of a minute than any come- 
dian that I can recall. The audience simply does not want 
to let him go, and Evans is obliged to make a speech and tell 
us that he cannot take up any more time. The Orpheum people 
should sign him up for the rest of his natural life. Honors and 
Le Prince, who are French pantomime gymnasts, close the pro- 
gram with an excellent exhibition of tumbling and acrobatic 
feats. They are a clever team, who work hard to please. The 
moving pictures this week are very good. 

* » * 
"Louisiana Lou" at the Columbia. 

This musical comedy is sent to us direct from the producing 
house, the La Salle Opera House of Chicago, where the enter- 
tainment had a run, I understand, of more than a year. If you 
are looking for something which is light and frothy, and which 
will pass a pleasant evening for you, then go and see "Louisi- 
ana Lou." Best of all, you will have a chance to welcome back 
our former fellow townsman, Barney Bernard, who, since his 
association with Kolb & Dill, in the old Fischer Theatre, has 
made his name well and favorably known in the East. His 
work in this play is along the lines of characters we saw him 
do years ago. Bernard has, without doubt, improved as an 
actor. He can hold the center of the stage now, and not feel 
embarrassed about it; in fact, he is the central figure in this 
play a good part of the evening, and his name is posted on the 
bill boards in bigger type than anybody else, and he can right 
now be called a near-star. I should like to see Bernard get 
away from the broad Jewish caricatures which he has been 
enacting all these years, and lend his fine ability to something 
which is really more worthy of him. He should pattern after 
David Warfield, who made his reputation on Broadway with 
Weber & Fields in similar characterizations. I do not go so 
far as to say that Bernard has the talent which Warfield pos- 
sesses, but he has many of the distinctive qualifications from 
an acting standpoint which I have noted in Warfield. Bernard 
is simply brimming over with ability, and I trust that in the 
near future some astute and discerning manager will have a 
play written for our friend Barney which will bring out his 
true ability, and give everybody an opportunity to see the real 
stuff there is in him. In "Louisiana Lou" he does all that can 
be asked of him. He even sings a couple of songs, and he pos- 
sesses a very good baritone voice which he uses discreetly. 
Barney never attempted to vocalize in the old days, and can- 
didly I believe that he was afraid that the public would not 
take his attempts seriously. More experience and more con- 
fidence, added to a large measure of success, has emboldened 
Barney to do these things. Candidly, I should hate to think 
what would become of "Louisiana Lou" without Barney. Most 
of the fun centers about him, and he monopolizes about all the 
funny lines the play contains. 

The libretto is somewhat disappointing and rather thin, but 
we have come to expect these things in musical comedy. The 
music is by Ben Jerome, who has written and composed some 
very clever affairs during the past few years. On the whole, 
the music is uniformly diverting, one number in particular be- 
ing whistly and tuneful, and Barney has a song which is de- 
lightfully musical, though the words are poor. A capable com- 
pany is provided. 

Helena Salinger is here again, and she seems to grow more 
buxom every time we see her. At all events her added avoir- 
dupois is not at all embarrassing; in fact, it seems to add, if 
anything, to her beaming personality. What she has to do in 
the play she does in a very conscientious manner. Sophie 
Tucker, who made her name in vaudeville for years as a coon 
shouter, has turned to musical comedy, and is assigned a very 
important role in the play. She renders a couple of her coon 
shouting songs in the most approved manner, and she aids 
materially in the fun of the evening. I would call her debut in 
this form of entertainment a success. I understand that it is 
her aim to devote herself to this kind of work hereafter, and 
there is no reason why she should not make a success of it. She 



is a natural comedienne, and seems made to order for this sort 
of thing. Harry Hanlon, who has been here before on several 
occasions, is provided with a good part, which he takes care of 
with his accustomed skill. Bessie De Voie is the soubrette of 
the company. She is a capable dancer, but that is about all. 
She cannot sing, and she is a mediocre actress. She makes 
brave attempts, however, to do well. Eleanor Henry is a cap- 
able girl, and she is easily the best vocalist in the company. 
Mortimer Weldon is an unusually clever juvenile man. He is 
good looking and can dance, and he is, moreover, a very good 
actor. 

There are a number of other characters in good hands. I 
wish the stage manager of the company would take note of a 
big, tall, raw-boned fellow in the chorus, who appears to be 
especially clever. He has a big, fine baritone voice which 
could be heard all over the theatre, and he certainly can dance. 
Many clever people have graduated from choruses. The cos- 
tumes are fresh and very pretty, and the girls are supplied 
with enough scantiness of wardrobe to suit the most fastidious 
bald-headed men who ever occupied front rows at a musical 
comedy show. The two scenes are very pretty. 

* * » 

"Lion and the Mouse" at the Alcazar. 

Richard Bennett and Mabel Morrison have outclassed the 
three previous productions of this play at the Alcazar. The 
two principals win full favor. The heroine of the play, Shir- 
ley Rossmore, is a young woman who fights and conquers John 
Burkett Ryder, a financier of strong character and indomitable 
will — a human dynamo — and her only weapons are brains and 




May Tullv. who will appear in the Reno, Nevada, divorce 
sketch, "The Battle Cry of Freedom" this Sunday matinee at 
the Orpheum. 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 



moral courage. She is in Europe when her father, a jurist, 
is reduced to penury through Ryder's machinations, and aboard 
the steamship that conveys her back to New York she meets 
and wins the love of his son, Jefferson, a young fellow with 
high ideals. Confronted with the necessity of earning her 
bread, she takes up literary work, and under the nom de plume 
of Sarah Green, writes a book entitled "The Great American 
Octopus," the central figure in which bears such a striking 
resemblance to the elder Ryder that he invites her to visit 
him at his home. There she impresses him so favorably that, 
unaware of her identity, he engages her to be his amanuensis, 
tells her of his son's infatuation for "that Rossmore girl," and 
urges her to "save the boy" by marrying him herself. 

In the big scene of the play Shirley tells Ryder who she is, 
and scathingly denounces his method of enriching himself by 
impoverishing others. Throughout the four acts there are 
stirring scenes between father and son, the young fellow con- 
demning the means by which the family wealth was obtained, 
and the sire defending his money-getting policy, with the girl 
in the confidence of both. Of course the mouse finally subdues 
the lion, and all ends happily. 

Full praise must be given to all the members of the company 
for excellent work. 



New Motion Pictures at the Cort. 

That the motion pictures of the Paul J. Rainey African Hunt 
have lived up to their advance heraldry is being evidenced by 
the capacity houses which have been the rule at the Cort Thea- 
tre ever since last Sunday, when the films were first exhibited 
to a San Francisco audience. They are without doubt the 
"most marvelous motion pictures ever taken." 

These films really represent an expenditure of a quarter of 
a million dollars, as well as years of effort and research. An 
expedition of 350 men, under the direction of Mr. Rainey, 
spent a year in the wilds of Africa, and braved death from 
fever and wild beasts in order that science might be enriched. 
Mr. Rainey, who is a millionaire sportsman of Cleveland, Ohio, 
undertook his first African big game hunt purely from the point 
of sport, but he eventually came to hunt for the camera, and 
not for fun. 

Through the medium of the moving picture camera, the last 
expedition of this noted hunter to the Black Continent is made 
to live again. The wilds are visualized. The lion, the 
rhinoceros, the giraffe, the tiger, the cheetah, are seen in their 
natural haunts. The eye of the camera has caught them as they 
naturally are. They are certainly not conscious of the fact that 
they were unconsciously posing for a moving picture film. An 
illuminative lecture is given which adds much to the entertain- 
ment. 

* * * 

A lick Lauder at Pantages. 

The diversified bill at the Pantages Theatre is serving to 
crowd the popular vaudeville house to the doors these after- 
noons and evenings, the list of entertainers including such 
celebrities as Alick Lauder, who is as thoroughly Scotch and as 
droll as his brother, Harry; Signor G. Frizzo, Italy's famous 
change artist, who gives an entire theatrical entertainment by 
himself; Henri Kubelik, an interesting Hungarian violinist; the 
Marmeen Four, in a cheerful musical oddity; the Lessos, very 
clever jugglers, and other interesting acts, including some acro- 
batic and acting dogs. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Alcazar. — Bessie Barriscale's engagement at the Alcazar, 
commencing next Monday night and continuing two weeks, 
promises to be the most profitable venture undertaken in the 
O'Farrell street home of drama, for the advance demand for 
seats is unprecedentedly strong. While this is sterling proof 
of Miss Barriscale's artistic worth and personal popularity, 
the fame of her opening vehicle, "The Rose of the Rancho," 
must also be given some of the credit. Indeed, the local repu- 
tation of the actress and the play are to some extent inter- 
dependent, as she is the only person who has interpreted the 
title role in San Francisco. Her first appearance under Belasco 
& Mayer's management was as Juanita, and the hit she scored 
was responsible for her retention as the Alcazar's ingenue 
throughout three seasons. Since then she ascended to stardom, 



being engaged to lead in a high-priced production next Sep- 
tember on Broadway, New York. 

"The Rose of the Rancho" will be presented during one week 
only, as "Smith," an English comedy in which Miss Barriscale 
made her greatest recent success, is to be the medium of her 

farewell appearances. 

* * * 

Columbia. — "Louisiana Lou" will begin its third and last 
week Sunday night, July 14th. 

James K. Hackett and the splendid organization which will 
assist him in the presentation of his plays at the Columbia 
Theatre, when this noted star appears in San Francisco, left 
New York on Friday, July 12th, for this city. The company 
will arrive on Wednesday preceding the opening date of Mon- 
day night, Juiy 21st, and during this time will make complete 
preparations for the inaugural of Mr. Hackett's noteworthy 
season. Of special interest to the theatregoers of San Fran- 
cisco is the publication of the list of associate players coming 
here with Mr. Hackett. Included in the cast are many such 
great local favorites as E. M. Holland, Mrs. Thomas Whiffen, 
Frazer Coulter, Frank Burbeck, Eva Vincent, Vaughn Trevor, 

Luke Martin, Beatrice Beckley and Olive Oliver. 

* * * 

Corf. — Sunday night, July 21st, will mark the opening of the 
great Gilbert & Sullivan comic opera revival at the Cort. The 
original New York Casino star cast, which has been interpret- 
ing the masterpieces, will come to San Francisco direct from 
New York by special train. It is particularly noteworthy that 
San Francisco is the only city in Northern California that will 
be played by this organization. "The Mikado" will start the 
merry season on its way, and during the four weeks' period, 
"Pinafore," "Patience" and "The Pirates of Penzance" will be 

given. 

* * * 

Pantages. — On Sunday there will be the usual complete 
change of program, and as a distinct novelty, the moving pic- 
tures, in their entirety, of the Wolgast-Rivers struggle for the 
light-weight supremacy on the Fourth of July will be shown 
for the first time in this city. The vaudeville portion of the 
entertainment will be up to the usual high class standard, "A 
Night in the Edelweiss," a miniature musical comedy presented 
by Howland, Lane and their company of ten musical come- 
dians, heading the attractions. Carl Rosine, a renowned Euro- 
pean magician, assisted by Marguerite Rosine, will present a 
mysterious act in a special setting of scenery, and the Romano 
brothers, exponents of physical culture and Grecian art, will 
offer a posing exhibition, the men made up to represent marble 
statues. Doesch and Zilbauer, Viennese street musicians, will 
offer a novel musical specialty, and Bond Morse, known as "the 
man from nowhere," will appear in a tramp monologue. Clark 
and Verdi, the very original Italian comedians, who made such 
a hit here the early part of the year, will return in their original 

act. 

* * * 

Orpheum. — "The Battle Cry of Freedom," a breezy come- 
dietta which is a satire on Reno, Nevada, divorces, will be 
presented next week at the Orpheum by May Tully, who will 



SWEATER COATS— 

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Women's Coils 

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Girls Coals 

Hen's Ruff Necks 



GANTNER & 
MATTERN CO. 

GRANT AVENUE AT POST ST. 



July 13. 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



IS 



be most pleasantly recalled for her sketch, "Stop, Look and 
Listen." The piece is written by Miss Tully and Bozeman 
Bulger, the well known sporting writer and co-author oi 
"Curves," the baseball skit. 

The Kaufman Brothers, Jack and Phil, will amuse with their 
tuneful originalities. 

Harry Atkinson, the Australian Orpheus, will present his 
monologue of nursery rhymes and his imitations of musical 
instruments. He imitates the mandolin, musette, cornet, banjo, 
harp, violin, bagpipes, penny trumpet and other instruments 
too numerous to mention. 

The act to be presented by Mr. and Mrs. Elliott next week is 
decidedly out of the ordinary. These two gifted artists are 
virtuosi on that most difficult instrument, the harp, on which 
they play everything from grand opera to ragtime. 

Next week will conclude the engagements of Ray L. Royce 
in his eccentric character impersonations; the O'Meers Sisters 
& Company, and Honors and Le Prince. It will also be the last 
of David Belasco's superb production of "Madame Butterfly," 
which is creating the greatest theatrical sensation this city has 
known in quite a while. 

• * * 

Press Woodruff and Cyrus Brownlee Newton, the Apostles of 
Mirth and Banishers of Sadness, have completed arrangements 
for a trans-continental tour in harmonious combination. These 
gentlemen are favorites in San Francisco, and are clever enter- 
tainers. Their scintillating bursts of genuine humor entitle 
them to a front seat on the rostrum of American fun-makers. 
This combination is a team of men such as has not toured the 
country since the days of Twain and Cable, and it is distinctly 
different from all of its predecessors in the galaxy of the world 
of humor. Many famous humorists, including Jerome K. 
Jerome, "Bill" Nye and Battell Loomis scarcely reached the 
versatility of this duo. Press Woodruff and Cyrus Brownlee 
Newton, on a tour, transcendental in interest. It is the product 
of the present cycle. Humor and Art have perished, and these 
two have reincarnated the sisters, have brought to light again 
the twin mirth virgins of the heart and mind, clean of thought 
and limb, honest of purpose, and as purposeful as they are 
honest. Laugh and the world is a-grin, and the witticisms of 
Press Woodruff are with you ever and a day. The play of emo- 
tions over the face of that other star, Cyrus Brownlee Newton, 
and, in his impersonations, there lives again the elder Booth, 
Henry Irving and a score of the actors of yester-year. The 
fun makers of other times are mimicked and pictured by New- 
ton, and Woodruff lends no little, as a foil, to a well chosen 
stage mate. To make the world merry, to make men and wo- 
men better by and through wholesome mirth, that is the task 
of these missionaries of fun. After their American tour, Wood- 
ruff and Newton are booked for the Orient. 

• * * 

The "Kruger Club," an organization of talented musicians, 
made its initial salaam Saturday evening at the Fairmont 
Hotel. Judging by the enthusiastic audience, the club has come 
to stay. Each number on its program was given musicianly 
treatment, showing excellent instruction and a remarkably clear 
understanding of the composer's conception. The names of 
Liszt, Chopin, Mozkowsky and Saint-Saens are not treated 
lightly by musicians, as their compositions demand study, work 
and temperament, all three of which came to the front Saturday 

evening. 

• * • 

After more than a season's run at Wallack's Theatre, N. Y., 
"Pomander Walk" will come to the Columbia Theatre a few 
weeks hence. This is the Louis N. Parker comedy of happiness 
which has met with one of the greatest metropolitan successes 
in recent years. There is no star part in the play, and the lead- 
ing roles are of about equal importance. The players who were 
originally selected by the Leibler Company to enact this de- 
lightful play will all appear during the local engagement. 

• * * 

Charming Mrs. Whiffen returns here with James K. Hackett 
after an absence of several seasons. Another notable with the 
company is E. H. Holland, and still another is Frazer Coulter. 



"Hey, you Rube, what's the quickest way out of this 

hole?" "Just touch a match to your gasoline tank." — Harper's 
Weekly. 



Parson Johnson — Bredren, dis new attachment on de left 

ob de pulpit am an automobile horn. It am guaranteed to wake 
a somnolent brudder in one-fifth ob a second. Deacon Spara- 
gus will pass de contribution box, while de choir sings "Wake, 
Sinners, Wake!" — Judge. 



The Cannibal King — See here, what was that dish you 

served up to me at lunch ? The Cook — Stewed motorist, your 
majesty. The Cannibal King — It tasted very burnt. The Cook 
— Well, he was scorching when we caught him, your majesty. 
— Sketch. 



Murphy — Oi want to get a fust-class autymobile for me 

wife. Auto Dealer — Long body. Murphy — None of your 
business! She's built like a barrel, but Oi didn't come here to 
discuss her shape wid ye. — Exchange. 



■ A curious thing about automobiles is that whenever one 

of them turns turtle a chorus girl or two are likely to be found 
under it. — Exchange. 



Cort Theatre 



Leading attractions only. 
Ellis and Market streets. 
Phone— Sutter 2460. 



YOU'LL, HAVE TO HURRY. Second and last big week starts to- 
morrow. Mat. Daily at 2:30. Every night at 8:30. 

PAUL J. RAINEY'S AFRICAN HUNT. 

The most marvelous motion pictures ever taken. Interesting lec- 
ture. Prices — 25c. and 50c 

Sunday, July 21st — New York Casino star cast in revivals of Gilbert 
& Sullivan comic operas. 



Pantages' Theatre 



Market street, opposite Mason. 



Week of Sunday. July 11th. 

MIRTH, DANCE AND MELODY! 
"A NIGHT AT THE EDELWEISS," with 10 Musical Comedians; 
CARL ROSINE & CO., in Mystery and Magic; ROMANO 
BROTHERS, Physical Culture and Grecian Art; DOLESCH and 
ZILLBAT'ER, Viennese Street Musicians; CLARK and VERDI, 
Italian Comedians; BOND MORSE, "The Man from Nowhere," and 

WOLGAST-RIVERS MOVING PICTURES. 
Mat. Daily at 2:30. Nights. 7:15 and 0:15. Sunday and Holidays, 
Mats, at 1:30 and 3:30; Nights, continuous from 0:30. Prices — 10c 
20c, 30c. 



Orph 



eiLTYl, OFarrell Stre.t. 
K/1A/IIV Bet Stockton and Powell. 

Safest and most magnificent theatre In America. 

beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

THE HIGHEST STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE. 

"Till] BATTLE CRY OP FREEDOM," a One-acl comedy of Divorce 

Life in Reno, Nev.. introducing MAY TULLY :md her company; 

MAX BROTHERS in Tuneful Originalities; HARRY AT- 
KINSON, the Australian Orpheus; MR. and MRS. ELLIOTT, Harp- 
ists and Singers; RAY L. ROYCE; O'MEERS SISTERS & CO.; 
HONORS .4 LE PRINCE; NEW DAYLIGHT MOTION PICTURES. 
Last week — Immense success of DAVID BELASCO'S superb pro- 
duction of "MADAME BUTTERFLY." 

Bvenlng prices — 10c. 25c, 50c, 75c. Box seats. $1. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays), 10c. 25c, 50c. Phones Douglas 70; 
Home C 1570. 



Columbia Theatre 

Qottlob. Marx 4 Co.. Managers. 



Comer Geary and Mason Its. 
Phones Franklin 110. 
Home C 1711 



Beginning Sunday night. July 14th. Third and last week. Matinees 
rdays. The La Salle Theatre, Chicago, Musi- 
• rnedy Triumph. 

"LOUISIANA LOU." 

With BARNEY" BERNARD, SOPHIE TUCKER, and many others. 
Bargain matinees Wednesday. Prices. 25c and $1. Evenings and 

-2& to $1.50. 

Monday,' Julv 21st— JAMES K. HACKETT and his Criterion Thea- 
tre. X. Y.. Company In "The Grain of Dust." 



« 1 rrfl i O'Farrell Street. 

Alcazar Iheatre s&sr&sitfs, 



Belasco * Mayer. Owners and Managers. 



Home C till. 



Mondav evening. July 15th, and throughout the week. BESSIE 
BARRISCALE. assisted by the Alcazar Company, in David Be- 
nd Richard Walton Tully's famous play of early California, 

THE ROSE OF THE RANCHO. 

A magnificent pictorial production. 
Prices — Night. 25c to $1. Matinee, 25c. to 50c. 
rhuraday, Saturday. Sunday. 



NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP. 
Notice is herebv given that the partnership heretofore existing between 
I *H BII L and B I. F.ILL, under the firm name of L. H. & B. I. BILL, 
doing business at No. 543 Golden Gate Avenue. San Francisco. California, 
Is dissolved by mutual consent. L. H. Bill retiring from said bu 
B. I. Bill will continue said business, and pay and collect all Indebtedness 
due by or to said Arm. BILL 

.Seal) a L bill: 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 








rXIETX 




Interest in the marriage of Miss Jennie Crocker and Malcolm 
Whitman dominates the imagination of society, and the fact 
that so many New Yorkers are out here for the wedding is an 
added spur to expectation. Whitman will be supported by his 
closest friends, who are expected to arrive from New York this 
week, and the presence of four stalwart, good looking, eligible 
young chaps, v ith the New York label, naturally stirs the fancy 
of the girls who all have a child-like faith in the presence of 
fairies at weddings, and a secret belief that all the good luck 
tokens and the omens of the ring and the thimble, and the 
money and the boquet, are not pretty superstitious make-be- 
lieves, but really-truly messages from the fairies. Naturally, 
the presence of eligible material makes the situation all wool 
and a yard wide, whether the Republicans or the Democrats 
stand for a reduction of the tariff! 

Already a force of detectives is on guard over the wedding 
gifts received by Miss Crocker. Having lost a pearl necklace 
and having been the victim of more absurd stories and highly 
colored yarns in connection with that collection of pearls, the 
prospective bride is naturally anxious to avoid a repetition of 
notoriety as well as to save her wedding gifts. The divers after 
the lost necklace represented all classes and kinds of men who, 
after a little deep-sea thinking, brought up a cargo of theory 
which made excess baggage for the newspapers for many a 
day, made Miss Crocker uncomfortable, and did not project the 
pearls from the limbo of the somewhere land into which they 
disappeared. It is the imperative business of a squad of plain 
clothes men to guard the Crocker estate these days, and no one 
is allowed to enter the grounds who arouses suspicion in the 
watchful pickets. They are to remain on guard until after the 
wedding, so that the guests will have the comforting assurance 
that everything has been done to discourage a Raffles from rich 
pickings. Under these circumstances, it is not improbable that 
some of the guests will journey to the safe deposit and bring 
out their genuine jewels, instead of bedecking themselves with 
the spurious but convincing ones which they usually wear. 

The Whitelaw Reids have presented Miss Crocker with a dia- 
mond and pearl tiara. It is difficult to visualize the little 
heiress in regal head-dress, but of course no perfectly good col- 
lection of wedding presents is complete in London without 
a ta-ra-ra, and the Reids have become sufficiently Anglicized to 
make that the supreme test of their generosity and affection, 
and Jennie Crocker is like a daughter o' their hearts, so she 
gets the tiara. There is a flattering amount of interest in Lon- 
don over this marriage. Miss Crocker has visited there once 
or twice every year, and one society journal has the following 
paragraph: "The young California heiress, Miss Crocker, has 
chosen for her husband Malcolm Whitman, who was formerly 
best known as an American tennis player, but hereafter he must 
be distinguished for his prowess and skill in winning Miss 
Crocker. Many young Englishmen of parts have entered the 
lists at one time or another, but this Californienne lacks the 
eager love of the game which distinguishes most of her country- 
women, whether their intentions are serious or not. Miss 
Crocker yawns in a young man's face during the first lap, and 
no beef-fed man can stand up to such ignominious treatment, 
so they withdrew from the Marathon." 

Miss Crocker has confided that foreigners "make me tired," 
and evidently she meant it literally, and yawned in the faces 
of the English suitors. 

© © © 

Any actress who has followed the career of Miss Crocker 
must feel that it is manifestly unfair that to He who Hath shall 
be Given so much that would be far more useful to an actress, 
and would make an actorine. First there was the pearl neck- 
lace. To be sure the loss of jewels is not usually considered 
modern realism for a reputable press agent these incredulous 
days, but there were qualifying and convincing chapters in the 
story of the loss of this particular necklace that, had it belonged 



PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street in the center of the city. 
Take any Market Street Car' from the Ferry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The most beautifully situated of any City Hotel 
in the world. 

Take the Sacramento Street Cars from the Ferry 
Two Great Hotels Under the Management of the 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



to an actress, say Ethel Barrymore, who would have been 
invited to that ball had she been here, would have left very 
little room in the newspapers for the mention of any of the 
other Frohman stars. 

Consider the case of the unfortunate youth whose hallucina- 
tion is that he has won the affections of the young mistress for 
whom he worked in a menial capacity. His aberration caused 
some fear that he might inflict harm on her, and he was ap- 
prehended, his sanity examined into, and he will be cared for 
out of reach of the object of his affections, so that there is no 
danger that his vagaries in this matter will spell harm for her. 
Fancy what material this would make for the overworked press 
agent of almost any actress! To be sure, the public would be 
inclined to fancy that some poor "supe" had been hired to play 
the part of the crazed victim of a hapless infatuation, but never- 
theless they would read all about it, and while it lasted, the 
star would be the only luminary in the profession. 

© © © 

While we are starring, here is some interesting news about 
the marriage of Richard Harding Davis, who writes "best 
sellers" apparently by a simple turn of the wrist, and Bessie 
McCoy, the popular "Yama-Yama" girl of stagedom, who 
achieved fame apparently by a simple turn of the foot, which 
in the name of truth it must be added, is not so simple a turn as 
it looks, for not only is the foot unusually well turned, but all 
that precedes the extremities is turned with equal nicety and a 
great deal of it shows in the production ! 

My friend, who was ac the wedding, writes that the bride was 
simply bewitching, and no one wondered that "Dick" lost his 
head over her. Ethel Barrymore Colt was matron of honor, 
and s-sh! while I tell you something: she looks more matronly 
than ever. Gone, gene is the slender, supple Ethel, with the 
stooping shoulders which every boarding school girl copied, 
and in its place is an actress — and a mother. Indeed, Ethel 
plays the mother all the time that she is off the stage, and at the 
wedding breakfast she cooed so continuously about the babies, 
and went into such details about how the new baby enjoys the 
spoonful of orange juice which the specialist prescribed that 
Russell Colt finally said "Forget it!" which familiar repri- 
mand won loud applause from every one, and the doting mother 
meekly took her cue, which shows that Colt knows his place, 
and is an unabashed husband in spite of the temperamental at- 
tempt his wile made last year to ioosen the matrimonial bonds. 
© © © 

The other day Mrs. H. Perkins, of Planada, Cal., wrote her- 
self down on a hotel register as "Mrs. H. Perkins and husband," 
and of course got written up the next day in all the San Fran- 
cisco papers. One of the women delegates to the recent bien- 
nial convention had a brave and gallant husband peopling the 
background, and she also registered him at the Palace as "and 
husband." 

Who are these people gesticulating and shouting? The re- 
frain of the babel is : "We told you so — we knew what suffrage 
would do!" 

Nay. The ladies who registered their "and husbands" did 
not pen themselves and their husband-escorts thus in the first 
flush of a suffrage victory. It must be remembered that the 
steam roller went over the suffrage plank in the convention, 
and splintered it to bits, so the delegated clubwomen who un- 
protestingly watched the demolition of the plank cannot be 
dubbed suffragists first, last and always above all of us. 
Therefore it is not fair to blame (or to praise?) suffrage if a 
clubwoman makes her stub pen produce "and husband" after 



July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



her own name. The reason why she should prefer to register 
in this way is not very clear to a clever woman who keeps hi.r 
other half in the "and husband" state without letting him ever 
surmise that she has accomplished that feat. No woman with 
any subtlety would ever thus show her hand on a hotel register. 

Moreover, the modern man does not "and wife" the fair being 
whom he has promised to love, honor and protect, though cooks 
may come and cooks may go. It is "Mr. and Mrs. William 
Tevis" on the St. Francis Hotel register, not "William Tevis 
and wife." Possibly even this change is an unconscious tribute 
to the "woman movement," and it would seem that woman 
might at least begin where man is leaving off, and instead of 
registering as "Mrs. John Smith and husband," why not regis- 
ter as "Mrs. and Mr. John Smith?" 
© © © 

The engagement of Miss Abby Parrott and Edward Tobin 
did not inspire society with the necessity of simulating sur- 
prise. Last summer when the young people showed a marked 
preference for each other's society, their friends were too well 
bred to make them uncomfortable by asking for blue print 
plans of their future, yet every one surmised just what the out- 
come would be. Therefore the news was received without a 
gasp of astonishment and with a great deal of pleasure, as the 
union will cement the friendship of two of the families that 
have made much of the social and financial history of San 
Francisco. The Parrott branch of the clan to which Miss Abby 
belongs is now abroad, but she has spent a great deal of time 
out here with her grandmother, whose namesake she is. When 
Mrs. Parrott saw that granddaughter and young Tobin were 
serious, she packed her off to Europe. She thoroughly approved 
of the match, herself, but being a wise and astute old lady, she 
didn't want to take any responsibility which might just as well 
be evaded, so Tobin had to cross the Atlantic and ask per- 
mission first hand. Plans for the wedding are still nebulous, 
and at this writing the favored idea is to have the ceremony in 
England, and the young couple will then honey-moon in 
leisurely fashion back to California, where they will make 
their home. With the French and English connections of the 
Parrotts', it' has always been considered unlikely that the girls 
would marry out here, and Miss Abby's selection of a future 
husband and home brings great joy to the hearts of her friends, 
who find her great fun and a worth-while addition to the set 
of young matrons has been assured by Tobin's winning the 
hand of Miss Parrott. 

© © © 

The home-coming of Mrs. George Cameron brought joy to 
the de Young friends, for she has the assurance of the most 
noted European physicians that her mother's health will be re- 
stored after an operation, which is not considered very serious. 
Mrs. de Young was stricken while abroad, and her daughter, 
who had not accompanied her hastened over to her. The Joseph 
Tobins are still in Germany with the family. The Camerons 
will occupy the Walter Martin home pending the building of a 
home of their own in the Hillsborough district. 



Captain Joe Fowler, now dead, was a famous Southern 

steamboat man of the old days. One morning after he had 
reached the age of retirement he was sitting on the wharf 
of a Tennessee River town when a boat landed, and a Northern 
woman came ashore, carrying in her arms the first Mexican 
hairless dog that Captain Joe had ever seen. As the lady ap- 
proached him he rose and made a low bow. "I beg your par- 
don, madam " he said, "but is this your dog?" "It is," she said. 
"Is that the only dog you've got?" "It is." "Madam," said 
Captain Joe, "ain't you mighty near out of dog?" — Saturday 
Evening Post. 



"Dad," said a Bartlesville, Okla., kid to his father the 

other night, "I want to go to the show to-night." "A show at 
night is no place for a kid like you. You should be at home in 
bed." "But I peddled bills and have two tickets," said the kid, 
as he began to sniffle. "Alright, then," answered dad. "I'll go 
with you to see that you don't get into trouble." — Kansas City 
Star. 



Candy for Her Vacation. — It will add to the pleasure of her 
stay in the country. Can be sent by express from any one of 
Geo. Haas & Sons' four candy stores. 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Turkish Baths 
12th Floor 

Ladies' Hair Dressing Parlors 

2d Floor 

Cafe 

White and Gold Restaurant 

Lobby Floor 

Electric Qrill 
Barber Shop 
Basement, deary Street Entrance 



Under the management of James Woods 



HOTEL SUTTER 



Cor. Sutter and Kearny 



San Francisco 



In the center of retail and wholesale shopping 

district. 
New. modern, up-to-date and flre-proof. 
280 rooms— single or en suite. Rates SI. 60 

per day and upwards. 
Take any taxicab from Ferry or Railway 

depots at expense of the hotel. 
Cater to patrons of the famous Occidental 

and Lick Hotels of ante- 1906 days. 



Excellent Cafe in connection Merchants Lunch 50c 

Table d'Hote Dinner with Wine $1.00 



HOTEL MONTGOMERY 

San Jose's Newest Hotel 

Fireproof European Plan 

Rates $1.00 and up 

T. J. McHENRY, Manager 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

DEL MONTE 

PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL 

PACIFIC GROVE 

Arrange to spend your summer months on the Monterey Peninsula. 
No spot in California offers so much as does Del Monte, Monterey and 
Pacific Grove, with Its beautiful mountain scenery, drives, and par- 
ticularly the unexcelled grassy course of the 

Del Monte Golf & Country Club 

Both hotels under the same management. 
Write for rates, literature, etc., to 

H. R. WARNER, Del Monte, California 



STEVENS 
DURYEA 



For supreme satisfaction In tour- 
ing: the STEVENS-DURYEA SIX. 
With Its "unit power plant" 
mounted on "three points," it has 
the maximum of power efficiency, 
the minimum of friction and strain, 
and a motor flexibility that Is 
truly delightful. 



"SIX" PACIFIC MOTOR CAR 
CO., Distributors 
Golden Gate Avenue at Polk Street 
San Francisco, Cal. 









Announcement* suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
bution! must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear In the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 

HALL-NICKERSON.— The engagement is announced of Miss Marian 
Hall, granddaughter of Mrs. Margaret Mee, of San Rafael, and Fred- 
erick Nickerson. No plans have been made for the wedding. 

PARROTT-TOBIN. — The engagement has just been announced in Paris 
of Miss Abby Parrott and Edward J. Tobln. The bride-elect is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Parrott of Baywood, San Mateo 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
AUNE- PARTINGTON. — Miss Ii.ger Aune and Jack Allan Partington were 

married Wednesday evening at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. 

and Mrs. Pedar Aune, in Waller street. 
LANGHORNL-PARKER.— The marriage of Miss Julia Langhorne and 

Lieutenant James Parker, U. S\ N.. will take place early in September, 

and will be an elaborate church affair. The ceremony will be per- 
formed at St. Luke's Church. 
LEVINSON-REARDON.— The marriage of Aileen Levinson and Dr. 

Frank Reardon is set for August loth. 11 will take place at the home 

of Miss Levinson's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Levinson in Pierce 

street. 
LOWE-WOLLMAN.-Mr and Mrs. Arthur Lowe have issued cards for 

the marriage of their daughter, Miss Edith, to Mr. Hans Wollman. 

The ceremony will take place on July 20th, at Christ Church, Sau- 

salilo. 
WHiTTLE-SYMMES— The wedding of Leslie Webb Symmos and Miss 

Grace Whittle of Mill Valley will take place in August at the Whittle 

home. 

LUNCHEONS. 
BOTHIN. — Mrs. Henry Bothin gave one of the handsomest luncheons 

of the summer recently, entertaining in honor of Miss Marian Miller. 
J3REUNER. — Mr. and Mrs. John Breuner entertained friends Informally 

at a luncheon party at the Hotel St. Francis recently. 
HUETER. — Mrs. Ernest Huc-ter entertained at a luncheon at her home in 

Mill Valley Friday afternoon, when the complimented guest was Miss 

Olga Jungblut, fiancee of J. I. Broughton. 
MCALLISTER. — Miss Ethel McAllister entertained at a luncheon recently 

in honor of Mrs. Ernest Stillman. 
MEYER. — The Misses Olga and Alice Meyer entertained recently at an 

elaborate luncheon in their attractive Menlo Park home, the honored 

guest having been Mrs. Frank Somers. 
MOORE. — Mr. and Mrs. George Moore were hosts at a luncheon recently 

for Miss Miller and Bernard Ford, whose marriage will take place in 

September. 

TEAS. 
AMES.— Mrs. Joseph Ames will preside over a tea to be given at the Pal- 
ace Hotel on the afternoon of July 20th. 
SEARLE. — Mrs. James Searle was hostess at an informal tea last Sunday 

afternoon in her Alameda home, entertaining in honor of her daughter, 

Mrs. George Hays Laird. 
STEWART. — Mrs. Charles Stewart was hostess at a unique tea given re- 
cently in compliment to Mrs. A. McDermott of Washington, D. C. The 

tea was a Chinese affair, and the table decorations were Oriental. 
TOJETTI. — Mme. Emilia Tojetti was hostess at a pretty tea at the Palace 

recently. Mrs. A. H. Boomer was the guest of honor, and about a 

dozen friends were invited to meet her. 

DINNERS. 

BRIGG. — Mrs. Wallace W. Brigg opened her Piedmont home Wedneadas 

evening for a dinner in compliment to Mrs. Minon T raver of New- 
York, who is spending part of the midseason as the house guest of 
Mrs. Frederick Marriott. Mrs. Traver has won recognition on the 
Atlantic Coast with her pen, and has been welcomed here by the 
literary colony. Following the dinner, an Informal dance was en- 
joyed by the guests. 

CROCKER. — Mr. and Mrs. Templeton Crocker gave a dinner recently In 
honor of Mr. Malcolm Whitman and Miss Jennie Crocker. Later all 
attended the dance at the Buriingame Club. 

HELMUTH.— Mrs. William Todd Helmuth, one of the delegates from 
New York, was hostess at a handsomely appointed dinner at the 
Palace recently, at which she entertained the State Presidents of the 
various federations. 

JONES. — Miss Elizabeth Jones was hostess at one of the recent dinner 
parties given at her home in Washington street. 

KEHRLEIN. — Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Kehiiein were dinner hosts re- 
cently, entertaining in their Los Altos home. 

KIRWIN.— Captain A. R, Kirwin, U S. A., and Mrs. Klrwin entertained at 
a dinner party recently in compliment to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stew- 
art at the Presidio. 

MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin entertained at a dinner Monday night In 
honor of Mr. and Mrs. Whitman, of Brook line, Mass., the parents of 
Malcolm Whitman, the fiance of Miss Jennie Crocker. 

MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin gave a large dinner recently at her home 
on Broadway, in honor of the Baroness von Suttner. 



CARDS. 

AMES.— Miss Margaret Ames, daughter of Dr. Ames, U. S. N., has sent out 
cards for a bridge party to be given Tuesday, July 16th, at Yerba 
Buena Island. 

CHAMBERS. — Mrs. William Chambers entertained at a charming bridge- 
tea recently In her attractive quarters at the Presidio. 

PARTRIDGE. — Miss Elyse Parti idge entertained at a bridge party recently 
at her home in California street, The complimented guest of the 
affair was Miss Edith Lowe, of Sausalito. 

HOUSE PARTIES. 

McCUTCHEON. — Mrs. Edward MeCutcheon entertained a week-end house 
party at Gaston recently. 

PORTER. — Mrs. Florence Porter Prlngst was hostess at a large house 
party over the Fourth at her ranch at Watsonville. 

SHARON. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Sharon entertained a house party at 
their home In Menlo recently. 

VON SCHROEDER.— Miss Janet and Edith Von Schroeder entertained a 
house party recently at "Eagles' Neat"' in San Luis Obispo County. 

WILSHIRE. — Miss Doris Wllshlre who, with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
William B. Wilshire, is spending the summer in San Rafael, enter- 
tained at a house party over the week-end. 

DANCES. 

ROADMOUSE. — Mr. and Mrs. Chester Roadhouse gave an informal 
dance recently at their home in Berkeley.. 

MUSICALES. 
FIELD. — Charles Field entertained at a musicalc in his home In Los 
Altos recently. 

DINNER DANCES. 
BREEDEN. — Mr. and Mrs Clarence Breeden entertained at an elaborate 

dinner dmce at their home at Buriingame recently, in honor of Mrs. 

Walton Hedges. 
MAUDE. — Mrs, C. E. Maude was hostess at a dinner dance :u Pebble 

Beach Lodge, Del Monte, last Saturday evening. 

MOTORING. 

BLAIR. — Mrs. Samuel Blair, Miss Jennie Blair and Mrs. SHimmers, who 
are touring the South in an automobile, will not return to San Fran- 
cisco for another week. 

BRESSE. — Mrs. Eugene Bresse and Miss Mctha McMahan and their 
guest. Miss Franc Pierce, who have beer, motoring through Southern 
California for the past month, are in town again. 

CTMMINGS. — Mr. and Mrs. Earl Cummlngs and Mr. and Mis. Mirks have 
returned from a motor trip to Del Monte, where they spent the Fourth 
of July. 

FLOOD.— Mr. and Mrs, James L. Flood, Miss Emma Flood and Miss 
Barbara Donahoe are enjoying a visit to Lake Tahoe, where they 
journeyed hy motor. 

FREEMAN. — Mrs. Eugene Freeman has returned to San Francisco after 
a motor trip through the northern part of the State. 

GIANNINI. — Mr. and Mrs. A. 1'. Glannlnl, Mrs. Scatena and Miss Scatena 
of this city are motoring from place to place in Southern BUTO] 

HAZARD.— Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Hazard and Mrs. H. C. Barrow motored 
from their home in Los Angeles to this city. 

MILLER. — Mr. and Mrs. William P. Miller have gone on a motor trip to 
Santa Cruz. 

PRINGLE. — Mr. and Mrs. James R, Pringle and a party of friends have 
left for au automobile trip through Lake County. 

SPROULE.— Mr. and Mis. Win. Sproule motored to Byron Springs re- 
cently. 

THOMAS.— Mr. and Mrs. William Thomas and Miss Gertrude have re- 
turned to Ross Valley, after motoring through the southern part of 
the Slat-. 

THORNE. — Dr. and Mrs. Walton Thorne have left for Lake County in 
their automobile, and will visit all of the springs and other resorts In 
that pretty country. 

ARRIVALS. 

ALDERSON. — Dr. and Mrs. Harry E". Alderson, who have been abroad 
for six months, are home again. 

ALEXANDER.— Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Alexander, the Misses Harriet. 
Janetta and Mary Alexander, have arrived from New York. 

BATES. — Miss Mary Bates has returned from Los Angeles, after a visit 
there of two months. 

BREEZE.— Mr. and Mrs. William Breeze have returned from St. Helena, 
where they had spent several days at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ral- 
ston Hamilton. 

BRUNE. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Brune and their three children have re- 
turned from a two years' sojourn In Europe. 

BUCKBEE.— Mrs. Spencer Buckbee and her niece, Miss Helen Holtnan. 
have returned from Castle Crag Farm. 

CLAY. — Mrs. C, C. Clay has returned to her home In Frultvale, after an 
interesting trip through Yellowstone Park. 

CUSHING. — Mrs. Sidney B. Cushlng, who has been East for several 
months, has returned home. 



July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



COOK. — Mrs. II. N. Cook 1ms returned after a trip around the world, 

and is again -it the Fairmont, where she wtll remain for an Indefinite 

Um< . 
DB CABRERA. U irera and Miss Gabrtell 

are visitors here from the city of ftfexii of Mrs. 

Thomas Ryan at her home In Green street. 
EVERETS.— Mr. and Mrs. p. Hvereta have returned to irtments 

at the Hlllcrest. 
FEE,— Miss Marcla Pee, who has been visiting Mrs. Prentis i oh Hali 

at Shasta Springs, has retui r home In Buchanan street. 

FLETCHER.— Mrs. James Fletcher has returned from *.etns 8p n 

where she spent a week as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Bishop. 
FRIEDLAnder. — Mr, an [ Carj Prledlander have returned from Los 

Angeles and are established at the Vendome in Ban Jose for the 

remainder of the summer. 
GAY.— Mrs. Richard Hoxle Gay of Washington, D. C„ with her little 

daughter. Virginia, Is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Cel- 

larius. of 2401 Fillmore street. 
GRAU. — Mr. and Mrs. Otto Grau have returned from their wedding trip, 

and are occupying their residence on Green and Broderick streets. 
GRAVES. — Mrs. Robert N. Graves has returned to her home in California 

street after a few days" visit with Mrs. E. Norwood at Palo Alto 
GREEK. — Mr. and Mrs. Eldridge Green returned to town after a visit 

With Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Green at San Mateo. 
GREENWAY. — Edward Greenway has returned from Lake Tahoe, where 

he spent a week recently, visiting several of the popular resorts. 
HADLEY. — Henry Hadley has returned from the East, where he has 

been for the last few weeks. 
HAMMOND. — Mrs. Richard Hammond, Mrs. Leonard Hammond and Miss 

Edwina Hammond have returned from a trip to Bear Creek Camp, 

near Bolinas. 
HAYNE. — Mr. and Mrs. Robin Y Hayne, who have been abroad on their 

honeymoon since the first of the year, have returned, and are guests 

of Mrs. Robert Y. Hayne at her home in San Mateo. 
HEWITT. — Mr. and Mrs. Dixwell Hewitt, who have been abroad for some 

time, returned on Monday. 
HOYT. — Lieutenant and Mrs. Charles Sherman Hoyt have returned from 

their wedding trip at Del Monte and Santa Barbara, and are now 

temporarily domiciled at the Hotel St. Francis. 
J AD WIN. — Mr. and Mrs. Donald Jadwin returned to town Monday, and 

are the guests of Mrs. Jadwin's grandmother, Mrs. Anna L. Bauer. 

at her home in Patific avenue. 
JOHNSTON. — Mr. and Mrs. Jack Johnston have returned to the city, after 

spending several days in Mill Valley at the home of Mrs. Johnston's 

sister, Miss Eleanor Landers. 
KING. — Mr. and Mrs. Ralph King are in town from their ranch to spend 

a month With their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. King. 
KUTZ. — Paymaster James Kutz has arrived at Mare Island . where he 

will be on duty on the receiving ship Independence. 
LANGDON. — Mrs. Jesse Langdon has come from the East, and is the 

guest of her sister, Miss Mary Dunham, at Los GatOS. 
LEAHY. — Mrs. William Leahy and her son have returned to the Har- 
rington home on California street, after a visit at Colusa. 
McGREGOR. — Mr. and Mrs. John McGregor and Miss Katiehelle Mc- 
Gregor have arrived from the East, and are at their home in Green 

street. 
MADDERN. — Miss Merle Maddern returned to town on Monday after a 

trip to Del Monte and Carmel. 
MANSFIELD.— Waller D. Mansfield has returned to the Fairmont after 

a sojourn at Truckee. 
MARTEL.— Mrs. Jane Martel and her daughter. Miss Adele Martel. have 

returned from a brief visit at the Peninsula. 
MARTIN.— Mrs. Eleanor Martin has returned from Napa, where she vis- 
ited her son, Walter S. Martin and family. 
MeCREERY. — Mrs. Fannie McCroerv and Mis. .1. B. Wright have returned 

to this city after an outing at Del Monte. 
McINTYRE.- -Among the re rom the Philippines are i 

and Mrs. Augustine Mclntyre. 
MILLER, — John Owen Miller and Harvey Kindt returned to the city on 

Monday, after having passed the week-end with Mends in Mill \ 
MORROW. — Judge w. w. Morrow and Mrs Morrow retui ned Tuesday 

from an outing at Applegate. 
OLSEN. — Mrs. Allen Olsen has arrived from Corom do, and is the e 

her parents, Mr. and Mrs. lattiani. In Alan 

POTTER.— Mr, and Mrs. Milo Potter and Miss Nina Jones, of Santa Bar- 
bara are at the Ps 

POWER, — Miss ,\i:i > Power, sietei ol N"eaJ Powei risitine here from 

Washington, 1 1. C. 

RECTOR. — Mr. and Mrs. Howard Rector have returned from their 

honeymoon trip in the I are established at the Mount Wash- 

ington apartments 

REDDING.— Mr. and Mrs. a p. R< rke and Miss 

Katharine Redding have returned from Del Monte, afl 
weeks" stay. 

REEVE.— Mrs. Ernest Manning d Reeve, U, 3. A., 

arrived from Port Leavenworth, and is visiting at the home of 
her brother and and Mrs, William m 

Parker, In Berk* 

ROEDEL. — Miss Clara Roedel Is again at the Monroe, aft 
t\\ o morn : ilia. 

SHEA.- Mrs. .lain returned to her home On Broadway, after 

tl ill trip to Bartli tt 
SMITH. Miss Ella 1. Smith return the week to her apart- 

ments at the Bellevue, after a visit out of town as the guest of Mr. 
and Mrs, Alexander Heyneman. 



i 
tkvis. Mr. and Mi- w 1 1 II am ,.„j w m 

In ;it thol town until 

wedding, 

nd the 

. 

■liner, 

v ' ,N ; -' ! . Miss Jan I to tin tj for a 

1,1 let vlall . Mar- 

tin at her hon In Broai 

WETTH ER] i .i i lapte M thei - i 

Manil l, and pi al the past week at the P 

WHEELER.- Ai, and Mrs, Charles s. Wheeler and thi IClssi SI 
and Jean Wheeler, who have been In the East, are horn- 

STOUNGBR. — Mrs. W. J, Zounger has c ■ from New 7ork, and will be 

joined later by Doctor lounger, who la coming to Call fori 

August. 

DEPARTURES. 

A I kins.— BrontJ M. Aikins has left for a trip to Los Angeles on business. 

BELLEW.— Miss Helen Bellew lias left for Seattle and Vani vqt. While 

North she will be the guest of Mrs. George Butterfleld of Seattle. 

BLISS.— Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bliss have gone to Tahoe, where they will 
spend several weeks. 

BOOTH.— Mrs. S. F. Booth and Miss Edna Booth have left for Shasta 
Springs, to remain until August. 

BROOKE.— Mr. and Mrs. John Franklin Brooke are going to Santa Bar- 
bara for the summer. Miss Celie Brooke and John Brooke, Jr., go 
with them. 

CAMERON.— George Cameron has gone to New York to greet Mrs. Cam- 
eron, who has been with her mother, Mrs. M. H. de Young, at Carls- 
bad, for several weeks, 

COSGRAVE. — Dr. llilliceut Cosgrave has left for New York, where sin- 
will make an extended visit with her brother, John O'Hara Cosgrave. 

COWLES. — Miss Cecil Cowles has gone to Sonora to visit Miss Audine 
Abbott lor two weeks. 

COTLE. — Mrs. Mariana Coyle and her daughters, Angela and Maizie, have 
gone to Aptos, where they will spend the summer. 

CURTIS.— Dr. and Mrs. E. E. Curtis will leave shortly for Seattle and 
Bremerton, where they will enjoy a visit of several weeks. 

DEADY.— Mrs. Mary Thompson Deady has given up her apartment in 
Jackson street, and has gone to Palo Alto, where she will pass the 
next three months. 

DE LAVEAGA. — Mr. and Mrs. Edward de Laveaga have returned to the 
De Laveaga ranch in Contra Costa County after a visit of several 
days in town. 

FAY.— Mr. and Mrs. Paul Fay have sailed for Europe, where they will be 
for the next few months. 

PREAR.— Governor and Mrs. W. F. Frear have sailed for their home in 
Honolulu. 

CHAVES.— Mrs. Robert N. Graves has taken a house at Palo Alto, and 
has left for her new home, accompanied by her grandsons, Melville and 
Robert White. 

HALE. — Mr. and Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale have left for New York, where 
they will remain for a stay of six weeks. 

HINCKLEY.— Miss Helen Hinckley, who has been visiting friends in 
Oakland, has joined her mothei and sisters in Beowawe, Nev. 

KBENEY.— Miss Innea Keeney tiai returned to Mlramar after a brief 

stay In town. 

KRONSTRAND. — Bror Kronstrand left Thursday for the North. He will 
visit Portland and the Yellowstone Park before returning to San 
Francisi 1 1 

MARTEL.— Miss Adele Martel will leavi in a tew days for an outing in 

S ■ where she will be the guest for a fortnight of the 

Misses Anna and Emma Kenyon at their country home. 

MASTEN. — Mrs, Joseph Manuel Masteti. with her daughters, the Misses 
Eugenie and Kathryn, will leave to-day for a three week's visit at 
San ' 

(Continued to Page 22.) 



THE Le GRAND 

Ladies' Tailors 

BRANCH OF OUR NEW YORK ESTABLISHMENT 
FIFTH AVENUE AND 32nd STREET 

In order to introduce our hieh class work we will make 
during the summer months our 

$85.00 Suits for $70.00 

80.00 Suits for 65.00 

75.00 Suits for 6O.00 

70.00 Suits for 55 00 

65.00 Suits for 50.00 

60.00 Suits for 45.00 

55.00 Suits for 40.00 

50.00 Suits for 35.00 

J07 SUTTER STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO PHONE DOUGLAS 4122 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 




INANCIAL 




After a period of uncertainty and 
Eastern Bond Market, anxiety, which we passed through 
awaiting the result of the Presiden- 
tial nominations, we find that the momentous events are now 
things of the past, and that nothing has happened. 

The stock market still remains dull, and people are now wait- 
ing for the results of the election. 

In our minds, the nomination of Mr. Wilson for the Demo- 
cratic candidate is a good thing, and cannot help but have a 
salutary effect on business throughout the country. While he 
is radical, at the same time he is an intelligent radical, care- 
fully weighing his thoughts before acting upon them, and as 
long as the country is demanding a radical, it is far better to 
have one of a judicial mind than a fire-eater of the Roosevelt 
type. 

We must, of course, face the fact that the tariff is going to 
be tampered with. True, it will unsettle business while the 
changes are going on, but there will be compensating factors. 

Tariff reduction will largely reduce many production costs, 
and this will lead to the "consummation devoutly to be wished 
for" by the whole country, viz., the lowering of the cost of liv- 
ing. This will favorably affect big enterprises like the rail- 
roads. We do not think that Democratic legislation of a seri- 
ous menace to legitimate business interests will be put through. 

Crop prospects are holding up well, and barring unlooked for 
weather disturbances, should be all that could be desired. Corn 
in particular seems especially safe, and we therefore recom- 
mend the purchase of such stock as Atchison, Southern Pacific, 
St. Louis, San Francisco, Missouri, Kansas, Texas, etc. 

The Eastern bond market presents exceptional opportuni- 
ties for the purchase of cheap, high-class bonds netting the 
investor from 4V 2 to SVi Per cent. — By Byrne & McDonnell. 



Local Stocks 
And Bonds. 



The market opened with a very en- 
couraging increase in the volume of 
business after the Fourth of July 
adjournment of the Exchange. 
Prices were strong, and in a number of instances, especially in 
the bonds, made substantial gains. The unusually large in- 
quiry was due to the general dividend distributions of July 1st, 
seeking reinvestment in good local securities. It is roundly 
estimated that some $10,000,000 was paid out in dividends at 
the close of the fiscal year, June 30th. The Power companies 
were all very strong, especially Great Western and Oro, based 
in a large degree on their improved prospects owing to recent 
decisions of the State Railroad Commission, which gives them 
permission to enter the bay counties field with their service 
from the high Sierras. Both companies are selling bonds to 
raise funds to extend their service in the new territory. Spring 
Valley Water stock showed marked recovery since its slump to 
60. Associated Oil settled to 44 Vz asked during the week, and 
has lost the extraordinary activity which marked its movements 
during the week preceding the Fourth of July adjournment. 
Hutchinson was the liveliest and strongest of the Sugars, and 
sold up to 20 1 / 2 . The others are in fair demand, but the big 
sugar crop and present prices seem to have been very closely 
discounted some time ago by the wise men who make Sugars 
their specialty. 



The big half million dollar fire in 
Mining Share Market, the business section of Tonopah 

fortunately did no damage to the 
mines, and prices exhibited a much better tone after the ex- 
citement was over. The output of the camp continues to 
range above the $210,000 mark weekly, and dividends are 
being paid with encouraging regularity by nearly all the pro- 
ducers. The most important event of the week was putting 
Belmont's new mill in commission. The stamps began drop- 
ping Monday, and the net income of that strong property will 
be greatly increased thereby. The stock remains firm around 



$10, which indicates what the shareholders think of their prop- 
erty. The Goldfields remain fairly steady, with no feature of 
consequence. Interest in that camp is centered in the sinking 
of the Meyer Mines' shaft to the 2,000 level. An ore body 
was recently cut in the descent, but, according to the policy 
originally marked out by the company, nothing will be done in 
the mining line until the main shaft is completed. The strike, 
however, sent up the price of the stock some 10 cents per share, 
where it has remained. The rest of the list, including the 
Comstocks, remain quiet and listless. 



An abstract of the condition of the 
State Bank Conditions. State banks, as of June 14, 1912, 
shows individual deposits of $532,- 
951,777, as against $481,195,255.62 on June 7, 1911, a gain of 
$51,756,521.38. On the call of February 9th of this year the 
deposits were $522,945,776.82. The figures for June 14, 1912, 
are those of 519 State banks, including 64 branches, comprising 
150 commercial banks, 132 savings, 7 trust companies and 166 
departmental banks. 

San Francisco leads with deposits of $215,575,444.91, against 
$201,736,897.41 on June 7, 1911. Other cities show: Los An- 
geles, $102,066,953.79, against $82,347,756.52; Oakland, $39,- 
126,181.77, against $35,342,717.02; Sacramento, $12,206,904.30, 
against $11,820,107.74; San Diego, $9,350,774.89, against 
$7,249,013.26; Stockton, $12,476,042.11, against $10,962,046.34; 
State, excluding the above, $142,149,475.23, against $131,736,- 
717.33. 

Loans on real estate in the State are $304,184,211.20, 
against $268,589,867.43 a year ago, and other loans and dis- 
counts are $112,450,067.52, against $110,474,617.77. Total re- 
sources and liabilities are $666,998,510.30, against $608,858,- 
170.15 a year ago. Undivided profits are $14,556,313.73, 
against $14,218,605.14, and State, county and municipal de- 
posits, $13,523,430.65, against $13,384,778.52. Capital within 
the year has increased from $58,663,347.55 to $60,675,195.33. 



byrne & McDonnell 

MEMBERS 
New York Stock Exchange 

New York Cotton Exchange 

Chicago Board of Trade 

Securities Bought and Sold on Commission 

STOCKS, BONDS, COTTON AND GRAIN 

Private 'Wires to Chicago and New York 

M. L. MACK, Resident Partner F. TH1ERIOT, Manager 

409 Pine Street, San Francisco 



ON JULY 1, 1912 

We will move our offices to 410 Montgomery Street 

Our Facilities for handling 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

Will be considerably increased 

Established 1858 

SUTRO & CO. 



Telephone Sutter 3434 



Private Exchange Connecting: all Depts. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

French-American Bank of Savings (Savings Department.) 

For the half year ending June 30, 1912, a dividend has been declared at 

the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Monday. July 1, 1912. Dividends not called for are 

added to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal from July 

1. 1912. A. LEGALLET, President. 

Office — 108 Sutter street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hlbernla Savings and Loan Society. 
For the six months ending June 30, 1912, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three and three-fourths (3%) per cent per annum on all 
deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Monday, July 1, 1912. Divi- 
dends not drawn will be added to depositors' accounts, become a part 
thereof, and will earn dividend from July 1, 1912. Deposits made on or 
before July 10, 1912, will draw interest from July 1, 1912. 

R. M.TOBIN, Secretary. 
Office — Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Italian-American Bank. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1912, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, free of 
taxes, payable on and after Monday, July 1, 1912. Dividends not called 
for will be added to the principal and bear the same rate of interest 
from July 1, 1912. Money deposited on or before July 10. 1912, will earn 
interest from July 1, 1912. A. SBARBORO, President 

Office — S. E. corner of Montgomery and Sacramento Sts., S. F. 



July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



The production of anthracite in Pennsylvania in 1911, 

according to a statement just issued by Statistician E. W. Par- 
ker, of the United States Geological Survey, broke all previous 
records, exceeding the previous maximum output in 1907 by 
4,700,000 long tons. The complete returns to the Survey show 
a production in 1911 of 80,732,015 long tons, valued at $174,- 
852,843. This was an increase over the 1910 output of 5,298,- 
767 long tons in quantity and $14,577,541 in value. In this 
increased activity and augmented production in 1911 the an- 
thracite industry was in marked contrast to the bituminous in- 
dustry, which showed decreases throughout most of the mining 
regions. Moreover, in most of the bituminous districts prices 
were generally lower, whereas the average price of anthracite 
in 1911 was 5 cents a ton higher than in 1910. Prices for the 
domestic sizes remained the same, but greater returns were re- 
ceived from pea coal and the smaller sizes. 



Following is the record of the production of crude petro- 
leum in California, together with the storage on hand, for the 
first five months of 1912 : 

Month — Barrels 

January 7,627,000 

February 6,900,000 

March 7,300,000 

April 7,210,000 

May 7,335,000 

Total storage May 31st 42,981,000 

Storage December 31, 1911 41,663.000 

Total production for the five months, 36,372,000 barrels. 
These figures show an average production per month of 7,374,- 
400 barrels, or at the rate of 87,292,800 barrels per annum. The 
storage has gained 1,318,000 barrels since December 31, 1911, 
or at the rate of 263,000 barrels per month. 

The average production of the State appears to be steadily 
maintained. 



San Francisco bank clearings for the week were $54,- 

229,069.11, against $46,811,534.78 for the corresponding week 
last year, both weeks including a holiday and being for five 
days' business. The substantial gain is due to the increased 
disbursements on account of interest and dividend payments, 
and in this connection is highly reflective of improved business 
conditions. 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



New York Slock Eichant* 

New York Cotton Exchaofe 

Chicago Board of Trad* 

The Stock and Bond Exchange. Sin Francuco 



Main Office 
MILLS BUILDING 

San Franciico, California 



Braach Office* 

Loi Angeles Sao Diego 
Coronado Beach Portland, Ore. 
Seattle, Wash. Vancouver, B. G. 



SULTAN TURKISH BATHS 

624 POST STREET. 

Special Department for Ladles. 

Open Day and Night for Ladles and Gentlemen. 

Al. Johnson, formerly of Sutter Street Hammam, has leased the. 

Sultan Turkish Baths, where he will be glad to see his old and new 

customers. 



Valuable Newspaper Information 

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$13,500. Enquire into this. Full 
particulars from 



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232 MONTGOMERY ST. 



Real Estate Agents 



MILLS BUILDING 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 



S®dsiS m/& IP@ir§®ifi}<ffl! Htouns 



(Continued from Page 19.) 

McDERMOTT — Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. McDermott have left for San 

Jose, making their home at the Vendome for a month. 
MEYERSTEIN.— Mr. and Mrs. C. V. Meyerstein and the latter's daughter, 

Miss Inez Marion, have left for Santa Cruz, to remain a month. 
MURPHY. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Lawrence Murphy and their two little 

children will leave shortly for the Phelan ranch in Santa Cruz, where 

they will pass the remainder of the summer. 
NEILSON— Mrs. YVilham Delaware Neilson has returned to the Felton 

home in Menlo Park after spending several days with her son-in-law 

and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Christian de Guigne. Jr., in San Mateo. 
NEWTON. — Mrs. California Newton and her daughter and son, Miss 

Suzette and Phillip Newton, have gone to their home on the Russian 

River, near Guerneville, for the summer. 
PEIXOTTO. — Mrs. Edgar D. Peixotto and the children have gone to 

Miramar for the summer. 
RENISON. — Reverend "William T. Renison and Mrs. Renison of Stockton, 

who have been visiting in this city, have gone to Carmel. 
RITSON. Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Ritson have left for a visit of several weeks 

in the East, and will be the guests of their son-in-law and daughter, 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Ballou in Medford. 
SEXTON. — Mrs. Ella Sexton has gone to Honolulu, expecting to remain 

for a month in the Islands. 
SMEDBURG.— Mrs. "William Smedburg and Miss Cora Smedburg have 

closed their apartments at the St. Xavier, and have left for Miramar, 

where they will spend the month of July. 
SPERRY.— Mr. and Mrs. Horace Sperry have left for Glen Alpine Springs, 

Tahoe, where they will remain during the month of July. 
SUSHANE. — Miss Sushane. of the Hotel Richelieu, left last Sunday for 

a stay of six weeks at Atlantic City and New York. 
TALLANT.- Mrs. John D. Tallant is en route to Santiago, Chile, where 

she will visit her son, Jack Tallant. for an indefinite time. 
TAYLOR. — Mr and Mrs. Montell Taylor have closed their home in Oak- 
land, and have gone to Brookdale, where they have taken a bungalow 

for the summer. 
THOMPSON. — Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Thompson and Mr. and Mrs. Louis 

Thompson have left for their home in Portland, after a visit in San 

Francisco. 
VERNON. — Mr. and Mrs. Howard Vernon and Misses Helen, Ruth and 

Mae Vernon have left for the South. They will spend some weeks in 

Los Angeles and San Diego. 
"WALKER. — Mrs. O. V. Walker and her granddaughter, Miss Eleanor Tay, 

will sail for Honolulu on the 26th of this month. 
"WHITE. — Mrs. Loveli Wnite left recently for a visit of a few days with 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralston "White at Mill Valley. 
WHITING. — Mr. and Mrs. Randolph Whiting have gone to Salt Lake, and 

will visit Yellowstone Park for some weeks, returning home by way 

of Portland. 
WILCOX. — Mrs. John Wilcox and her youngest son have left for Juneau, 

Alaska, where they will remain for several years. 
WILLIAMS.— Miss Ellen Williams, Miss Finnigan and Miss A. Finnigiin 

are at Miramar from San Mateo. 
WISSER. — Colonel John "Wisser and his son, Edward Wisser, left the 

Presidio Tuesday for a trip to Southern California. 
WORTHINGTON.— Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Wurthington have left for Hono- 
lulu to attend the marriage of their niece. Miss Thelma Parker, to 

Henry G. Smart, on the 26th of the month. 
WRIGHT.— Mr. and Mrs. Francis Wright and their family have left for 

the Santa Cruz Mountains for a fortnight's stay. 
YOUNG. — Mrs. Francis J. Young will leave next week for Cisco, and will 

remain for two weeks. 

INTIMATIONS. 

ALEXANDER. — Mrs. Charles O. Alexander has been a guest of the 
Rudolph Spreckels family at their ranch in Sonoma County for the 
past few days. 

ALEXANDER. — Leo. Alexander and Michael Alexander will spend a short 
vacation at Yellowstone Park. 

ANDERSON. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Anderson have leased the Alexan- 
der Garceau house for next season. 

BAKER. — Miss Dorothy Baker has returned from Ross Valley, where 
she has been the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Baker for the past 
month. She has Joined her aunt, Miss Kate Stone, at El Drlsco Apart- 
ments. 

i UlRETT, — Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Barrett are enjoying a visit in Yosemlte 
Valley with their children. 



BAXTER.— Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Baxter have taken a cottage at Ben 

Lomond for the summer. 
BECK.— Miss Edith Beck is the guest of Mrs. Philip Wadsworth, who is 

making her home in Tulare. 
BECKER. — Mr. and Mrs. Ryland Alden-Becker and Miss Dorothy Alden- 

Becker are in Santa Cruz for the summer. 
BLAIR. — Mrs. B'.alr and Miss Jennie Blair are at Santa Barbara. 
BOHRMANN. — William C. Bohrmann will spend the summer months in 

Sausalito, where he will be the guest of his brother-in-law and sister, 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Clay Miller. 
BOGGS. — Mrs. John Boggs, who has been living at the Sutter, has taken 

an apartment at the Fairmont Hotel. 
BOOMER. — Mrs. A. H. Boomer, of New York, has gone to San Jose after 

a delightful visit here. 
BOTHIN. — Mrs. Jane Whittier Bothin and Miss Genevieve Bothin are at 

Tahoe for several weeks. 
BOURN. — Mr. and Mrs. William Bowers Bourn will leave shortly for Ire- . 

land to spend a few months with their son-in-law and daughter, Mr. 

and Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent. 
BROOKS. — Miss Ruth Brooks is entertaining Miss Malzle Coyle at tha 

Presidio for a few days. 
BROWN. — Mrs. C. Elwood Brown has sailed from New York for South- 
ern Europe, where she will join relatives who are abroad. 
L'ROWX. — Mrs. Henry Ward Brown Is entertaining her sister-in-law. 

Mrs. A. McDermott, who has just returned from a few weeks' visit 

in Santa Barbara. 
BRYANT. — Mrs. A. W. Bryant passed a few days in town recently, but 

has returned to Mill Valley. 
CAROLAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Francis Carolan, who went abroad two months 

ago, are passing the summer In Paris. 
CHASE. — Mrs. Horace Blanchard Chase and Miss Ysabel Chase are pre- 
paring to leave soon for Miramar. 
COWLES. — Miss Cecil Cowles is visiting Miss Audine Abbott at Sonora. 
CROW. — Mr. and Mrs. John Crow are at Monte Rio for the summer. 
CURTIS. — Dr. and Mrs. E. E. Curtis, of Yerba Buena, have been ordered 

to Guam. They will go to Bremerton for several months, and proceed 

from there to their new station. 
DAVIS. — Mrs Richard Davis is at Webber Lake, enjoying a vacation trip. 
DENMAN. — Mrs. James Denman is the guest of her daughter and son-in- 
law, Major and Mrs. Frank Cheatham, at Honolulu. 
DE SABLA. — Mr. and Mrs. Eugene de Sabla, Mr. and Mrs. Clem Tobin, 

and Miss Vera de Sabla, who have been abroad for several months, 

are now In Paris. 
DROWN. — Miss Newell Drown is spending several days as the guest of 

Miss Beth Livermore at the beautiful Livermore ram-h, Montesol. 

near St. Helena. 
DU BOIS. — Miss Hannah and Miss Emily Du Bols, who have been spend- 
ing a month at Glen Alpine, will return shortly to pass the remainder 

of the summer in San Rafael. 
EASTLAND. — Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Eastland are at Tahoe. where they 

will remain for the coming fortnight. 
FARRELL. — Mrs. James Farreli and Miss Kathleen Farrell are at Tahoe, 

where they will remain during the month of July. 
FISHER. — Mrs Oscar Fisher and daughter, Miss Hortense. are at Monte 

Rio for the summer. 
FLANDERS. — Mr. and Mrs. Junius Aiken Flanders are entertaining Mr. 

and Mrs. George Wyeth, of Chicago, at their home In Burllngame. 
FLOOD. — Mr. and Mrs. James L. Flood, accompanied by little Miss Emma 

Flood and Miss Barbara Donol are enjoying the delights of Yosem- 

Ite Valley. 
FLOOD. — Miss Jane Flood and her guest. Miss Crosby, are spending a 

week at Del Monte. 
FOI'TE. — Miss Augusta Foute is the gueM <<i Mrs. E. J. McCutcheon at 

her country home at Lake Tahoe. 
FRANKLIN. — Mrs. Walter Scott Franklin is enjoying herself visiting 

relatives in Vienna. 
FREEMAN. — Mrs. Eugene Freeman will go East late In the summer to 

visit her daughter, Mrs. Russell Bogue. 
<;a ULINGTON. — Mrs. Ernest Garllngton and her daughter. Miss Salhe 

Garllngton, are visiting at Governor's Ishmd, where they are the 

house guests of Colonel and Mrs. Stephen C. Mills. 
GHIRAUDUI.DI. - .Mr. and Mrs. D L. < JhiranlHli are enjoying a visit In 

Portland, where they will remain during the month. 
GRAHAM. — Judge and Mrs. Thomas F. Graham and their daughter. Miss 

Ethel Graham, arc enjoying an outing at Crag View, and wilt remain 

there during July. 
GREEN. — Mr. and Mrs. Eldridge Green spent the Fourth in Ross Valley 

with Mrs. Green's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Jay Foster. 

Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Eugene Payne, dentists, have resumed 

practice at 146 Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 66. Hours: 9 to 4. 



THROUGH RAILROAD TICKETS 

Issued to All Parts or 

United States, Canada and Mexico 

In Connection With These Magnificent Passenger Steamers 



Portland 

First Class $10. $12. $15 
Second Class $6 



Los Angeles 

First Class $8 .35 
Second Class $5.35 




SAILINGS EVERY FIVE DAYS 



The San Francisco & Portland S. S. Co. 
A. OTTINGER, General Agent 

Ticket Offices, 722 Market, opp. Call, Tel. Sutter 2344 

8 East St., opp. Ferry Bide., Tel. Sutter 2482. 
Berkeley Office: 2105 Shattuck, Tel. Berkeley 331. 



July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



QRBENBAUM.— Mr. and Mrs. Louis Qreenbaum, Loula Oreenbaum, Jr. 
and Miss Rosalie Qreenbaum, are In 

QRDfWOOD UIbg Emma Qrlmwood is a gueal of Miss Jeanetti 
at the Hooper ranch near Mountain View for aeveral days.. 

iianna -Mis. Selbj Banna and Mrs-. Charles Hughes have taken a cot- 
tage at Manila's Vineyard, where they will spend the remalnd 
the Bun 

Harris. — Mr. and Mrs. Ejawrei Harrl ■ spent the past few daya 

at their bungalow In Mill Valley. 
HARVEY.— Mr. ami Mrs. j. Downey Harvey spent the week-end with 

their son-in-law and daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Cooper, at theii 

Burlingame home. 

IIAYNE. — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hayne are receiving a cordial greeting 
from their friends In town and San Mateo since their return from their 
wedding journey abroad. They are the guests of Mrs. Robert Y. 
Hayne at San Mateo. 

HATS.— Mrs. Lucie May Hays is visiting the Misses Jolliffe at their ranch 
in Sonoma County. 

HEARST. — Mrs. Phoebe Hearst is entertaining as her guests at Pleasanton 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Clark, who reside at the Netherlands In New 

York. 
HENRY. — Mrs. Kate Voorhies Henry is preparing to pass the winter in 

Washington. D. C, and will leave in about six weeks for the trip. 
HENSHAW.— Mrs. William G. Henshaw. Miss Florence Henshaw and 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chiekering. who have been abroad for the last 

few months, will sail for America next week. 
HERRMAN. — Miss Erna Herrman is one of a jolly party who is spending 

several weeks at Glenbrook. 
HESKETH.— Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Permer-Hesketh have arrived in 

England, and are once more settled on their country estate. 
HEWITT. — Mr. and Mrs. Dixwell Hewitt, who have spent several weeks 

in Paris, have gone to London to remain until the latter part of July. 
HOLCOMBE. — Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Holcombe have returned to their home 

in Belvedere, alter a visit with the Reverend and Mrs. Webster Lor- 

ing Clarke at their residence in Vallejo street. 
HOPKINS. — Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hopkins are enjoying their honeymoon 

in the southern part of the State. They are visiting at Santa Barbara. 
HUNT. — Mrs. Randall Hunt is visiting Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Baker in 

Ross Valley. 
KENYON. — Charles Kenyon, the author and playwright, has taken apart- 
ments at the Hotel Bellevue. where his parents, Dr. and Mrs. James 

Kenyon, reside. 
LYLE. — Dr. Annie G. Lyle, who has been visiting Mrs. Russell Wilson in 

San Mateo, has returned to town. 
MANSFBLDT.— Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Mansfeldt are passing the month of 

July at Del Monte. 
MARTIN.— Mrs. Camilla Martin has given up her apartment at the St. 

Xavier, and leaves soon for a year's trip around the world. 
McCORMICK — Mr. and Mrs. E. O. McCormick and Miss Henry, a sister 

of Mrs. McCormick, who is visiting here from the East, are at Santa 

Cruz. 
McCRACKEN. — Mrs. Alexander McCracken and Miss Isabelle McCracken 

are at Carmel-by-the-Sea for a two or three weeks' visit. 
MILLER. — Mr. and Mrs. H. M. A. Miller are at Del Monte for a few 

weeks' visit. 
MINTZER. — Miss Mauricla Mintzer and her brothers, Lucio and William, 

took possession of their home in Ross on Wedni 
MURPHY'. — Captain anil Mrs. John Burke Murphy are spending a week 

in the Y'osemite. 
MURPHY.— Eugene Murphy, who la mi a trip in Seattle, will return the 

middle of July, ami will Join Mrs Murphy at Burlingame. 
NEWHALL. — Mrs. William Mayo Newhall ami Miss Marian Newhall 

will go to Santa Barbara lalci in the season, t.. ■ it the 

Hotel Potter. 
PALMER. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Spencel Palmer have taken possession 

of the attractive residence mi stelner Btreet ami Broadway which 

was formerly occupied by Dr. ami Mrs. Cluni 
PETERS.- Mrs. J. D. Peters I Miss Anna Petera will pass the summer 

at 1 i,l Monte. 
PORTER.— Mr. ami Mrs. w. F. Porter will occupy the Einil Qreenebaum 

hOUBe on their return to town lor next season. 
REED, — Mr. and Mrs. F. Reed arc ' outing at Truekee, and 

Will remain for s, 
REES. — Lieutenant and Mrs. \ . are en route to &n Francisco 

from the Orient, where they have been I'm the past few months. 
RUCKER.- M lames Rucker and Miss Edith Rucker arc at the Potter 

at Santa Barbara, 
SCOTT.— Henry T Mr. ami Mrs. Walter 

at ei end. 

SHORB.— Mlsa Ethel Sborb and her aunt. Miss Wilson, have gone to 

Stockholm ter tin Olympic games. They are enjoying a tour of 
Ope lies summer. 
SMITH. — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hayes Smith and their young son are 

fonts. 
STOVEL— Mr. an 1 Mrs. Charles .' Stove] and Miss Marian Stovel are at 

Webber Lake, where they will remain until the middle of August. 
SYM.MFS. — Mr, ami Mrs. Frank J. Symmes and Miss Mabel Symmes will 

return in the near future from Honolulu, where they have been enjoy- 
ing a two months' visit 
Til. I. MAN.- Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Tillman and Miss Agnes Tillman. 

who have been touting Europe for the last few months, are at present 
oying a trip throush Holland. 
I'l'HAM. --Isaac Upham has arrived In London, after spending the month 

of June touring France and Germany. 



In town n 

W isi.le •„ l,e ,v,||, . 

WARNER ' 

In the potlatch tournan 

WEBS i ! 

outing at risen, and will be away for several . 

WEILL.— Raphael ueiu w , n remain In Pa 

to his present plans, ami hae lUI .1 in the >.-, , 

interesting trip through the Suez Canal, ftlor, ,, ami 

through Italy. 

WHITTELL.— Mr. and Mrs. Cle- 
at Lake Tahoe for a week's visit. 

WILSON.— Mrs. J. C. Wi , children are ipendlng a fen 

at Casa del Rey. 

WILSON.— Mrs. Mountford Wilson and her son, Mountford, Jr., penl 
the week-end at Del Monte. 

WORDEN.— Mr. and Mrs. Clinton E. Worden, aocompai < Mrs. A. N. 

Towne, are at Del Monte, where they will remal i several days 

longer. 



THE BRIDAL MORN. 



White, luminous white, as shaded lamp might be, 
And tremulous-sweet the bride for robing came, 
Her wide eyes, lifted, globed a lucent flame, 

Her movements flowed to unheard melody. 

And wonder-stirred her sisters were to see 

How love had sealed her with imperious claim; 
How her young comeliness might put to shame 

Some Greek maid laved in cool Callirrhoe. 

She turned her from the jasmined sill. She smiled 
At satin splendors shimmering as they spread, 

And kissed her hand whereon His lips had lain, — 
Then heard her mother's voice. — Her heart leaped wild ; 
She flung herself in prayer beside her bed ; 

"O God," she wept, "O love! O joy! pain!" 
— Nellie Richmond Eberhart in the American. 



"This bill was innocent on its face, but beneath there 

lurked a most sinister significance." The speaker, Senator 
Clark, was discussing in Little Rock a measure of which he 
disapproved. "The bill reminded me, in fact," he said, "of a 
Little Rock urchin's question. His question, innocent enough 
in appearance, dear knows, was this : 'Would you mind making 
a noise like a frog, uncle ?' 'And why,' said the uncle, with an 
amused smile ; 'why, Tommy, do you desire me to make a noise 
like a frog?' 'Because,' replied the urchin, 'whenever I ask 
daddy to buy me anything he always says, 'Wait till your 
uncle croaks!'" — A/. Y. Tribune. 



Finley Peter Dunne, creator of Mr. Dooley, was dining 

with a friend at a New York restaurant. Rice-birds were served. 
The tiny cadavers, picked and lean, were brought in upon large 
slices of toast. "Poor little things!" said the host. "Seems a 
shame to kill 'em — don't it? How do you suppose they ever 
murder enough rice birds to make a dish?" Dunne turned over 
an infinitesimal specimen with his fork. "I don't know," he 
said, "unless they use insect powder!" — Saturday Evening Post. 



Pat was busy on a Hull road, working with his coat off. 

There were two Englishmen laboring on the same road, so they 
decided to have a joke with the Irishman. They painted a 
donkey's head on the back of Pat's coat, and watched to see 
him put it on. Pat, of course, saw the donkey's head on his 
coat, and, turning to the Englishmen, said: "Which of yez 
wiped your face on my coat?" — Tit-Bits. 



There were times when McFee gloried in the fact that 

he was the father of nine children, even if they were on the 
lines of the proverbial stepladder, but on the day when he was 
taking them out for a walk he felt chagrined. He was walking 
along at a fairly good gait when he was halted by a policeman, 
who asked: "I say, you, what you been doin'?" "Nothing," 
replied McFee; "why?" "Well, what's the crowd following 
you for?" — Judge. 



Discriminating people who appreciate good dining, 

superior service, tasteful surroundings and comfort, frequent 
Techau's Tavern, Market and Powell streets, in the heart of 
the theatre and hotel district. The 50 cent special lunches there 
are the best to be had in town. Drop in and try one. You will 
be sure to acquire the Techau lunch service. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 



TIh@ Cfgnnfag&nsry ©If totent 



Singer of hope for all the world 

Is it still morning where thou art, 
Or are the clouds that hide thee furled 

Around a dark and silent heart? 

The sacred chords thy hand could wake 

Are fallen on utter silence here; 
And hearts too little even to break 

Have made an idol of despair. 

Comeback! The fools that still deny 

And still destroy in hourly jest 
Tempt not thy truth with sophistry, 

But find it still too stern a test. 

Come back to England, where thy May 
Returns, but not that rapturous light ! 

God is not in His heaven to-day 

And with thy country naught is right. 

Paradox, mockery, doubt, and greed 

Break down the shrines with crackling laughter, 
And where a jester deigns to lead 

The lawless throng runs tumbling after. 

And some go mumming through the gloom, 
And laugh to find all souls astray; 

And some — our noblest — fold their doom 
Around them in the Roman way. 

But thou, whose thought, profound and pure, 
Moved like one intricate world, sublime 

With wheeling system, through the obscure, 
Unfaihomed skies of life and time, 

Across the dark didst flash the light 

Back to its primal fount above, 
Nor dream the nothingness of night 

Could e'er bring forth the wings of love, 

Or close them! Hear us, passionate soul, 

Crowned with rich grief, most strong, most wise, 

Oh, still, still point us to the goal 
That glorified thy constant eyes. 

No facile flatterers of the hour 

Dare mock as facile thy full hope, 
Whose mail-clad worlds marched on in power 

Up, up, not down, the Avernian slope. 

No shallow hearts dare find thy faith 
Shallow! Deep, deeper than the sea, 

Abides the love that stormed through death 
And marched to immortality. 

— Alfred Noyes in Harper's. 



A. W. Beift 



Alice Bstl 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1625 California Street 



Life ClUIM 
Day and Night 



Illustrating; 
Sketching 
Painting 



MANZANITA HALL 

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA. 
Makes a specialty of preparing boys and voung men for entrance 
to the universities. The location adjacent to Stanford University 
and to Palo Alto, a town of remarkable culture, makes possible a 
school life of unusual advantages and opportunities. 

Twentieth year opens Aug. 27, 1912. For catalogue and specific 
information, address 
W. A. SHEDD, Head Master. 



MISS HEAD'S SCHOOL, 
2538 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal. 
Boarding and day school; college preparation; accredited to college; 
25th year, August itith, 1912. 

MARY B. WILSON, M. L.. Principal. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



DOMINICAN 
COLLEGE 



SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIFORNIA 



KJ^ %J^ (J^ 



A Boarding School for Young Women, conducted by the Sisters 
of St. Dominic, situated In Magnolia Valley and protected by the 
lofty hills of the Tamalpals Range. Fifty minutes by boat and 
train from San Francisco. Climate unsurpassed for healthfulnesa. 
Ideal condition for scholastic work. 

Classical, Scientific and Commercial Courses. Specially organized 
departments of Music, Art and Domestic Economy. Weil equipped 
Library and Laboratory. Accredited by the University of California. 



The Raymond Coaching School 

Twelfth Year 

Individual Instruction Only. 
Preparation for University Entrance Examinations, 
for West Point, Annapolis and Professional 
Colleges. 

Ten departmental teachers of special training and 
extended experience. 

The chief purpose which the methods of the school 

seek to further: the development in the student 

of the greatest possible mental power. 

Telephone West 2751 

2659 California St. San Francisco 



PRIVATE INSTRUCTION ONLY 

Shorthand — Typewriting — Bookkeeping 

Munson School of Shorthand 

820 to 827 Whitney Building 

133 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 3671 LUC1LE SMITH, Principal 



Miss Harker's School pa c l a ? fo a rnu 

Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year begins August ISth. 
Catalogue upon application. 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 

425 Mc Allister St.San Francisco. 



Each leads to a Lucrative Position 



July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



25 




mowjsm 



;;.' 



•• -'-ff 



By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

New licenses were issued to the following purchasers of au- 
tomobiles in San Francisco and vicinity for the week ending 
July 6th. The total number of licenses issued for the State 
for the same period was 50S. 



WELISCH, W. T.. 24 California St., s. F Wlnton 

SCOVEL, GEO. S.. 754 Howard Si.. S. F Oakland 

DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & I1AYDEN CO.. S. F Chalmers 

8UDEN, OTTO TUM, 300S Clav St.. S. F Stearns 

SCOTT, A. M., 529 Noe St.. S. F Oakland 

NATIONAL ELEC. CO., 103 Turk St.. S. F Oakland 

LEVI STRAUSS CO.. Battery and Finn Sts.. S. F White 

McARTHUR, D. T., 25 Linda Ave.. Oakland Flanders 

HIBBERD, ALICE H„ 1305 28th Ave., Oakland E-M-F 

FLEITZ, A., 263S Market St., Oakland Flanders 

GREEN. A. W., 1423 34th Ave., Oakland Ford 

WALDMAN. R. O., 1625 Virginia St., Berkeley Flanders 

THOMAS, \V. O.. 850 53d St.. Oakland Rambler 

DAVIS, MRS. A., 2425 College Ave., Berkeley Detroit 

GALL VIS, JEANNE M., Peninsula Hotel. San Mateo Carterear 

BERINGER, P. N., Mill Valley Motorette 

BRUN. P. U.. 56 Lenzen Ave.. San Jose Oakland 

HERZOG, S. K., 410 B St., San Rafael Ford 

LEVI', JULIUS, 7U3 4th St., San Rafael Fora 

HEDGES, MRS. LEILA, 507 Butler Bldg., S. F Cadillac 

ROBINSON, WILFRED, 1174 Dolores St., s. P Bulek 

SCHWEITZER, MONROE. 136 6th St., S. F Carterear 

JEROME, JAS., Fife Bldg.. S. F Carterear 

FRENCH BAKERIES CO., 515 Clay St.. S. F Buick 

KEMPKEY, E. K.. 224 Mountain Ave., Oakland Buiek 

HUGHES, E. F., 802 Market St.. S. F Ford 

CURTIS, A. R., 23H9 Webster St., Alameda Overland 

HEINS, W. A.. 2399 Webster St.. Alameda Overland 

FISCHER'S VIENNA BAKERY. Berkeley Lippard 

AVERY, F. M., 315 California St., S. F Ilaynes 

FRANKLIN. CHAS., 267 1 1 Hi Ave., s. F Packard 

BRETSTEIN. DR. L. I., 1592 Washington St., S. F Elmore 

BROWN, RALPH, 5th and Tehama Sts., .-'. F B-M-F 

KAHN, I., Hotel Normandte, S, F Cole 

WILLIAMS. A. L., 729 Shotwell St.. S. F Overland 

DOLAN. W. A., 633 Van Ness Ave., s. F Kissel 

SHERMAN. CLAY & CO., S. F Packard ill 

TITUS, LOUIS, Union ar Sea View, Piedmont Ford 

DENMAN, DR. C. H., 2818 Russell St.. Berkeley Elmore 

ARENDT, J. N.. Pleasanton S-G-V 

BEST, C. L., E. 14th and Dutton, San Leandro National 

BOHN, J. A., 1621 7th Ave., Oakland Moon 

PRINGLE. .1. R., L236 Mer. Elx. Bldg., S. F Pathfinder 

CLEVENGER, G. II.. 3S1 Hawthorne Ave., Palo AH, S-G-V 

GRIBBLE, CHAS. II.. 111"'. Alameda Ave., San Jose Paige 

CASARETTO, LOUIS, Redwood city Regal 

JARVIS, MRS. J. 1'.. jxi Missouri St., s. F Oakland 

JARVIS, E. II.. 284 Missouri St.. s. F Oakland 

LONG. REV. GEO. I., 656 S. Oth St., San Jose Rambler 

MARKO. ARTHUR, Henry Aids.. S, P I 

TONNINGSEN, JNO.. St. Francis Hotel, S. F Barnes 

PACIFIC TEL. & TEL. CO., 268 13th St., 9. P Autocar 

NEWMAN. LESTER, 2480 Broadway, S. F ,C 

MILLER, A. «'., 316 California St., S. F Stutx 

CHRISTENS! >N. A., St. Francis Hotel, S. F Whlti 

NOTTINGHAM, NEWTON, 861 52d SI Oaklo i Courier 

SWALLF.Y, II. M., 5214 Dover St., Oakland Bverltt 

CARMAN, C. I'.. 1272 Charles St., Uameda National 

STEEVE, VS. E., 2S17 Atwell Ave., Prulrvale Cs 

THOMPSON. R. A., 2711 Regent St., Berkeley Ren 

HEARST. MRS. PHOEBE, Pleasanton i 

HUNTER, k., M., 311 Bank of San Jose Bldg.. San Fo Reo 

NEWELi.-.ui RDi "'is Ci > 20 17 Shattuck Ber! 

MARTIN-BOLSTER CO., Berkeley Ibbotl 

BERMING1IAM. W. N„ care Wells I ' Ford 

ADELBERG. K. v. 1035 Gearj St., S, F Mitchell 

BOWERS RUBBER WORKS, S.I" 

JONES. S. L., 1121 Polk St., S. P Oakland 

BRENNAN, WM, I . 2229 Fillmore St., S. F 

LEON, L. R.. 50 Sansome St, 9. 1* Elmore 

PORPORATO, .1 A., 619 Washington St.. S. F I 

WINTERMARK, GEO. W. J., 1218 Van Ness k,ve S. F Olds 

TURNBAl GH, COOK & CO.. Ml 16th St., Oakland 

ISAACS', M. P.. 5711 Oak Grove u. . Oakland Overland 

.-.ilil" Flanders 

ZOOK, E. T I Flanders 

WIN, R. I.. 10 Cherry St.. Petaluma Flanders 

GRANT. WM., Mer. Nat. Bank Bldg., S. F i 

BURTON. JAi losi Cadillac 

HILL. T. R.. 714 W. Julian St . Sail Jose Ford 

PACIFIC GAS & ELEC. CO.. S. F Loco 

FORERT1ER. MRS E. II.. 409 11th Ave.. S. F Flanders 

I.. A. soap CO., £60 Front St.. s. F Franklin 

MacKENZIE. A .1114 Linden St.. Oakland Rambler 

PAC. IIDYVr CO., S. F Oakland iSi 

CONNELLY, J. T.. 1480 Grove St., S. F Mercer 

SCHALTENBRANDT. I'll. 4051 20th St.. S, F Staver 

brain St., s. F Staver 

O'SHEA, JERRY, S F Staver 

TEOPLE, P, u ' 8 Iner. S. F Stoddard-Dayton 

iloss Av.-.. Oakland Overland 

EDWARDS. V nd 

Elmhiirsl Fonl 

RHODES, JAMISON ,\ Ford 

HILL, 1 I Mo 

BVANS M Parian.- 

ROUSTAN INO Columbia 

BERGNA. P. 944 E-M-F 

HARRIGAN-WEIDENMl'LLER CO., 345 Montgi 

S. F Alco 



BREW 13th and Franklin Si 

BREUNER CO., J., 13th and Franklin B( Oakland . 

sill, J. P., 3208 Grovt 

i. land 

H'OIIS, J, 1 

STEPHI 

EW1 116 1 ,lbi .i i Peta 

SLOSS, i i Willow SI . s in Jose 

SILVERSTINE, s. Mountain View 

SAN lost: CREAMERY. San Jose '. 

ORANG1 i. EA D ., m 

COSTERE, J., 211 \\ . Santa Clara St, an h Mlti 

» * • 

The latest reports, from the southern part of the State indi- 
cate that there is liable to be some opposition to the authority 
of the American Automobile Association. The recent action of 
the national body in suspending three of the prominent motor- 
ists of the South has caused the dealers to show signs of oppo- 
sition. There are rumors that the Southern automobilists are 
liable to withdraw from the A. A. A. and proceed to control 
and run their own events. They did this a few years ago very 
successfully, and they only recognized the A. A. A. through 
the solicitation of some of the prominent members who had 
been asked by the factories they represented to recognize the 
authority of the A. A. A. 

The Pacific Coast has always felt that it was able to govern 
itself in all matters of sports and pastimes. That this is the 
case is emphatically shown in the athletic world, where the 
Coast branch of the American Athletic Union rules its own 
members. The result is, that California stands next to New 
York State in the number of registered athletes. 

That this local government is a success is being shown in 
the Olympic games in Stockholm, where the California mem- 
bers of the American team are making world's records. 

California has the fastest automobile course in the world 
and some of the best drivers. In the number of motor cars 
owned and registered, it is only outnumbered by New York. 
Taking all these facts into consideration, there is no reason 
why, if the motorists of the Coast see fit, there should not be 
a local governing body, which could as satisfactorily control 
automobile racing and automobile contests as successfully as 
if it were sanctioned by the A. A. A. 

The A. A. A. is merely an inheritance of the old League of 




Be Wise ! 

-Use^ 
Shawnuit 

Tires. 



The Tires That Have Proved Best 



Territory open for 
a few active agents 



Write today 



Tansey-Crowe Auto Supply 

345 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 



American Wheelmen. Many of the salaried officials of the 
A. A. A. were officials of the wheeling organization, and it was 
under similar conditions like the present that the death knell 
of the L. A. W. was sounded. 

The officers of the L. A. W. in the East tried to dictate to the 
Pacific Coast, and especially to California, in matters concern- 
ing wheeling. The friction brought to life the organization 
known as the Associated Cyclists. 

California was producing the swiftest wheelmen, and the 
promoters throughout the country, and in fact throughout the 
world, recognized this and threw over the authority of the 
L. A. W. in preference to losing these fast men as drawing 
cards for their meets. 

There undoubtedly is a necessity for a national governing 
body, but the lines on which the A. A. A. is organized is alto- 
gether too despotic. The whole workings of the A. A. A. are 
governed by a coterie in New York. Year after year they suc- 
ceed themselves in a way that practically makes the A. A. A. 
a close corpoiation. 

The only solution to the present difficulty will be found in 
an organization similar to the Amateur Athletic Union, in which 
sections govern themselves according to rules laid down by the 
parent body at the annual meetings. These annual meetings 
are the court of last resort to which it is always possible to 
take an appeal from the action of the local bodies. It has been 
found through experience that few cases have necessitated 
any action by those at the annual meetings, and that the local 
governing bodies have always been able to handle local con- 
ditions successfully. 

This has done away with the friction which is now apparent 
locally in motordom, and has given a support to the national 
body that has given it the support and attention of all similar 
foreign associations, which has not been the case with the 
A. A. A., as was seen when the Automobile Club of America 
threw down the gauntlet to the A. A. A. and the latter was 
passed up by the foreign national body. 

If the A. A. A. continues to rule on the lines of "That it is It," 
there is no question but what the Pacific Coast will break away 



-m&ssm/jM&m 




"Always There" 
SPLITDORF SERVICE goes arm In arm with 
SPLITDORF IGNITION— and has been a continuous 
SPLITDORF POLICY for more than two decades. 
From the earliest days of colls and plugs and 
through every stage of Ignition service, SPLIT- 
DORF ha^ been synonymous with SERVICE. 
If YOU DO NOT BENEFIT from this SERVICE, 
the fault Is your own. Our experts are at your call 
— our branches, which are miniature factories In 
equioment, are scattered throughout the country 
and our inflexible rule Is — "SATISFY THE CUS- 

Comc to us with your Ignition troubles— we will 
gladly shoulder all responsibilities for changes and 
adjustments and guarantee the greatest satis- 
faction. 

Write for our "Racing Record" 

Splitdorf Electrical Company 

Ain -ii. v v « P,cif,c Co * 8 ' Br " ch 

430-36 V»n Ness \ve. Sun Francisco 



£ 



I 




from its authority, and organize an association of its own, as 
was done years ago in the case of the wheelmen. 

* * * 
Vancouver, B. C, representatives will combine with the 
Third Annual Convention of the Pacific Highway Association 
on its run with the annual tour to Seattle to attend the "Pot- 
latch," and those who find time will continue on to this city. 
It is expected that a hundred British Columbia cars will make 



The 




Car 



and Absolute Motor Satisfaction Are Synonymous 




4-CYLINDER 



On the road 
In power 



AND 6-CYLINDER 

PASSES THEM ALL" 

In flexibility Up the hill 



In equipment 



In speed 



In silence 
In finish 



AND 



THE PRICE IS RIGHT 

Send for Pleasure or Commercial Catalogs 

RELIANCE AUTOMOBILE CO. 

342-352 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 



Ask for a Demonstration 



July 13, 1912. 



and Califoi nia Advertiser 



27 



the start from Vancouver, and go as far as Seattle, althout 
that number will be greatly reduced when the run is continue J 
southward, as most of the Canadians will not find the time to 
make as long a trip as the San Francisco tour. 

Invitations have been sent out from the Association's head- 
quarters to the counties through which the Pacific Highway 
passes, asking the boards of County Commissioners and Super- 
visors in the States of Washington, Oregon and California to 
send a delegate representing them to this convention. There 
is no question but what a great many of these public bodies will 
accept this invitation, as the success of the Pacific Coast High- 
way project during the past two years has been largely due to 
the efficient co-operation rendered by the county officials in 
charge of road building in their respective districts. 

• * * 

"Few realize the vast economy of the motor vehicle. The 
automobile has ceased to be a thing of the luxury class," says 
Henry L. Hornberger, Pacific Coast manager of the Oakland 
Motor Company. 

"The motor "car to-day is being purchased for its great value 
from an economy standpoint. The man of wealth who has his 
home in the country saves almost his living expenses between 
the taxes paid in the city and in the country. 

"He saves time that can hardly be measured in dollars and 
cents, for his automobile makes it possible for him to handle 
his business with a scope that before the coming of the auto- 
mobile was impossible. 

"The limitations of business engagements are ten times as 
great as heretofore. It makes it possible for him to handle en- 
terprises that for the lack of time before the coming of the 
motor car he could not consider. 

"Heretofore he had to travel by traction car, railway or 
horses, with an inconvenience that was not conducive to a 
frame of mind that gave him the power to grasp serenely busi- 
ness propositions with a successful force. 

"And so on down through every department of business, from 
the proprietor to the salesman and the drayage department, the 
automobile is showing its worth and economy, and it will not 
be long before not to own a motor vehicle will stamp one as not 

to be considered as a successful business man." 

• * * 

The Thomas B. Jeffery Co., of Kenosha, Wis., manufacturing 
the Rambler car, has donated $1,000 to the fund of $6,000 now 
being raised by the Kenosha Automobile Club for the improve- 
ment of the Lake Shore road within Kenosha County. The club 
is working under a provision of the new highway law of Wis- 
consin which makes it compulsory for townships, the smallest 
unit of government, to raise a sum equal to that provided by any 
individual or individuals, for the improvement of any stated 
portion of any highway. The club has selected the Lake Shore 
road for improvement, and intends to force the expenditure 
of $18,000 on the highway by providing $6,000, obliging the 
township to provide $6,000, the $6,000 to be duplicated by 

county and State aid. 

• • • 

The Standard Motor Car Company has adopted a novel and 
effective means of displaying the motor in the Stoddard- 
Knight The hood which covers this engine is constructed en- 
tirely of heavy glass, set in a substantial metal frame, admitting 
of an excellent view of the cylinders, fan, magneto and car- 
bureter. Electric lights concealed beneath the hood permit of 
the motor being seen in operation at night. Much attention is 
being attracted wherever the car goes through this original 
method of showing the simplicity of the Knight motor without 

the need of raising the metal covering ordinarily used. 

• • • 

New York is to have a big speedway after all. It will be a 
two-mile circuit, located on the New Jersey Meadows, twelve 
minutes from downtown New York by the Hudson tubes. The 
course will be known as the Metropolitan Motor Speedway, and 
will be operated by the Metropolitan Motor Speedway Associa- 
tion. 

• • • 

Illinois bankers attending the annual convention of group 1, 
Illinois State Bankers' convention, in Moline last week went 
squarely on record in favor of systematic road improvement, to 
be brought about by co-operation between inhabitants of the 
agricultural and commercial sections. 



Worth While 
Your Attention 

Regal Model T "25" Underslung Touring Car 

UNDER a thousand dollars — 
Twenty - five horse power- 
Comfortably seating five pas- 
sengers. A veritable challenge to 
competition. An "Underslung" 
with all the advantages of "safety," 
"economy," "beauty," "accessibility," 
"comfort" this costly construction 
assures. 

A Touring Car that will amaze you by 
its ability, its flexibility and its absolute 
sufficiency for any and every purpose 
—speed— endurance — hill climbing. 

Compare it— Match it — Value against 
Value. 

Let the car do justice to the good 
things we haven't said about it. 

Some Specifications: 



Motor, 25 H. P., 33/4x41/2 Inches; 
Wheel Base, 106 Inches; Mag- 
neto and Batteries (dual Igni- 
tion); Transmission (Selective) 
Highest Grade Nickel Steel, 3 
speeds forward, one reverse; 
Morgan & Wright Tires 32x3/ 2 



Inches; Standard Equipment, 
Five Lamps; Generator; Horn; 
Complete Tool Equipment (Fold- 
ing Glass Windshield and Mo- 
hair Top and Top Boot, $50 ex- 
tra.) 




$950 

The Regal "25" Underslung Touring Car 

REGAL MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

Automobile Manufacturers, DETROIT, MICH. 
San Francisco and Oakland Agents 

Frank O. Renstrom Company 



(THE HOUSE OF SERVICE) 



Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves. 
Twelfth and Jackson Sts. 



San Francisco, Cal. 
Oakland, Cal. 



Dealers Everywhere 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 



Net sales gain 211% 

over corresponding ten 

months of previous year 



"NOT SILENT" — but, "a 
noise so faint one can scarce 
distinguish it from silence." 




G;l Spear 



'American Tourist" (Type 34 A) $2350— fully equipped 



1913 



AMERICAN 

/yunderslungI 1 



1913 



The "American Traveler" (Type 56A) $4500 
Six passengers. Wheel base 140 in.: tires, 
41.*4*« in.; front and rear on demountable 
rims. Sprinss — front 40 in.; rear 54 in. 

$4500 includes the following equipment — 
Combination electric lighting dynamo and 
self-starter, all five lamps electric, $90 War- 
ner clock combination 100 mile speedometer; 
fine plate glass windshield: fine mohair top 
and curtains; high tension magneto and stor- 
age battery; two extra rims; shock abBOrbers; 
foot rest; robe rail; horn, jack, tools and tire- 
repair outfit. 



The "American Tourist" (Type 34A) $2350. 

Four passengers. Wheel base 118 in.; tires 
.17x4 in.; front and rear on Q. D. demountable 
rims. 

$2350 includes following equipment — Elec- 
tric light dynamo outfit complete with gener- 
ator and storage battery supplying five 
lamps; $50 Warner speedometer: fine plate 
glass windshield; Disco self-starter; fine 
mohair top and curtains; high tension mag- 
neto and storage battery; one extra rim; 
shock absorber: robe rail; foot rest: horn, 
jack, tools and tire-repair outfit. 



The "American Scout" (Type 22A) $1475. 

Strictly a two-passenger car. Wheel base 
105 in.; tires 36x314 In.: front and rear on Q. 
D. demountable rims. 

$1475 includes following equipment — $50 
Warner speedometer; Disco sell-starter: 
electric dash and tail light Bupplled by a 
large storage battery; gas head lights sup- 
plied by Prest-O-Llte gas tank; One 
top and curtains; high tension magneto and 
battery: one extra rim; combination 
circular tire holder and luggage box; horn, 
jaek. tools and tire-repair outfit. 



FOR the season of 1913 we announce our three 
famous standard models: The "American Trav- 
eler," at $4500; the "American Tourist" at 
$2350; the "American Scout" at $1475. All fully 
equipped. 

Eight years ago the first "American Underslung" 
was placed on the market. Its builders had a new idea 
in automobile construction. That is, they took the old 
practical Underslung principle as applied to all modem 
locomotives, and built the "American Underslung" 
around it. Its introduction marked the first actual ad- 
vancement in fine motor car construction. 

From that day to this the enthusiastic and eager de- 
mand for this car has always exceeded our capacity, 
although each year our production was greatly en- 
larged. During the last ten months alone our increase 
over the corresponding ten months of a year ago has 
been over 211 per cent. 

The "American Underslung" differs in constructive 
principle. The frame — the very backbone of the car — 
is slung under the axles instead of being placed over 
the axles, and the result is that the very drawbacks of 



the conventional "overhead" car are completely elimi- 
nated. 

The low center of gravity means SAFETY and 
added comfort. 

The straight line drive means less wasted power. 

The large wheels mean easier riding, tire economy 
and maximum road clearance. 

The Underslung frame permits the direct and practi- 
cal introduction of all these distinct advantages. 

And on top of these guaranteed practical advantages 
you have a superb and gracefully designed car possess- 
ing a most elegant finish. These big, strong, powerful 
cars are beauties. They are just as fine as we can make 
them. The exquisite body work is magnificent. Every 
"American Underslung" is as carefully made as a 
special job. 

This year we are equipping the "American Under- 
slung" with the finest accessories made. It is all in 
keeping with the elegance of the splendid new models. 
Nothing has been too good for us to secure, and all is 
made regular equipment — not "as extras." "American 
Underslungs" are known as the fully equipped cars. 

Our complete 1913 line can be seen in all of the prin- 
cipal cities. Write us for a handsome 1913 catalogue 
and a simple treatise on the "Advantages of Under- 
slung Construction." 



AMERICAN MOTORS CO., Indianapolis, Ind. 

AMERICAN MOTORS CALIFORNIA CO. 



476 Golden Gate Avenue 



San Francisco, Cal. 



July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



Marking the end of needlessly high prices for motor cars of 
the highest grade, the Stoddard-Dayton headquarters in this 
city have inaugurated a vigorous selling campaign, and are at- 
tempting to prove that $2,950 is the maximum price it is neces- 
sary to pay for an automobile of the finest design, material and 
workmanship. 

"The judicious automobile buyer will recognize that it is 
utter extravagance to pay more than $2,950 for a poppet valve 
motor, now that the Silent Knight type has become a standard," 
said H. E. Maslin, vice-president and general manager of the 
Standard Motor Car Company. "The public has a proper and 
consistent notion of the prices that should be paid for motor 
cars, and we believe we exactly meet that idea in the Stoddard- 
Dayton Saybrook. 

"This car should establish the sum of $2,950 as the point 
where the limit of prudent buying ends and extravagance be- 
gins. From the earliest days of the industry there has been a 
strong feeling that prices of the very high grade cars were 
needlessly high, and that it would only be a question of time 
when some manufacturer would achieve sufficient economy in 
engineering, purchasing, manufacturing and selling to meet 
the highest ideals at a reasonable price. 

"In the Saybrook model of the Stoddard-Dayton, the United 
States Motor Company believes that it has come nearest to the 
popular idea of quality cars, and that the great class of buyers 
who want the best in motors of standard design will quickly 
give evidence of how they feel on the price question. 

"The Stoddard-Dayton shops in Dayton, Ohio, have built 
high grade cars exclusively for the past seven years, and great 
strides in scientific production have been made since the affilia- 
tion, two years ago, with the United States Motor Company, 
the largest organization in the automobile industry. By con- 
centrating and co-ordinating every activity in production the 
company claims to have perfected manufacturing operations 
to an extent which now means an actual saving to the buyers. 

"Everything in the Saybrook model, for example, is stand- 
ard — a design which has stood the test of years — and in addi- 
tion to the fine body building for which the Dayton shops are 
famous, there are countless little perfections which mean com- 
fort and economy to owners." 



Oftentimes motorists seem to think that no care is neces- 
sary in carrying spare tires, according to a Michelin expert. 
Uncovered envelopes are tossed on roofs of limousines where 
sun and rain beat upon them. Unprotected inner tubes are 
thrown carelessly into tool boxes, where they come in contact 
with sharp tools. Needless to say, such practices are destruc- 
tive. Strong light is very injurious to rubber. So, likewise, is 
heat. For these reasons, if no other, spares should be kept in 
cases. Moisture and oil are also injurious to tires. Water- 
proof wrappers which keep out light, moisture and oil, and at 
the same time protect spares from injury by contact with sharp 
substances, can be had of any accessory dealer. Every motor- 
ist should use them. Cardboard boxes are never satisfactory 
for carrying tubes in a car. Every vibration of the car causes 
chaffing between the box and tube, and since cardboard is 
harder than rubber, the tubes will inevitably be injured. Covers 
for inner tubes should take the form of bags which will fit 
snugly arounc. the tube. 



Flint, Mich., is now holding the largest gathering of automo- 
bile agents, branch managers and distributors ever seen in that 
city. From Boston, Mass., to the Pacific Coast, every agency 
of the Buick Automobile Company is represented by an author- 
ized agent. 

In this gathering is R. K. Roberts, manager of the Howard 
Automobile Company, a still stubborn fighter who gets stand- 
offs after standoffs, but keeps pegging away at the factory un- 
til he usually gets what he wants, but when he asks for a con- 
tract this season, the head of the Buick factory is apt to lose 
his breath, for the train loads of the past season will not be a 
circumstance to what the preparations are for 1913. 

Having completed his business with the Buick factory, Mr. 
Roberts will then proceed to Indianapolis, and have the re- 
mainder of his confab with the National factory, and come 
home with pockets bulging with contracts from the best auto- 
mobile factories in the world. 




Baker Electric 



The luxurious, dignified car. 

Pre-eminently the car "de luxe." 

Its beauty of design appeals to the 
most discriminating taste. 

Its appointments are elegant and 
refined. 

Its social prestige is well established. 

It is the only American electric that 
meets the advanced engineering 
standards of Europe. 

It has the largest mileage radius 
with the lowest consumption of cur- 
rent and lowest cost of upkeep. 



Standard Motor Car Co. 



Electric Rooms 



571 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco 



12th and Madison Sts. 

Oakland 



1001 So. Olive Street 

Los Angeles 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 



REDUCE YOUR TIRE EXPENSE 
BY USING 

TIRES 

Guaranteed for 5,000 
Miles Speedometer Reading 

This is a bona fide guarantee, same as 
issued by other Tire Companies, but gives 
you 1500 miles more service. This alone 



is a 



30% Saving 



Prices same as all guaranteed tires. 

WRITE FOR OUR BOOKLET OR FURTHER INFORMATION 

Hughson & Merton 

PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS 

530 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco 

Los Angeles Portland Seattle— 924 E Pike St 



WHEN BUYING 

RAJAH SPARK PLUGS 

"INSIST ON THE GENUINE" 

Don't accept cheap imitations — spark plugs similar 

in appearance but made of cheap material 

and construction. 

SEE THAr THE SHELL AND PORCELAIN IS STAMPED 

" RAJAH " 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS, 

Hughson & Merton, inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 



Dr. W. T. Burks, County Health Officer of Fresno, drove his 
Chalmers "36" car from Fresno City, where the temperature 
was 105 in the shade, into two feet of snow in five hours and 
50 minutes. "The last 20 miles of going," said the doctor, "was 
the hardest test of an automobile that I have ever made in the 
past ten years. The grades were terrific, and the melting snow 
had transformed the roads into lakes of mud and slush. We 
had to use chains all of this distance to keep from slipping off 
the grade, and to get traction. I consider the most remarkable 
part of the performance lies in the fact that our radiator did not 
require filling for the entire trip, and not once did the water 
boil. We were repeatedly called upon to use the low gear, 
which, to people familiar with the power of the Chalmers '36' 

means we were doing some work. 

* t * 

The automobile firm that cannot give its dealers cars fast 
enough is the envy of the business, and there are only a few of 
them in this predicament. When it comes to automobile parts, 
over-demand accentuates doubly the merit of the goods, ,and 
very seldom, indeed, is such a case ever noted. An instance 
is reported, however, from Camden, Maine, where P. H. 
Thomas, local representative of the Republic Staggard Tread 
Tire, has been forced to send out the S. O. S. to the home fac- 
tory to avoid being shipwrecked by the~rush of business. Rough 
roads in his territory show up very quickly the quality of tires, 
and Mr. Thomas considers this tremendous increase in his busi- 
ness a particularly valuable testimonial of merit. 

* * » 

The Motor Equipment Company, of Oakland, is now estab- 
lished at Broadway and Twenty-second streets. A full supply 
of automobile accessories will be carried in stock. Kelly- 
Racine tires and demountable rims will be furnished owners of 
cars on short notice. Vulcanizing will also be taken care of 
by the Motor Equipment Company. 

* * * 

Followers of road races have been watching with some curi- 
osity the outcome of some unusual entries in one of the early 
events this year. The concern involved is one of the largest 
ones in the country, and it has been asserted that the Contest 
Board of the American Automobile Association would not take 
any action in the matter. This has been denied by men in a 
position to know the facts, and it is declared that a most search- 
ing investigation is now under way. 

* * * 

Joseph Tracy and H. F. Donaldson, the consulting engineers, 
have removed their offices from Thirty-ninth street to the new 
United States Rubber building at Broadway and 58th street, 
New York. The headquarters of the Society of Automobile 
Engineers have also been removed to the same building, which 
is farthest north among New York's skyscrapers. 

* • * 

With new board saucer motorcycle tracks in operation at 
Brighton Beach, Newark and Philadelphia, the East will soon 
have an opportunity to watch the flying two wheelers. The 
Newark track is four laps to the mile, but is likely to be quite 
as fast as any in the country, as its banking is very steep. 



O-TAK-A TIRE REMOVER 

Acts on the Rings, the Rims, the Tires 

One Minute 
Instead of 
two hours ^V'^Vf^^Ti J M 




$5.00 

Special price for ten days S3. 50 
Adjustable to any size tire 
LIVE AGENTS WANTED 

The ' 'O-TAK-A" is the only perfect device on the market lor removing and 
replacing tires. With it you can Instantly remove any tire, no matter how 
rusted, frozen or stuck from any cause. 

With demountable rims tires can be removed and tubes replaced quicker 
than rimscan be replaced. The "O-TAK-A" is guaranteed to do all that Is 
claimed for it and to give perfect satisfaction or money refunded. 

If your dealer cannot supply you, send to 

A. HAMBURGER & SONS 

BROADWAY. EIGHTH AND HILL STS. LOS ANGELES. CAL. 



July 13, 1912. 



and Californ a Advertiser 



31 



Frank 0. Renstrom Company, agent for the Regal and Kline 
Kars, are in receipt of a letter from the Regal factory announ- 
cing the valuable addition to their plant of the services of C. 
S. Young, as assistant general manager. 

As the designer of the Lozier's latest models and possessed 
of an experience covering a period of fourteen years, Mr. Young 
will take with him to the Regal Company a knowledge of motor 
cars and their construction that is equaled by but few men in 
the industry. Previous to his connection with the Lozier people 
he occupied positions of responsibility with such firms as the 
Electric Vehicle Company, Pope Manufacturing Company, and 
the automobile department of the American Locomotive Com- 
pany. His association with the automobile industry dates back 
to the early days, and his experiments along scientific lines 
have done much to place the manufacture of motor cars on its 

present basis. 

* * * 

Taking with them a new Stoddard-Dayton touring car, W. J. 
Fisher and L. H. Fisher, prominent merchants of Tacoma, 
Wash., accompanied by their wives, sailed from New York 
recently for Europe, for an all-summer tour of the Continent. 
Every country in which motor travel is popular will be visited 
by the Fishers. They bought the new automobile in Tacoma 
and had it delivered to them in New York. 




U.S. PAT. OFF 



STANDS AT THE HEAD OF BRAKE LININGS 

Has highest coefficient of friction. Heat-proof, oil- 
proof, gasolene-proof and practically wear-proof 



^JOL^i^^tO-hy F<EG.U,S PAT.DFF: 



Every foot of RAYBESTOS is stamped with our trade-mark. This 

protects you and your car. 
We also mike Duplex and Raymond Brakes and Gyrex Mixer. 
THE ROYAL EQUIPMENT CO., Bridgeport, Conn. 

CHANSLOR & LYON MOTOR SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 



San Francisco 



Pacific Coast Distributors 
Los Adfeles Spokane Fresno Seattle Portland 



Save Repairs 



Save Money 



Save Trouble 



by replacing worn out Bearingrs with the world re- 
nowned HESS-BRIGHTS. All sizes carried In stock 




Pacific Coast Distributors 

Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co., Inc. 

H. D. McCOY. Sec. & Treas 
Los Angeles San Francisco Seattle Fresno Portland Spokane 



Rex Metal Cream 

The King Polish 

Not because It possesses any 
one particular advantage but 
because It possesses all— some 
of them exclusive. 



REX METAL CREAM gives 
maximum service. It goes further 
and gives a more brilliant and dur- 
able polish than inv other polish 
on the market. It never scratches 
the metal er injures the hands 

For Sale By 
ALL JOBBERS 




TIRE RELIABILITY 

Can Be Secured By Using Woodworth Treads 




Woodworth 
TreadP cannot 1 
loose to chafe and heat 
the tire. The coil springs 
Instantly take up any 
stretch In the leather. 
iiently the tires are 
never chafed or heated. 
Good tires used always 
with Woodworth 
Will last at least three 
times ae long as when run 
hare, and at the same 
time the user will be pro- 
tected from punctures 
and skidding. 

Even the best makes of 
tires are not safe from 
injuries when run bare, 
but good tires protected 
by Woodworth Treads 
will be practically proof 
against trouble of any 
kind until the treads wear 
out; for Woodworth 
Treads will give protec- 
tion from wear. cuts, 
bruises and similar in- 
juries, from the action of 
oil, from skidding which 
scuffs off the rubber, and 
in fact from all Injuries 
which can be caused to 
the tire by the road or 
objects in the road. 

Send for 1912 catalog 
showing the reduced 
prices and free booklet on 
the Preservation of Tires. 



Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co., Inc. 



Los Angeles 
Seattle 



San Francisco 
Fresno 



Portland 
Spokane 



NO PASSING NOVELTY 

The "Gabriel" has Come to Stay 




It Is the most useful signal possible. So simple, so musical, so sure, 
so safe. It's blown by the exhaust gas of the motor, thus eliminat- 
ing all upkeep expense. The Gabriel is the most economical and 
durable signal. 




Gabriel Automatic 
Wind Shield Cleaner 



need to worry for fear of run- 
llng over some person during rain 
and snow storms If your wind shield 
is fitted with a Gabriel Automatic Cleaner, for it enables the driver 
to see the road, and it's not necessary to slacken speed to operate It. 

GET A FOUR NOTE 




TRUMPET HORN, and you'll have something attractive and out 
of the ordinary. * 111 

Pacific Coast Distributors: 

Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co., Inc. 

Sin Francisco Los Angeles Portland Seattle Spokane Fresno 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 



DISCO Self -Starters 

Over Thirty Thousand in Service 

Adopted by Forty American and Five European Factories. 
Can be fitted to and will make any car Self-Starting in a few 
hours' time. INSIST ON A 



DISCO 



IMPORTANT— Owners of Ford, Buick, and 
other cars not equipped with priming cup: — We 
now furnish without extra cost special two-way 
guaranteed Starter Spark Plugs, making these 
cars as easy to equip as any other with the Disco 



WE WANT LIVE AGENTS IN YOUR TERRITORY. WRITE FOR 
PARTICULARS 

DISCO PACIFIC COMPANY 

603 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 



THE CHAMPION WIND SHIELD 

IS GUARANTEED 




Glass Fronts For All Types of Automobiles 



HIGHEST QUALITY 



GREATEST STRENGTH 



Champion Wind Shield Mfg. Co. 



Eddy and Larkin Sts. 



San Francisco 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Call on us when you want photographs of any kind. 
We car. and will please you. Our new studio, the 
largest west of New York, covers 9,000 square feet of 
floor space and Is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. Tou are cordially Invited to call and 
we will be very glad to take you through the different 
departments, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging, 
Kodak, etc. Tou will be Interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO., 
Everything In Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phones— Franklin 1184. Home C 4084 



^T Motor I 



Motor Cars 



Active preparations are going ahead for the reception of the 
delegates who motor to San Francisco to attend the Third An- 
nual Convention of the Pacific Highway Association on August 
Sth, 6th and 7th, according to announcements that have been 
made by the Motor Car Dealers' Association of San Francisco. 

W. L. Hughson, a member of the Executive Board of that 
Association, has been appointed chairman of a special com- 
mittee to receive visitors who will go to the California metropo- 
lis for this International Highway Convention. 

The Sacramento Chamber of Commerce will also entertain 
the Northern delegates as they pass through the Capital City. 
It is expected that a stop of an entire day will be made, prob- 
ably on August 2d or third, at Sacramento, and a delegation 
will be arranged to go out from San Francisco to meet the visi- 
tors and assist the Sacramento Chamber of Commerce in their 
entertainment. 

The first party to leave the North will be headed by Judge 
J. T. Ronald, President of this Association, leaving Seattle 
Monday, July 22d. A day will be spent in Portland, and prob- 
ably one or two other short stops will be made before Sacra- 
mento is reached. 

The plans of the delegates who will motor from San Diego 
and Los Angeles to San Francisco are not as well defined, be- 
cause of the fact that they only have to cover slightly more 
than half the distance that the Northern motorists will tour. 

* * * 

"Show me a man," said Calvin C. Eib, manager of the Pio- 
neer Automobile Company, "who uses his brakes properly, and 
in nine cases out of ten I will show you a man who runs his car 
with the least expense. The act of stopping a car is as much of 
an art as anything else. Every day you see a man come tearing 
up the street at thirty miles an hour, shut off power, put on 
brakes, and slide five or ten feet before bringing his machine 
to a stop. This is not only doing the car a serious injustice, but 
you can almost figure out the cost of rubber that he has used. 

"Paradoxically speaking, the way to use brakes is to so judge 
your distance and speed that you practically coast up to the 
point where you wish to stop, and a mere touch will bring the 
car to a stand-still at the proper point. Any high-grade car will 
hold itself going down hill on compression, the driver using 
either high, intermediate, second or low, according to the grade 
and character of the road, and then regulating the speed by 
gently touching the emergency brake from time to time. By 
doing this, the brakes of a car are kept in perfect condition for 
an emergency, and they neither heat nor wear. 

"Another place where brakes are frequently used and cause 
damage is on slippery streets and grades, and if the brakes are 
applied at the time the car is being turned, the danger of skid- 
ding is increased one hundred per cent. One should always 
have the car under control before a turn is reached." 

* « • 

Al. Posner, E. Bodefeld and Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Wienecke ar- 
rived in San Francisco from Fresno last week in Mr. Posner's 
Chalmers "36," having made the run in 6 hours and 45 minutes 
by way of Merced, Modesto and Livermore. Mr. Posner states 
that they had a delightful trip, the roads being good all the 
way, with the exception of a short distance just going into 
Banta, where the road was plowed up for the distance of a mile. 
Dublin Pass, he states, is the best he has ever seen. The party 
remained in San Francisco over the Fourth, and returned to 
Fresno by way of Santa Cruz. 

* » * 

The first official entry for the Vanderbilt Cup this year is 
Ralph Mulford's six-cylinder Knox. Mulford, while on his 
way to Tacoma, Wash., to drive the Knox in the Montamara 
Fiesta, Free-for-All, July 6th, stopped off to inspect the course 
at Milwaukee. He was more than pleased with the track, and 
predicted that much faster time would be made this year than 
in any previous Vanderbilt Cup race. 



The Thomas 8. Jeffery Company of California, 285 Geary Street, San Francisco 

FOR SALE — 1910 Wlnton Automobile. Perfect condition, fully equipped. 
Warner Speedometer: top; glass front; clock; tire Irons; trunk rack; 
Prest-o-Lite tank: electric and oil lamps: two horns — bulb and electric; 
two tire covers; two extra tires; two extra tubes. Address: Owner, 21 
Sutter St. 'Phone Kearny 3594. 

FOR SALE. — Autocar Runabout, with top. lamps and generator In rood 
condition. Price $150. Apply 21 Sutter street 




MOTZ Cushion Tires 

For Pleasure Cars and Light Delivery Cars 



Si I 



for Paiiipli! 



141 



The Motz Tire and Rubber Co., 



» Executive Office: Akron, Ohio 

BRANCHES: 2B23 Michigan Ave. Chicago; 1737 Broadway. New York. N. Y. : 
—Show* double, notched tread* 1409 Race St., Philadelphia: 999 Woodward Ave., Detroit. MiYtr 

-Shows undercut aides 409 E. 15th St., Kansas City. Mo.:2.l5i Euclid Ave , Cleveland' 

-Show* slantwise bridges Ohio; Standard Tire & Rubber Co.. IM-106 Portland St.. 

—Shows absorbing means when Boston, Mass., Distributor* for the New England States, 

passing over an obstruction 



July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



33 



Mosier 



are the best 
A.R.MoslerfirCo. 



NEW YORK. N. Y. 



Western Representative 

ALFRED H.COATES 

444 Market Street 

San Francisco 

Cal. 



Guarantee 

630 Van Ness Ave. 

Phone Franklin 2772 

"Eltoe" BATTERIES 

Batteries Charged and 

Overhauled 

Automobile Wiring 

Electric Accessories 

Elect robola Head and 

Side-Lights 

Coil Repairing 



Battery Co. 

162 5 Pacific Ave. 

PHONES: 
Franklin 1510 C 4760 

High Grade 

ELECTRIC 
VEHICLE 
GARAGE 

Expert Exclusive 

Electrical Vehicle Charging 

and Repairing 



ST. FRANCIS GARAGE 

Under the Management of the 

FRANCIS BROS. AUTO RENTAL CO. 

Announce the Opening of One of the Finest and Moat 
Up-To-Date Garages in the City. 

Conveniently located POST STREET, bet. Polk and Van Ness 

Phone Sutter 1010 

Thoroughly Fire-Proof, Situated in a Class A Building 

Inspection Invited 1912 6-CYLINDER PEERLESS FOR HIRE 



Expert Automobile Washing and Polishing 
By SKILLED Workmen 

Only the very best automobile soaps, 
new and clean sponges and chamois 
used. Day Service a Specialty. 



E. R. WOLFKIEL, v ° n Ness Ave. .1 Golden Gate Ave. 
Phone Franklin 2399 



A. B. C. 

Anti-Puncture Tire Fluid 

will positively stop punctures 
in your tire. Eliminates all 
trouble such as nails, tacks 
and slow leaks. 
Guaranteed not to rot or injure the tube. 'Will 
outlast the tire. Costs $7.50 for tires 34x4 or 
under, or $10.00 for tires 34x4 or larger. 

Call at 60S Van Ness Ave. for Demonstration 
JAMES BOGUE. Sales Manager 




AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States. Canada and Europe 

AETNA INSURANCE CO. 

OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH— 325 California Street. San Francisco 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 
CYPRESS LODGE, BELMONT.— Phone Belmont 111. Touring Informa- 
tion. Mwals at all hours. Our specialty, steaks and broils, cold lunches. 
Private dining rooms. Thoroughly equipped b 
NELSON & JOHNSON. Propr. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Oarage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladles In connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and SL James Sts. 

SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 76 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

SAN JOSE.— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE, Market and SL James 
street. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire-proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler, Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE. 443 Emmerson St. Tel., P. A. 
333. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries in stock. Gasoline, oil, 
repairing, lathe work, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 

PALO ALTO.— LARKIN'S CAFE— .lust opened. The only strictly first- 
class cafe on the Wishbone Route devoted to the patronage of automobile 
owners and their tamilies. Corner of University avenue and The Circle. 

GILROY.— "FOWLER'S" GARAGE, North Main St. Phone 1163. Rent 
cars at all hours. Tires and sundries in stock; gasoline, oil, repairing, 
lathe work, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 
SANTA CRUZ.— CENTRAL GARAGE; autos for hire; general repairing; 
cars stored. Phone S. C. 446. 25-27-29 Socjuel Ave. BEACH GARAGE, 
cor. First and Cliff Sts. Phone S. C. 552. Opposite Casa Del Rey. E. A. 
Noyes & Son, Props. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 
SAN LUIS OBISPO.— CALIFORNIA GARAGE. A. Luchessa, Proprie- 
tor. Dealer in Automobiles and Bicycles. Repairs and supplies. Every- 
thing complete. Building fire-proof. 879-881 Hlguera St., San Luis 
Obispo, Cal. I'none 789 R. 

LAKE COUNTY. 
LAKEPORT.— LAKEPORT GARAGE. Vulcanizing, batteries charge!. 
Gasoline and lubricants. First-class machine work. One block from 
Postofflce. F. E. Watkins, Prop. Phone Main 621. 

SONOMA COUNTY. 
HEALDSBURG.— FITCH MOUNTAIN GARAGE. Robinson & Groshong, 
Props. F. L. Robinson, Phone 221 J. Sid Groshong, Phone 220 J; General 
rent and garage service. First class auto repair work; full line of supplies. 

GUERNEVILLE.— GUERNEV1LLE GARAGE. Automobiles for hire. 
Gasoline, oils and automobile supplies. Main street, Guerneville, in rear 
of City Livery Stables. Phone Main 163. R. N. Tunstall, Prop. 

CLOVERDALE.— WARREN'S GARAGE. Geo. F. Warren, Prop. Fully 
equipped blacksmith and machine shop, Studebaker headquarters; tires in 
stock; supplies and repairs. Upper West St., Cloverdale. Phone Main 221. 

SANTA ROSA. — Houts Auto Co., Mendocino Ave., one-half block north 
of Court House. Expert automobile repairing, supplies, tires, oils and 
gasoline. Open day and night. Telephone 627. Agents Overland, Stod- 
dard-Dayton, Kissel -Kar. 

PETALUMA.-PETALU1U GARAGE. Sparks & Murphy, Proprietors. 
General machine work. Supplies, repairing and auto livery; lubricating 
ails and gasoline. Corner Third and C streets. Tel. Petaluma 3. 



LAKE COUNTY 
HIGHLAND SPRINGS.— Garage, gasoline (30c 
machine work. Phone, Highland Springs. 
of automobilists. Meals at all hours. 



per gallon), oils, light 
Special attention to comfort 




Model »8. $1750 



THE MARION 

Marion Motors Co. 

489 Golden Gate Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Firestone 

TIRES AND DEMOUNTABLE RIMS 
THE FIRESTONE TIRE AND RUBBER CO. Cor. Via Nesj ind Fultou. Sao Frsociico 



MONAMODILE 

That ONE Best Oil 

251 Minna St., San Francisco. Phone Sutter 2031 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 



MoToRoL 



'"It suits because it doesn't soot' 



If you want to prolong the life 
of your engine. 

If you want to eliminate smoke 
and carbon, 

If you want to reduce your oil 
expense, 

Use MoToRoL. 



Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



GOODRICH 
TIRES 



BEST IN THE 
LONG RUN 



THE B. F. GOODRICH 
CO., of California 

556-5S8 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco 



"HOOVER" 

AUXILIARY SPRING & 

SHOCK ABSORBER 



Full factory equipment on all Pack- 
ards, Oldsmoblles. Coles. Thomas and 
Seven others. Absolutely perfect. 
Full set of four— $14 to $18. Under 
compression by heavy loads, rough 
roads or bumps. Under all conditions 
rides as easy as on asphalt. Impos- 
sible to break springs. No Competition 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 
Polk and Fulton Sts., San Francisco 



GOODYEAR 

NO RIM CUT 

TIRES 



Factory Branch 

THE GOODYEAR TIRE AND 

RUBBER CO. 

361-363 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 



EXPERT 
AUTOMOBILE 
PAINTING 



P. J. KRUG 

425-431 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco 

Woodworking. Blacksmithine 

and every known repair for 

the automobile 

All Work Guaranteed 



KEENAN BROS. 



Machinists and Engineers 
Automobile Repairing a Specialty 

J50 Golden Gate Avenue, bet Hyde 

and Lai kin Streets 
Phones: Franklin 6833. Home J 201s 



PANHARD 
OIL 



FREE FROM CARBON 

L. H. & B. I. BILL 

543 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



VULCANIZING 



PEART & ELKINGTON 

Phone Market 6370 

42 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco, Cal. 



KELLY-RACINE 
TIRES 



Call and Investigate 

CHANSLOR & LYON MOTOR 
SUPPLY CO. 

501 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 



FISK TIRES 



'•THE STANDARD OF QUALITY" 

Made to fit all style rims 

For Sale by all Dealers 



Why Don't You Try Our 

UN-GUARANTEED 

GIBRALTAR 

TIRES 



Others have and find it gives as 

much mileage as guaranteed tires, 

Manufactured by 

PRUDENTIAL RUBBER CO. 

Akron Ohio. U. b. A. 

W. D. NEWERF RUBBER CO. 
5J5 Golden Gate Ave.. San Francisco 



NO OTHER HIGH POWERED CAR APPROACHES 

THE2*iARMOJ* 



"Xh« E»ji«jt Riding Car In Th« WarU " 



Go,den Gate Ave. ECONOMY 



Telephone 
Franklin 4143 



REMY 
MAGNETO 



REMY ELECTRIC CO. 

170 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC 

AUTOMOBILE 

EXCHANGE 



The Largest Automobile Repair Shop 
In the West 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

43o Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 

CORREJA CARS 



THERMOS 

BOTTLES, CARAFES 
And LUNCH KITS 



AMERICAN THERMOS BOTTLE 

COMPANY 

Thermos Building. New York City 

and 

MOGENSON WELLS CO. 

Phelan B)dg.,San Francisco 



TIRE VULCANIZING 
AND JOBBING 



All Work Guaranteed 

McTARNAHAN VULCANIZING 

& TIRE COMPANY 

630 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 



PENNSYLVANIA 

VACUUM CUP 

TIRES 



PENNSYLVANIA 

RUBBER COMPANY 

512-514 Mission Street 




HAVE YOU SEEN IT? 

THE NEW 

MICHELIN QUICK-DETACHABLE-CLINCHER TIRE 

It's as good as the Michelin Red Inner Tube 



San Francisco 



MICHELIN TIRE COMPANY 

JLos Ansreles 




July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



35 



THE RIDDLE. 

I planted a seed in my neighbor's garden 

(Fair, wee garden where Wonder grows) 
Wet with a tear, that it may not harden, 

Seed of a Hope that the dear God knows — 
And for its cover, 
I folded over 
Five slim petals of a little Wild Rose. 

0, Lady-Liege of the Wonder-Garden, 
Riddle me, how is that seed to be — 
Quick with the sun of thy smile and pardon, 

Or dead and dust for despair of thee? 
Wilt thou it bloom as a flower of Arden ? 
Wilt thou it perish before we See ? 
Will thy palm forget 
Where my kiss was set 
To grow for a thought of me? 

— Charles F. Lummis in Scribner's. 



"What did Mrs. Kloseman give you for cutting her 

grass?" asked Tommy's mother. "Nothing," replied Tommy. 
"Why, she promised you ten cents, didn't she?" "Yes, but 
then I used her sickle to do it with, and she charged me ten 
cents for the use of it." — Catholic Standard and Times. 



^Toyo Kisen 
~ Kaisha 

(ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO.) 

S. S. Tenyo Maru (via Manila fllrect) Friday, July 12th. 1912 

S. S. ShJnyo Maru (New) Saturday, August 3. 1912 

S. S. Chlyo Maru Saturday, August 31, 1912 

S. S. Nippon mm i ii Saturday, Septei 

(intermediate Service Sale LCcommodations al reduced i il 

Steamere sail from company's pier. No. 34. near foot of Brannan 
street. 1 p. m. for Yokohama and Hongkong, calling at Honolulu, 
Kobe (Hlogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hong- 
kong with steamers for Manila. India, etc. 

No cargo received on biard on day of sailing. 

Round trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For freight and passage apply at office, 4th floor, Western Metrop- 
olis National Bank Building, 625 Market street. 

W. H. AVERY, Assistant General Manager. 



ARRANGEMENTS COMPLETE FOR WATER PAGEANT. 

Frederick Speedburner Swanton, ambassador extraordinary 
from the joyous kingdom of Santa Cruz, announces the comple- 
tion of all arrangements for the tremendous water pageant and 
summer festival planned for that resort during the week com- 
mencing July 20th and ending July 28th. According to official 
bulletins from the throne-room of King Pleasure, situated for 
the next four weeks in the big Casino facing the beach, 
Santa Cruz has been transformed into a veritable "City 
o' Dreams," in anticipation of the great crowd of merry 
makers who will assemble there during "Water Week." 

No expense has been spared to make the Sea Breeze 
City attractive and insure the happiness of a monstrous 
throng. The hotels, the Casino, the multiplicity of at- 
tractions lining the mile-long board walk, have all been 
polished and put in order, while a hundred new sensa- 
tions await the visitor who comes to Santa Cruz, 
whether it be for rest, recreation or a rollicking romp 
beside the sea. Even the usually indifferent fishermen 
on the long wharf near Lighthouse Point can be seen 
scouring up their launches and preparing for the jolly 
parties which will want to troll for finny monsters of 
the deep. All are on tip-toe, awaiting the 20th of July. 

The mystic island, upon which is constructed an im- 
mense phantom ship seating 4,000 persons, commands 
a beautiful view of the reinforced San Lorenzo River, 
down which will come nightly a procession of flower- 
decked, electric-lighted floats, filled with pretty maids 
and stalwart yeomanry. The background of hillocks, 
reaching down to the water, has also been sprinkled 
generously with twinkling lamps, making a picture of 
exquisite beauty. A wonderful lake has been formed 
around the island, while the bridge leading to it will 
remind one of the Pont du Gar on carnival nights in 
Paris. 

The day's sports in Monterey Bay, off shore from the 
Casino, will be never-ending. Coupled with the bath- 
ing, fishing and boat riding will be the great yacht and 
motor boat races; the fleet of warships and submarines; 
the hydroplanes in their bird-like flights 'twixt wind 
and water; and a dozen other novelties. On shore will 
be found golf, tennis, dancing, driving and kindred 
diversions. 

The railroads are offering especially low fares from 
all California points to Santa Cruz during pageant 
week. The hotels — amongst them the beautiful new 
Casa del Rey and the St. George — have announced that 
no "extras" will be charged, the regular rates being 
maintained throughout the festivities. Reservations 
for the Casa del Rey and the Cottage City may be 
made now, to take effect on July 20th, or thereafter, as 
preferred. 



THE LATEST STYLES IN 

Choice Woolens 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO., Merchant Tailors 



108-110 Suiter Street 



French Bank B]d|. 



It is reported that the first cargo of Japanese farmers 

and laborers for Brazil have started for their new home. 




We Are Off Today 






HAT you, Jack? Well; we are 

off today. Hoped to run in to 

shake hands with you before 

leaving-, but have been so busy 

clearing* up business matters that I 

haven't had a minute. Let that Calkins 

matter rest till I get back. Six weeks. 

Thanks. 

"Good luck to you, old man." 
When time presses, the telephone 
is frequently relied upon for last words 
and farewell messages. 

Every Bell Telephone is 
a Long Distance Station 

The Pacific Telephone & 
Telegraph Co. 






0TEL5 AND ^UITO RESORT 





Highland Springs 

RATES— Tents, SI- per week; cottage, $14 to $16: main hotel, $14, 
$16, $17.50. FARE— San Francisco to Highland Springs, train and 
stage. $S round trip; train and auto. $11 round trip. Special trans- 
portation rates to guests as follows: 1 week's stay at Highland 
Springs, San Francisco to Highland Springs and return by stage. 
$7; by auto, $9.50. 2 weeks' stay, San Francisco to Highland Springs 
and return, by stage, $6.50; by auto, $8.50. Those wishing these 
rates, inquire of Peck-Judah, 637 Market street, or address 

W. H. MARSHALL, Prop., Highland Springs. 



HARBIN SPRINGS 

NEAREST LAKE COUNTY RESORT TO SAN FRANCISCO 
A delightful run over good roads through a beautiful country. 
Automobile supplies kept; facilities for ordinary repairs; wash rack. 
Hot and Cold Tub Baths, Showers, Natural Hot Mineral Water 
Plunge, Swimming Tank, Etc. 

EXCELLENT TABLE. 



Emerald Bay Camp 

Beautifully situated, moderately equipped tents and cottages; 
boating, fishing, bathing, tramping. New management. Nelson L. 
Salter, Prop. Lee S. Seward, Manager. Address Manager, Emer- 
ald Bay P. O., Lake Tahoe, Cat., or Peck-Judah Co., 687 Market S*., 
San Francisco. 



HOWARD SPRINGS 

Lake County's Famous 42 Mineral Springs 

(Under new management) 

I_.itb.ia for kidneys; hot iron bath, llO degrees, for rheum- 
atism. The waters of the Hot Magnesia Springs have a wonder- 
ful record in the cure of stomach trouble; Sl2to$18 Der week. 

R. J. YATES, Prop., Howard Springs, Lake Counly. Cal. 



MOUNTAIN HOME 

In the Santa Cruz Mountains. No better place in Central California 
for hunting, fishing, or swimming. Table unsurpassed; delightful 
climate; stage at Morgan Hill Monday, Wednesday and Saturday. 
Excellent roads for automobiles. Train leaves San Francisco at 
7 a. m. Phone Farmers 51, Madrone. Send for souvenir of Mrs. 
Vic. Poncelet, Llagas, Cal. 



CARRS 

NEW MONTE RIO HOTEL 

Nearest to Station and River 

New modern hotel, first class in eveiy detail and equipped with every modern 
convenience. Swimming, boating, canoeinp. fining, launching, horseback 
riding and driving. Address C. F. CARR. Monte Rio, Sonoma Co Cal 



CASA DEL REY 



SANTA CRUZ 



CAL. 



New 300-room, fireproof hotel 
located near the beach and the 
Casino, open all the year round 

AMERICAN PLAN 

Tennis Courts, Good boating, 
bathing and fishing; numerous 
drives along the Coast and 
through the mountains. 

SUPERIOR GOLFING 

SANTA CRUZ BEACH HOTEL COMPANY 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Now Open 

Hot Steam Baths Cold Sulphur and Sour Springs 

Address — 

MISS ROSE ANDERSON 

Anderson Springs, Middletown Lake County, Cal. 



FETTERS HOT SPRINGS 

Modern, Convenient, Comfortable. Open all Year 'Round. 
Natural hoi mineral springs, bath-house 50 feet from hotel and 
cottages; electric lights, new garage; hot and cold mineral water in 
every room; hunting, fishing, swimming, orchard, vineyard and 
dairy; two blocks from station; auto and 'bus meet all trains. Buy 
ticket to Agua Caliente, via K. W. P. or S. P. Address GEO. FET- 
TERS, Fetters Hot Springs, Sonoma County. Cal. 



Brookdale Hotel 

Tn the heart of the Santa Cruz Mountains, only 2% hours from 
S. F. White sulphur water springs on hotel grounds. No wind; 
no fog. Climate ideal. TROUT FISHING, the best in 10 years. For 
information and booklet, write MRS. M. FAIRLEE, Prop., Brook- 
dale, or Peck-Judah's. 



C. J. Boehm, Proprietor. Ben Lomond, Santa Cruz County, Cal. 
18 Trains Dally. 

HOTEL BEN LOMOND 

AND COTTAGES 
C. J. BOEHM, Proprietor 

Rates $2.50 per day. Most beautiful home in the Santa Cruz 
Mountains. Private baths. All modern conveniences. First-class 
tennis and croquet courts. Billiards, Bowling Alley, Boating, Bath- 
ing and Fishing. 



Campers to Yosemite Valley 

Can be supplied with tents, complete camping outfits and all kinds 
of provisions at the Yosemite Valley store. Parties outfitted for 
High Sierra trips and flshinr excursions. Rates reasonable. NEL- 
SON L. SALTER. Proprietor. 



GILROY HOT SPRINGS 

Santa Clara County. 

Only four hours from San Francisco. Round trip rate. Including 
stage, $5.70. Fine road for automobiles. Full Information and 
folders at Peck-Judah Co.. 6S7 Market St., S. F., or 

w. j. Mcdonald, Prop. 



BEAUTIFUL 



Paraiso Hot Springs 



Now'» the Time to Visit California's Real Paradise 

Weather ana r is are unsurpassed Wonderful natural hot soda 

and sulphur; guaranteed for rheumatism, liver, kidney and all 
stomach troubles. Expert masseurs. Rates $12 to $16, Including 
baths. Round trip $G.:l.i. including auto. Mecca for north and 
south bound autos. Logii al one-day run. Free workshop and gar- 
age; accessories. Leave Third and Townsend. 9:00 a. m. First and 
Broadway, Oakland 8:00 a. m. Or will meet 4 p. m. train if notified. 
Booklets Peck-Judah or Bryans". 

H. H. McGOWAN, Prop, and Mgr. 



Paraiso Springs 



Monterey County 



YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK 

The Outing-Place of Cslifornia 

SNOW-CAPPED MOUNTAINS MIRROR LAKES AND HAPPY ISLES 

THUNDERING WATERFALLS MASSIVE WALLS AND DOMES 

A Galaxy Unsurpassed 

A Smooth, Dustless. Well Sprinkled Road Into the Valley 

A Special Feature of This Season's Trip 

The waterfalls are booming full. Condi- 
tions in the Valley were never better than 
this season. Surrounding mountain peaks and 
watersheds are covered with late snows, 
which insures a lasting flow of water. 

Why visit the commonplace resorts, when 
the sublime and the beautiful beckon you. 
Cost of this trip is now reduced to popular 
prices. Four excellent camps offer the visitor 
the most pleasing entertainment: 
CAMP CURRY, CAMP AHWAHNEE, CAMP 
LOST ARROW, SENTINEL HOTEL. 
J^ach is charmingly and picturesquely situ- 
ated on the floor of the Valley, surrounded 
by the masterpieces of Nature. 

It is now B quick, comfortable trip Into the 
Valley. For full information or descriptive 
folder, address your camp or hotel In Yosem- 
Ite, any ticket office or information bureau in 
I Eallfomia, or 




YOSEMITE VALLEY RAILROAD COMPANY, 



Merced, Cal. 



Hotel Westminster 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. Fourth and Main SU. 

American Plan . Reopened. 

Rates per day, $2.50, rooms without bath 
Rooms with bath, $3, $3.50 and $4. 

European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up. 
With bath $1.50 and up. 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



HAMMOCKS 

We have an overstock and will sacrifice these Hammocks at 
a very low price. We are making a specialty of Blue and White 
Canvas Striped Hammocks at $1.25 each. 

WEEKS-HOWE EMERSON COMPANY 



51 Market Street 



San Francisco 



White Diamond Water Co. *" *- * lgg 

laeorponird Berkafe* 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 
treated, but bacterioloplcally purified by electrical process. 6 gallons 
DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. $1.60 per month. Single 6 gallon 
bottle, 40 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 86792, 
57M Telegraph Ave., opposite Idora Park. Oakland, Cal- 

Mrs. Crawford — What's the advantage of a kitchenette 

apartment. Mrs. Crabshaw — Your husband can't come out in 
it when you're cooking. — Puck, 



Tallac and Brockway 

LAKE TAHOE 

The scenic resorts that have made Lake Tahoe 
famous. Open June 1st, under same management as in 
past years. Fishing season opens June 1st. 

Autos From Placerville Daily 

The Automobile Trip over the Placerville State Road 
is the most picturesque in America. Two 7-passenger 
Pierce-Arrow automobiles run daily, one leaving Placer- 
ville at 7 a. m. daily; one leaving Tallac at 7 a. m. daily; 
arriving at destinations at noon. 

LAWRENCE & COMSTOCK 

Tallac. Cal. Brockway. Cal. 




Open all the year. New 
ownership. New man- 
agement. New features. 
Forty rooms with private 
baths. 

Golf Tennis Bowling Fishing 

Boating Swimming Club House 

Free Garage 

Everything Possible for Your Comfort and Pleasure 
Rates $17.50 to $25.00 per week, $3.00 to $4.00 per day 

Booklets and other particulars at PECK-JUDAH CO., or write 
J. M.SHOUL.TS BEN LOMOND. CAL. 



Lake County 
Automobile Transportation Co. 

engers carried by automobile and stages from Pieta to High- 
tan.! Springs, Lakeport, KetseyvUle and Upper Lake Pine moun- 
tain scenery over this line, (Special all-rail and auto round-trip 
tickets, San Francisco to Bartlett Springs and return, only $18. In- 
cluding trip across beautiful clear Luke.) Also Soda Bay and re- 
turn for (13.50, Including boal on lake. Extra auto charge in addi- 
tion to stage from Pieta to Highland Springs, $1.50; to Lakeport 
$1.50. Tickets on sale al Northwest* rn Pacific Railroad Company, 
Perry Building, and nt i Market street. San Francisco. 



RIONIDO HOTEL 

AND TENTS 

The ideal resort of the Russian river. Now open. 
Make your reservations now. Rates #12 per week. 
Address Rionido Co., Rionido, Cal. 



MARK WEST SPRINGS 

Trains leave S. F. twice daily to Fulton, where stages connect. 
Round trip & 3. 75, including stage. Excellent table; hot mineral baths. 
All kinds of sports. Address MRS. M. MULGREW, Fulton, Cal. 
Particulars, Peck-Judah, 687 Market St. 



SUMMER RESORTS 

AT HOME. AT THE CLUB, CAFE OR HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 

Always Satisfactory 

GEO. W. CASWELL COMPANY 

530-532-534 Folsom Street Phone Kearny 3610 

Write for samples and prices Mention the News Letter 



THE GABLES 

The hotel that is different Everything new. Nearest hot mineral 
springs to City. Paying guests received. Address 

H. P. MATHEWSON, Sonoma, Cal. 
Buy tickets to Vtr.no. N. W. P. Railway 



38 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 




Pacific Mutual Life 
Ins. Co. of California 

Insure Against 

LOSS OF INCOME 

EARNING POWER 

or SALARY 




\/£gists£^£<^ 



SHREVE BUILDING 



Manager Accident Department 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital $1,500,000 



Assets $8,650,000 



California and Sansome Street*, 
San Francisco, California. 



Capital, 1400.000 



Assets, Over a Million 



Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 
(Best In the West.) 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass Accident and Health 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; Marshal A. Frank, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Joy Llchtensteln. Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co.. Treasurer: F. P. 
Deerlng, Counsel. L. B. Hoge, General Manager Accident and Health De- 
partment. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building. San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 416 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Weft Coaft Life Insurance Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

Geo. E. Billings Roy C. Ward James K. Polk J. C. Meussdorfff r Jamei W. Dees 

GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED 



312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Douglas 22S3 
Rome Phone C llll 



The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1860. 

Sixty-Second Annual Statement. 

Capital 11,000,006 

Surplus to Policyholders 3,117,28* 

Total Assets 7,617.091 

Pacific Department: 

Alaska Commercial Building ----- g a n Francisco 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 



REMEMBER!!! 


We write 




Liability Insurance, in all its branches, Automobile 


Plate Glass, 


Burglary, Elevator, and Health and Accident Insurance. 




PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY 




San Francisco, Cal. C. H. CRAWFORD. 


President 




inswancbI 




The office and field force, numbering more than three score, 
presented Geo. H. Tyson, Pacific Coast General Agent for the 
German-American Insurance Company of New York, Phoenix 
Insurance Company of Hartford, German Alliance Insurance 
Company of New York, and the Equitable Fire and Marine 
Insurance Company of Providence, with a magnificent silver 
loving cup, properly inscribed, this being his twenty-first year 
as Coast manager for the department. The Coast agency corps 
numbering nearly 3,000 are celebrating this occasion by an 
extra effort for business. General Agent Tyson has completed 
one-third of a century in the insurance business, and is still a 
young man. The cup was very much appreciated by him, sev- 
eral of the employees having been members of the staff since 
the inauguration of the department in the old Merchants' Ex- 
change Building in 1891. 

* * • 

One of the largest life insurance premiums ever paid in Ohio 
has been secured by W. A. R. Bruehl & Son, of Cincinnati, 
general agents for the Home Life of New York. The premium 
amounted to $76,970, being a single premium payment on a 
$100,000 fifteen-year endowment policy at the age of fifty- 
eight. The insured is a wealthy man, but wanted to provide 
for his old age against all contingencies. The company is 
carrying the entire risk without reinsurance. 

* * * 

Herbert Keith, a well-known local broker, has severed his 
connection with the firm of Keith & McCarthy, and has joined 
the rapidly growing and strong staff of the new Vulcan Fire 
of Oakland. Keith has had a wide and varied experience In 

the insurance field. 

* * * 

Hedley Woodward, vice-president of the Fidelity and Cas- 
ualty, of New York, has been delegated by the chief executives 
of other companies to ascertain if there is any possibility of 

standardizing certain features of accident policies. 

* * * 

Mrs. Lizzie English has brought suit against Joseph Lane, 
saloonkeeper of Indianapolis, and his surety, for $5,000 dam- 
ages on account of the death of her son in a saloon brawl. He 

was a minor, and it is alleged Lane sold him liquor. 

* • • 

Los Angeles is trying to discover a device that will register 
the speed of motor cars so that the police may be able to stop 
"joy" riding, with the usual attendant dispute. Several local 

inventors are hustling to produce the proper register. 

* * * 

Only two casualty companies have declined to join the newly 
organized Casualty Underwriters' Association of California. 
The association will hold another meeting at an early date to 
discuss details for improving the movement. 

* 4 « 

The Pacific Mail steamer, City of Panama, lost control of her 
engines some 250 miles south of San Francisco this week, and 
the steamer Rose City of San Pedro was sent to her relief on a 
wireless call. 

* * * 

The Manhattan Life is offering to its agents who write $50,- 
000 of accepted business between June 1st and September 30th 
a trip to Memphis during the convention of the National Asso- 
ciation of Life Underwriters in October. 

» * » 

William J. Dutton, president of the Fireman's Fund Insur- 
ance Company, has been elected a member of the executive 
committee of the National Board of Underwriters. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organized 1863. Cash Capital. $1,000,000 

insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere In United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss 
by fire. Automobile Insurance. Indemnity for loss of rental Income by 

fire. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent. J. J. SHEAHAN, Ass't Central Agent 

324 Ssnsoms Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



July 13, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



39 



Insurance companies — fire, life and casualty — collected pre- 
miums amounting to $1,801,099.93 in Arizona during 1911, ac- 
cording to the annual statement of Secretary of State Sidney 
P. Osborn. The New York Life enjoyed the largest premium 
income in the State, $285,453, followed by the Mutual Life 

with $152,487, and the Pacific Mutual Life with $124,753. 

* * * 

There were 242 legal reserve life insurance companies oper- 
ating in the United States at the close of 1911, according to a 
recent tabulation. Thirty-three new companies were organ- 
ized during the year, while eleven retired. At the end of 1910 
there were 220 companies operating, or one to every 418,066 

inhabitants, the estimate being based on the 1910 census. 

* • » 

The firm of H. R. Mann & Co. has been increased by four 
new members, J. B. Warner, Joseph McBoyle, F. M. Branch 
and Harry Durbrow, old and responsible employes of the 

company. 

* » • 

Fourth of July this year scored a remarkable record, with 
less than ten alarms. Several of these were false, and the 
only blazes started by fireworks were two insignificant grass 

fires. 

* * * 

The annual convention of the International Association of 
Fire Engineers will meet in Denver, September 17th. Nearly 

one thousand fire chiefs are expected to attend. 

* * * 

The Fireman's Fund has been investigating the Eastern 
Canadian field, and the chances are strong that the company 

will enter it on a vigorous business campaign. 

* * * 

J. W. Stewart and F. W. Dalton have organized the Oregon- 
Washington Underwriters', Inc., for the purpose of handling *he 

West Coast Life for those territories. 

* * * 

The Pennsylvania Fire is preparing to move into larger and 
more commodious quarters in the Royal Fire Insurance build- 
ing, Sansome and Pine streets. 

» * * 

The Sovereign Fire has opened an Oakland office with the 
Wheaton-Houser Company, and has applied for admission to 

the Oakland Board. 

* * * 

The receivers of the defunct Ohio German Fire have paid 
42*4 cents, and state that another small dividend will be forth- 
coming. 

* * * 

A blaze in lodging houses on Second street, Sacramento, 

caused $100,000 damages this week. 

* ♦ * 

Arthur R. Keith, of Hartford, has been appointed special 

agent for the San Francisco branch of the Travelers. 

* * * 

For the first six months of 1912 the San Francisco Life re- 
ports about $2,500,000 of business. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 

City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

PHYSICIANS. 
Dr. W. P. Agnew has moved his office to this city, and It now to be 
found In Room 424. Flood Building. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. All legal papers drawn up accurately. 
107 Montgomery street, near Sutter, San Francisco. 'Phone Douglas 601. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged: manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Mark i- 1 street, near Octet via. Telephone Fell 9911. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 10S9. 

Dr. Q. F. Nevlus Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St.. now at room 401 
Weatbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW. 
Samuel L. Shortrldge. Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Do uglaa 2178. __^ 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rlegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of I Geary street, remove corns entirely whole: painless, without knife. 
Bunions and In-growing nails cured by a special and palnlsas treatment 
M-IOs Weatbank Building, 110 Market street. San Francisco. 




HUNTER WHISKEY 

HIGH-BALL 

REFRESHING, SATISFYING, INVIGORATING 



w 



SoLd at al! first-class cafes and by jobbers. 
WM. LANAHAN & SON, Baltimore, Md. 





Continuous Eye Rest 
and Eye Comfort 




Mr. Geo. Mayerle, San Francisco. 

Dear Sir — I wore the glasses you made for me 12 years continu- 
ously, which I consider something wonderful, and can heartily rec- 
ommend you to any one in need of glasses. Also the new pair you 
just made suit me fine. Yours truly, 

M. A. MORGAN, 
417 South Gates St., Los Angeles, Cal. January 16, 1912. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Optician. 
Charter Member American Association of Opticians. 
960 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 
Mayerle's Eyewater, the Great Eye Tonic, freshens and 
strengthens the eye. Sent by mall on receipt of 65c. 

Mayerle's Antiseptic Eyeglass Wipers (a chemical cloth), 3 for 25c. 




Ask your 
Dealer for 

Goodyear 

"Hippo" 

Hose 

GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 
R. H. PEASE. President 589. 491. 593 Market St. 



The best and 

strongest 
Garden Hose 

Guaranteed to 

stand 700 lbs 

Pressure 

TRY IT AND 
BE CONVINCED 

San Francisco 



Citizens' Alliance 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

OPEN SHOP 

The union sacrifices the community to 
the wants of a select few, who are 
strongly organized. Others may starve 

CITIZENS' ALLIANCE OFFICES 
Rooms 363-384-366 Russ Building; 
Free Registration Bureao and Employment Office 



S A POLIO 

The big cake that does 
not waste, scatter or melt 

CLEANS, SCOURS, POLISHES FROM CELLAR TO GARRET 



40 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 13, 1912. 



BANKING 



Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Entrance to the newly equipped 
and up-to-date 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

Northeast Corner Market and 
Montgomery Streets 

BOXES $4.00 per year and upward 

TRUNKS. SUIT CaSES. SILVER CHESTS, 
Etc., Taken for Storage 

You are cordially invited 
to inspect these vaults 





ANGLO & LONDON 

PARIS NATIONAL 

BANK 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Paid-Up Capita] 14.000,000 

\ Surplus and Undi Tided Profit* $1,000,000 
"l Total Resources $40,000,000 

OFPICERS; 
t .. HERBERT F LE IS H HACKER Pretideot 

' S1Q. OREENEBi.UK Chairman of the Board 



JOS. FRIEDLANDER 


Vice-President 


C. F. HUNT 


Vice-President 


R. ALTSCHUL 


Cashier 


C. R. PARKER 


Assistant Cashier 


WM. H. HIGH 


Assistant Cashier 


H. CHOTNSKI 


Assittanl Cashier 


0. R. BURDICK 


Assistant Cashier 


A. L. LAN0ERMAH 


Secretary 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO 

SIR EDMUND WALKER C. V.O.. LL . D. . D. C. L . 
Presides! 

ALEXANDER LAIRD General Marnier 



ESTABLISHED 1867 

Paid-up Capital, $15,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 12,500,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently Issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way In which to carry money when traveling. They are Is- 
sued In denominations of 

$10, $20, $50, $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable In Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland Is stated on the face of each cheque, while In other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all Information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

460 California Street, corner Leldesdorff. 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

(The German Bank) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The following Branches for Receipt and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission St., Between 21m and 22nd 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 Clement St., cor. 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 Haight St., Near Masonic Ave. 

June 29th, 1912 
Assets ...... $51,140,101.75 

Capital actually paid up in Cash - - 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - - 1,656,403.80 

Employees' Pension Fund ... 140,109.60 

Number of Depositors .... 56,609 



Office Hours : 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays 
to 12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 
o'clock p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 



DEL MONTE SOCIAL ITEMS. 

Miss Dorothy Williams, the beautiful fiancee of Mr. M. 
Pinckard, with her father and sister, Mr. Gardner Williams and 
Mrs. William Mein, with the little folk, are again at Del 
Monte. 

Miss Grace Webster and her father, Mr. James S., were 
among the followers of the little white spheres last week, and 
Miss Webster defeated Miss H. Pillans, one of the steady 
players over that course, by five up and three to play, but she 
was allowed a handicap of 15 strokes, which was a good deal 
for an opponent to overcome. Mr. Webster was the genial 
speechmaker of the evening when the prizes were delivered. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Girvin are never content unless they 
spend a few months at Del Monte, and they put in many pleas- 
ant hours on the links, and with Mr. Sam Buckbee, Mrs. Girvin 
made a record in the mixed foursomes, which entitled them to 
a cup. 

Mrs. Clinton E. Worden and her mother, Mrs. A. N. Towne, 
who are spending their summer at Del Monte, were joined dur- 
ing the holiday tournament by Mr. Worden. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cuyler Lee and family arrived in two Packards, 
partly to attend the Del Monte festivities and to enjoy the 
many other pleasures which the summer season affords. 



An advance agent was ahead of a small one-night-stand 

show. The theatre in an Arkansas town of four thousand was 
called "The Jones Opera House," but the agent, thinking it had 
no name, had his "dates" printed "Grand Opera House." The 
"dates" are the sheets that go on the billboards, and show what 
night the performance will be given. When the manager of the 
opera house saw the "dates" he was provoked. "You've got to 
git 'em changed to 'Jones' Opry House,' " he said. "Jones : that's 
my name; it's named after me." He insisted, so the agent went 
to a local newspaper office to see what he could have the 
"dates" struck off for. He found it would cost $8. That was 
too much. He went back and told the opera-house manager. 
The latter thought it over a while. "Wal," he said finally, "that 
is a lot to pay. I'll tell you what to do. You gimme $3 an' I'll 
git a painter to change the name of the opry house to the 
'Grand.' The painter will do it for a dollar, an' I'll have $2 
for losin' the honor of havin' the house named for me." The 
agent handed over the money. — Indianapolis News. 



Bible Student (preaching his first sermon) — Yes, my 

friends, I am trying to follow the divine injunction to cast out 
the sick, heal the dead and raise the devil. — Columbia Jester. 



Wedding Presents.~- The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Dr. Acnew. rectsJ dlseaaes exclusively. 424 Pacific Building, San 

PrmnctocsV 



ARMOR PLATE SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of Union Safe Deposit Company in Building of 

UNION TRUST COMPANY 

of San Francisco 

Junction of Market and O'Farrell Streets and Grant Avenue 




Largest, Strongest and Most Conveniently Arranged 
Safe Deposit West of New York 

Boxes $4.00 Per Annum and Upwards Telephone Kearny 1 1 



MOTORING MAGAZINE SECTION WITH THIS ISSUE 



^\MIIIIIII|[|||||||I1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1II IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH'" '■■IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIllllllllllll ^'''lllllll llllllllllfflllHUlMlllllllllllllllllllll'//^ 




|||||||||||||||lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllll# 



1913 MODELS ARE HERE 

And Ready for Immediate Delivery 

Besides being the fastest car in the world, the 1 913 National is a thing of beauty. Its 
graceful lines, luxurious ten-inch upholstering and new features make it a joy forever. 







Self-starters, center control, left drive, mechanically operated lire pump, and 
all of those comfortable little conveniences which "cut down" trouble and 
add to the delights of motoring. 

Be sure and get a copy of our style book of the "V" Series 

Howard Automobile Company 

523-533 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 



Direct Factory Branch 

Announcement 



Ipnffil 



The Haynes Automobile Co., Kokorao, Indiana, announces that they have purchased control 
of the Haynes Auto Sales Co. (Van Ness Ave. at Turk St.) which will hereafter be conducted as a 
DIRECT FACTORY BRANCH under the direction and supervision of W. B. Cochran, President 
and General Manager of the Haynes Auto Sales Co., as factory representative. 

"With factory experts in the service department, the factory guarantee and the usual well-known 
attention given to cars of all Haynes owners, assures present owners and prospective purchasers 
the best satisfaction of any organization on the Pacific Coast. 

HAYNES AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 

KOKOMO, INDIANA 




FREDERICK MARRIOTT, SR. 

Founder "Illustrated London News." Established "San Fran- 
cisco News Letter" July 20, 1856. Inventor "Avator," built by 
Marriott's Aerial Navigation Company. Born July 16, 1805. 
Died December 16, 1884. 







Wm. S. O'Brien. 



J. C. Flood. 



J. W. Mackay. 



James G. Fair. 





£<2kC 




1 

John Parrott. 





D. 0. Mills. 



I. Friedlander. 



Wm. Sharon. 





C^ 

^ 




Jos. A. Donohoe. 



Jno. P. Jones. 



Lloyd Tevis. 







Milton S. Latham. 



Oliver Eldridge. 



William F. Babcock. 



Peter Donahue. 



FOUNDERS OF THE GREAT WEST. Reprinted from "Men We Know," in the S. F. News Letter of the '7ffs. 



=1 




Pioneer Days in San Francisco.— Cliff House steam dummy cars. Now replaced by modern pay-as-you-enter cars introduced by the 
United Railways. 




Pioneer Days in San Francisco. — Point Lobos toll road and city cemeteries, viewed from Presidio Heights in the early '80's. 




Pioneer Days in San Francisco. — Toll gate at Pt. Lobos and Masonic Avenues. Now the center of the west end of San Francisco. 




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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXIV 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 20, 1912 



No. 8 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter street. San Francisco. Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, and 156 Fifth 
avenue, S. L. Carman, representatives. 

Chicago Office— H. L. Selden, 122 South Michigan Boulevard. 

Boston Office — Charles S. Parr, 525 Tremont Temple. 

London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements, or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 
CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, should be sent to the office not later than 
5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, $2.25. 
Foreign — 1 year, $6.00; 6 months, $3.26. 



If you don't believe the Exposition is moving, take a look 

at the goings-on at North Beach. 

The Cleveland Grays are a goodly and cheerful lot, quite 

capable of curing any community of the blues. 

There wasn't much worth taking at Stockholm that our 

American lads are not bringing home in their luggage. 

Mormons are actively aiding the rebels in Mexico. They 

are always to be counted on as "agin the government." 

The tire ordinance is not the only piece of municipal 

legislation that was born so tired that it has slept ever since. 

How could there possibly be peace and harmony in a 

family where the son has married the father's divorced second 
wife? 

Whenever we need the help of a short, stout party with 

side-whiskers in running our canal, we'll let you know, Cousin 
John. 

The "hank of hair" and the "bone" are still permitted, 

but chaste communities like Santa Cruz, Cal., won't stand for 
the "rag." 

It was about time "Bat." Nelson was worsted by "Kid" 

Cupid. He has been licked by nearly every other scrapper he 
has tackled. 

Texas Tommy exhibits a pronounced limp since Dis- 
trict Attorney Fickert visited him early in the morning at his 
beach retreat. 

The best all-around athlete in the world is an American 

Indian, a product of the Carlisle school. Never again let us 
speak of "Poor Lo." 

The first assistant porchclimber of the Bulletin's editorial 

staff is reported to be making a pretty good thing out of his 
illustrated lectures. 

And now they have gone and taken away from him the 

seat in the Senate for which "Blonde Bill" Lorimer paid a lot 
of perfectly good money and which he had faithfully held down 
for two years. It is to weep in Trustville, 111. 



Death, after all, was the winner of the Marathon in the 

Olympian games at Stockholm. 

Seventeen million school children in the United States 

— and the stork is still a busy bird from sea to sea and from 
boundary to boundary. 

Is there in stock at Washington a toga that would fit a 

chubby, bald-headed citizen of Fresno who has no principles 
that are not reversible ? 

At seventy-eight Hetty Green, richest woman in the 

world, gets religion. She has taken a long time to find out that 
there are no pockets in a shroud. 

A vote of thanks is due the District Attorney from the 

denizens of the Seal Rocks for shutting down the music after 
1 a. m. Even an amphibian likes his sleep. 

It is officially reported from Washington that San Fran- 
cisco has spotted fever. Those Federal doctors must have had 
a "spotter" among us and we did not know it. 

It takes more than a silk hat and a long coat to disguise 

a city detective so that he looks like a regular guest at a fash- 
ionable wedding. There's no hiding those "police feet." 

Another statesman, with a record that smells to heaven 

for all political skullduggery, has "progressed" into a soft job 
on the San Francisco waterfront by way of reward for services 
rendered to the holy cause of Johnsonian reform. 

There ought to be stringent legislation forbidding pas- 
senger boats to run into and disable the massive battleships of 
the American navy. At least the passenger boat that has done 
such a thing should stand by and give aid to the crew of the 
warship. 

"I did it," says the irrepressible Colonel, commenting on 

the ousting of Lorimer. Who set the stars in the courses? Who 
makes the seasons come and go, and every living thing to grow ? 
Who discovered that two and two make four? The answer is 
the same. 

Tveitmoe, indicted editor of a local labor paper, devotes 

himself to abusing society and government for trying the au- 
thors of labor crimes. He himself is doubtless not afraid of the 
inside of a jail. Familiarity does actually breed a certain 
contempt. 

Senator Works, himself the wearer of a toga procured by 

fraud and brutal force, pronounces against the plan of the poli- 
ticians who made him what he officially is to rob the Republi- 
can voters of California of their rights. It makes a difference 
who is going to get the stolen goods. 

Some foolish voters wonder what service is rendered by 

Governor Johnson to the people who pay his salary, provide 
him his house and furnish him with an automobile. Pish ! The 
Governor has no time for business while politics is making and 
doing and -.ice-presidential nominations hang high. 



TUMP©® G@ffil(giMl&H©In)§ @ff Sllim Efcaiffldisc® 

Three generations of San Francisco, and for three generations always a Fred Marriott — permitting us that much of per- 
sonality — to serve it with a News Letter. It is a long record and an honorable one. No other publication of the Farther West 
can match it. 

This day, half a century and six years ago, the first News Letter was issued to the citizens of the new outpost flung far 
beyond the dreaming of the republic's builders. From that day to this there has been no week without its News Letter; for 
practically all those weeks, the News Letter has been a vital force in the molding of this city's thought and the shaping of 
its action — for fifty-six years we have furnished the salt to San Francisco's bread and wine, been mustard to its meat. Ours 
in all that time the task of keeping men from taking themselves too seriously or their responsibilities too lightly. The story 
of the News Letter's files for its fifty-six years would make a history of the mother-city such as has never been written — a 
history of its moral and intellectual growth, as well as of its material development, the like of which is not to be found in 
print. 

July 20, 1856, the first News Letter went forth to the new, raw city of the gold-seekers straggling along the western shore 
of the bay. It was actually a news letter — a four page convenience for the exiles that they might write to the "folks back 
home," and give them in type the news of the land and city of gold, together with the personal tidings and gossip of the 
writers' own pens. Two pages there were of fine type and two pages blank, all of letter size and the thinest paper. The 
name "News Letter," you see, was of more than passing significance. Then, as now and ever since, this journal was a power- 
ful medium for the spreading abroad of all that was worthy to tell about the first and greatest city of the Pacific. 

The Free* Marriott who founded the News Letter, father of the present owner and publisher, was founder of the Illus- 
trated London News, a man of a marked genius for journalism and of a high prophetic sense. He was among the few in 
that early day to foresee accurately the destiny of California and of San Francisco. To his son, and to his son's son, he left a 
heritage of responsibility and of opportunity that has made them in an unusual degree builders of the westernmost common- 
wealth of the Union. 

It is not exactly pertinent, and yet it is curious and interesting, that this same first of the Marriotts in California should 
have anticipated by more than a generation the pioneers of practical aeronautics. In 1868 he invented and patented the 
tigar-shaped airship, precisely of the type employed by Count Zeppelin for the navigation of the air by means of a dirigible 
balloon. 

But the best and most of the estate transmitted from Marriott to Marriott through all the days of the News Letter, the 
thing most cherished and esteemed, has been and is a sense of intellectual independence and a freedom of thought which have 
kept this journal ever on the side of real progress, and have made it a strong factor in directing the public mind along the 
channels of sanity. The News Letter has reverently preserved the traditions of its founder and striven toward his exalted 
standards; he put upon it indelibly the impress of his own rare genius for looking far ahead, for discriminating between the 
permanent and the transient, for marking out in advance the true path of California's and San Francisco's development. 

Naturally, then, the News Letter has drawn to its service from the beginning the best there has been of talent in a place 
peculiarly productive of literary ability. Scarcely a man or woman of literary distinction in this breeding ground of 
world-famous writers but has been at some time connected with the News Letter. The long roster of its editors and con- 
tributors is starred and sprinkled with names that the world of letters keeps in grateful remembrance. 

Bret Harte, Mark Twain, Stephen Massett, Henry George, "Jim" Bowman, Frank Pixley, Gertrude Atherton, Ambrose 
Bierce, Ashton Stevens, Wallace Irwin — these are a few of the names picked at random from the gallant and brilliant com- 
pany of the famous living and the world-honored dead who have glowed and sparkled upon these pages in fifty-six years. 
It was to the first Marriott that Bret Harte, then editor of the Overland Monthly, took the manuscript of his poem, "The 
Heathen Chinee." Mr. Marriott showed it to Bierce, who advised its use in the Overland Monthly. Harte could not see in 
that bit of his own craftsmanship worth enough for the pages of his magazine. He tentatively offered it to the News Letter, 
but withdrew it, and, after several months, made room for it in the Overland Monthly. 

The first "Town Crier" was Tremenheere Johns, mordant, cynical, versatile, witty and vastly productive. That depart- 
ment of the News Letter has always retained the form and much of the spirit of Johns. 

James Watkins, son of Commodore Watkins, later editor of the New York Evening Sun, was one of the News Letter's 
early contributors, and throughout the Franco-German war, William M. Laffan, late publisher of the Sun, furnished this jour- 
nal with correspondence on that subject which was singularly accurate and vivid. 

Though this article does not pretend to review the list with any minuteness, it must mention some of the other editors 
and contributors whose genius has illuminated these pages: the gentle-souled Dan O'Connell, Earl Marble, Sam Davis, Wil- 
liam M. Neilson, Henry D. Bigelow, Robert Greathouse, Gelett Burgess, Jack London, Frank H. Gassaway, Joaquin Miller, 
and a host of others such as they. 

It is the News Letter's pride that the best brains and ability of its time and place have ever come to it seeking expression, 
and have here found the fullest freedom and the frankest encouragement. This office has furnished for more than half a cen- 
tury the open door to fame and reward for the intellectual independents of the Pacific Coast. That it could not have done 
but for its liberal policy, its own sturdily maintained independence. This journal has persistently refused to be bound by 
any narrow local limitations of traditions or prejudice, just as it has kept its own head and its own footing in times of stress 
and popular clamor. Always it has dared to be itself, and to let its writers be themselves, believing that originality of 
thought and expression was a thing to be fostered; holding that its own freedom was its best possession and asset; preferring 
to breast the tide of public opinion rather than drift with it. 

Without self-praise, the News Letter may say that its influence has been steadily and effectively exerted toward the 
betterment of the people it has served. So much its files show beyond any cavil. Its corrective influence has been a check 
upon over-ambitious public men; it has spurred negligent and lazy public officials and slothful public bodies with a pointed 
pen; sham and fraud have had scant mercy at its hands — and all the long way it has kept reminding men that life without a 
laugh in it is a thing tragically dull. All the time the News Letter has endeavored to make its readers see the better and 
brighter side of humanity; has been firm in its faith that here was the theatre of the world's greatest drama of progress and 
development, and here the home of a distinctive civilization; has dreamed brave dreams of greatness for this place and this 
people, and has labored to help make those dreams come true. 

Fifty-six years ago to-day! It is a long retrospect. The News Letter is intensely proud of the achievements recorded for 
itself and for its community in the files of that period — proud that in nearly three thousand weeks it has not missed an is- 
sue, though, with the metropolis, it has passed through more than one almost cataclysmic disaster; proud that the name Mar- 
riott has always been linked with the fortunes of this enterprise ; proud that the inspiration of its founder is still vital and virile 
in its aims and policies. 

Fifty-six good years behind us. Ahead of us — of this city and of this journal — a vista of better years than we have 
ever known. In those coming years we shall have our say and our share, and shall play our part whole-heartedly, patrioti- 
cally, independently. 



July 20, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



So, after all these wasted years and 
Information that is squandered dollars, it costs us an- 
Worth the Price. other $50,000 to learn that the Man- 

son plan for a Sierra water supply 
from the Hetch-Hetchy is all wrong. Thank you, Mr. Engineer 
Freeman; your information is worth the price. 

The News Letter might say at this point: "We told you so!" 
For a long time we have been urging upon public attention the 
fact that the Hetch-Hetchy project was being, and has been 
from the start, mishandled. Manson's incapacity for a problem 
of this magnitude was early apparent, and now it seems to be 
officially admitted that he is not and never was competent for 
any undertaking of consequence. Mr. Freeman is undoubtedly 
competent; he tells us that pretty nearly everything we have 
done with regard to Hetch-Hetchy must be thrown away — that 
we must begin anew on a wholly different plan and basis. That 
judgment signifies that considerably more than a million dol- 
lars and several years of precious time have been absolutely 
wasted. 

The Garfield permit, according to Mr. Freeman, will not do. 
The conditions attached to it and accepted by the city are too 
narrow, and they bind us to a course which he deems most 
unwise. We must, he says, get a new grant from the govern- 
ment, must develop Hetch-Hetchy first and Lake Eleanor and 
Cherry Creek later as they are needed. There must be no 
pumping stations and no open conduits. 

Thus the whole question is put back to where it was when 
James D. Phelan made the original filing on the headwaters 
of the Tuolumne, and started the foolish campaign for Hetch- 
Hetchy. There will be interminable hearings; new maps and 
surveys must be prepared ; delegations must be sent to camp at 
Washington and pester the bureaucrats and Congressmen for 
their support. Wires must be pulled and influence exercised 
and politics must be done to get the requisite new and broader 
grant. The whole case will need to be put before Congress 
and lobbied through the two Houses. It will take probably 
more than a year to do this much, possibly two or three years. 
After that, assuming that the grant is made, we may begin to 
plan and to acquire the necessary rights of way. 

Again the News Letter puts to the community's common 
sense the question: Why not abandon the Hetch-Hetchy folly 
at once and take up some of the other cheaper, better and more 
available Sierra sources? 

XT 
Little examination of the postal 
A Gross Injustice. history of the United States is re- 

quired to show the colossal stupid- 
ity of the proposition to increase second-class rates from one 
cent to two cents a pound. And it is more than stupidity; it is 
the grossest injustice to one of the nation's greatest industries. 

Advocates of the increased rate use as one of their chief 
popular arguments the tentative promise that the raise would 
permit the reduction of first-class or letter postage to one cent. 
And yet it is a matter of record that in the last fiscal year the 
second class receipts were $9,000,000, and the first class re- 
ceipts $163,000,000. The proposed reduction of first-class and 
increase on second-class would have made the total receipts for 
those classes $99,500,000 instead of $172.000,000— rather more 
of a deficit than even wealthy Uncle Sam would care to face. 

The increase of the second-class rate has been recommended 
by the Hughes Postal commission of Congress, and President 
Taft has approved it. The matter is now in the hands of Con- 
gress. For twenty-seven years commissions have been trying 
to find out what the second-class service costs the department, 
and the figures have been put anywhere from 2 1 2 cents to 9 3 4 
cents a pound. The conclusion of Congressman John A. Moon, 



chairman of the House Committee on Post Offices, is that "no 
expert on earth can come within fifteen or twenty millions of 
dollars of what the compensation ought to be for the transpoi- 
tation of second-class mails." 
Further, Mr. Moon said: 

"The very minute you undertake to reach the correct result 
you are confronted with the proposition that you cannot with 
justice flatly charge the cost of transportation and handling to 
a class of matter that in itself produces a return to the govern- 
ment in another class of matter in excess of the charges of 
transportation and handling of that matter itself — the second- 
class." 

The fact is that Canada, with a territory even more expensive 
to cover than ours, charges only % of a cent a pound for pos- 
tal matter equivalent to our second-class publication mail. The 
further fact is that, under Postmaster-General Hitchcock, it has 
been demonstrated that the traditional postal deficit is not due 
to the second-class rate, but to inefficient management. Al- 
ready Mr. Hitchcock has succeeded in turning a deficit of many 
millions into a small surplus without any impairment of the ser- 
vice. Thus he has removed the only reasonable ground there 
ever was for the movement to increase the second-class rate. 

3sr 
It is fortunate that the United 
The Panama Canal States has some few men big and 

And Special Privileges, broad enough to understand what is 
the matter with our sea-borne com- 
merce and our shipping industry; men brave enough to face the 
corporation-baiting mob and proclaim the truth about the Pan- 
ama Canal. The proposition to use the canal as a means to give 
a portion of our own shipping a left-handed subsidy is non- 
sensical as well as unjust. It would not help our merchant 
marine; it would not promote our commerce in any department; 
it would be grievously a violation of the spirit, if not the letter, 
of our treaty with Great Britain. 

When our ports are free on equal terms to the vessels of all 
nations; when our canal is an open waterway, charging the ships 
of all flags alike and taking from them no greater toll than will 
maintain the canal; when the tariff wall is pulled down to the 
lowest level that will bring us needed revenue for purely 
national purposes — then we shall be the greatest producer and 
seller among the nations. Then all our ports will be crowded. 
Then we shall not be able to build ships fast enough to keep 
pace with the demand for American tonnage. 

To penalize the entry of our vast railway transportation capi- 
tal into the maritime department of commerce is as crazy a 
notion as ever affiicted a fad-ridden, demagogue-driven people. 

To make the canal free to our own ships and levy a toll upon 
the tonnage of the other nations would be to discourage the very 
commerce which we are building the canal to promote — and it 
would be a futile device to increase our merchant marine, as 
futile as any of the subsidy schemes that have failed to get 
through Congress. It is not lack of a subsidy that keeps our 
flag off the sea; that condition is due to the fact that it costs 
much more to build ships in this country than in any other, and 
costs very much more to run them under our flag than under 
any other. No subsidy will cure that condition, nor even serve 
as a palliative. 

American money and enterprise are making the canal, it is 
true. Americans will manage it and protect it, but that is no 
reason why we should make ourselves a preferred customer. It 
is not sound economics nor respectable diplomacy. It is not 
even gooc horse sense. We want all the world to trade with us, 
to buy what we raise and make. To tax all the world at the 
Panama gateway would be like opening a great store and then 
charging a imission to all foreign patrons. 



8 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 20, 1912. 



Public sentiment is changing on the 
The Cry for Water. question of a water supply. The 

people of San Francisco and the 
bay cities no longer look with favor on the Spring Valley as a 
permanent system, and the idea of looking to the Hetch-Hetchy 
has pretty generally been abandoned. The Spring Valley has 
a fairly good distributing system, but its supply of water is so 
limited that it is unable to furnish enough good water to meet 
the demands of San Francisco alone. The mains in the Sunset 
and Richmond districts are neither ornamental or useful, nor 
will mains of any kind be useful in those districts until they 
connect with an adequate source of supply. Meanwhile, resi- 
dence property values in both districts are bound to suffer from 
a demand for homes far below what it should and would be, 
for both distrhts are handicapped by an inadequate supply of 
water, and so long as that condition exists, the attraction for 
home building will surely exert a retarding influence with 
home-seekers, and yet by nature and climate the Richmond and 
Sunset districts are probably the most desirable parts of the 
bay region for residence, but good air, good sunshine and good 
water are necessary, because they are three essentials to health, 
comfort and pleasure. The air and sunshine are not deficient 
at any time, but there is an unsatisfying water supply all the 
time. When that weakness is made reliably strong, these two 
districts will undoubtedly be the most attractive and desirable 
sections of San Francisco. 

But the people are not despondent. They know that there is 
an abundance of good water within reach of the city, and that 
sooner or later their now idle mains will convey plenty of good 
and pure water to them. Meanwhile no sane property owner in 
either district is going to sacrifice his holdings, but many 
would-be new-comers are likely to be deterred for the moment. 
The fact that the Sierra Mountains and their foothills hold in 
storage many times over the possible or probable future needs 
of the bay cities for wholesome water is bound to stimulate the 
people in interest to seek and obtain that source of water sup- 
ply, nor will they feel justified in abandoning its offer on ac- 
count of the cost of obtaining it. That much is already settled 
in the minds of the people of San Francisco, the more surely so 
because they have no encouragement to turn in any other direc- 
tion for that which they must have. Facing the water question 
as it actually stands, it behooves the people of San Francisco 
to lose no time in securing a hold on the stored waters of the 
Sierras and of their foothills, which is ample in supply for all 
time. 

The "Examiner" of July 16th truthfully says: 

"The present administration has an admirable program of 
public improvements which it is carrying out with gratifying 
vigor, but we hope that it will set one thing before all the rest 
and let nothing stand in the way of its proper adjustment, and 
this is the water question. 

"A great deal of attention has been given to the sufficiency 
of the water supply and the refusal of the Spring Valley to ex- 
tend its water mains into the districts where there is no water 
supply. Those questions are grievous enough, but they are not 
the worst. It is bad to have to confess it, but it is better that 
the public should understand that the water that the Spring 
Valley is serving is filthy and unhealthy and should never be 
drunk unless it has been boiled. 

"An examination of the filter of a large building recently 
showed some small shell-fish and live bugs and worms, which 
made a disgusting and offensive exhibit. 

"To take such stuff into the human system is to invite sick- 
ness, and therefore, aside from convenience, the water supply 
should be put ahead of every other as a matter of health. The 
lives of children and adults alike are hazarded by use of this 
unhealthy stuff, and there is nothing before us that is more 
important than securing a good, clean supply of water for the 
people of this city to drink. 



"The financial conditions of the company are not for an in- 
stant to be considered as against the health of the people, and 
something must be done without delay to stop the service of a 
polluted supply." 

Bee culture is one of the most im- 
Manufactured Honey, portant of California's industries, 

but not all the honey marketed in 
this State is California honey. Some call it adulterated honey, 
but, in fact, it is not honey. It is manufactured honey, and in 
no sense could it be classified as pure food. Most of the so- 
called honey one finds in restaurants and grocery stores is not 
food at all, much less pure food. Pure food should be and is 
identical with the elements of the body, and capable of trans- 
formation into them. Pure honey is one of the most wholesome 
of foods, but counterfeit honey is congenial to all sorts of dis- 
ease germs. The stuff the public complains of and condemns 
for being a delusion, is a compound of glycerin, glucose, flavor- 
ing extracts, acids and essential oils in appropriate quantities. 
This component makes an imitation of honey that would de- 
ceive the honey bees themselves; besides, honey made by this 
process is about fifty per cent less than the bees' product, 
which may be said to be the incentive to manufacture and mar- 
ket the counterfeit. 

Moreover, honeycomb is thought by many to be the pure ar- 
ticle, but it is as uncertain as to its purity as "strained" honey. 
More than thirty years ago a New York manufacturer of fancy 
groceries was discovered in the act of making "pure honey in 
the comb." The fellow had discovered a chemical process by 
which he could extract the honey from the comb, and a 
mechanical process by which he could refill the comb with his 
compound of glucose, glycerin, oils and acids. He did mix 
the extracted honey with the compound, but sold it in jars for 
pure honey, which it was, and the price was about double that 
of the manufactured honey, which was a poisonous food fraud. 
But it is not so difficult to detect artificial honey. When ex- 
posed it soon becomes glutinous, tenacious and sticky, having 
the consistency of glue, and antagonistic to the elements of the 
body, and is not capable of transforming itself into a healthful 
food. If the government pure food experts would search more 
for spurious compounds and less for food adulterations, the 
public would have reason to be thankful. Meanwhile, lovers of 
honey would do well to demand proof that the honey on sale is 
the real product of bees, and not of a syndicate of honey manu- 
facturers. Anyway, there should be some law that would dis- 
criminate between an honest bee and a dishonest man honey 
producer. Public health demands as much, and the quickest 
way of accomplishment is to make the sale of honey unlawful 
when it has not the guarantee of the Pure Food Commission. 




MARK 



DRY 



BOORD'S 

LONDON, ENG., GINS 

OLD TOM 



TWILIGHT 

Charles Meinecke & Co. 



Agints Pacific Coast 



314 SACRAMENTO ST., S. F. 



"Hear the Crier? Who the devil art thou" 



"One that will play the derll, elr. with you.' 



One great marine catastrophe, like that of the Titanic, in 

a millenium wakes up our governing body at Washington long 
enough to loudly and vehemently demand an official inquiry. A 
newspaper trial follows, all the popular and political prejudices 
being carefully paraded in the foreground, while the main is- 
sue is entirely overlooked, and a verdict of gross negligence is 
found, the condemnation being against the shipowners rather 
than against our lawmakers who, for purposes of their own, per- 
sistently ignore the necessity of creating laws that will force 
shipowners to give the traveling public the proper life saving 
protection. The situation of sea travel in this particular is as 
absurd and as fatal as the present condition of railroad travel. 
Accidents on the railroads of the country destroy from one to 
fifty lives daily, the total for any month of the year exceed- 
ing the loss of a Titanic disaster. Yet on account of the com- 
parative insignificance of this death roll, when regarded from 
a single day's viewpoint, and the public's long familiarity with 
such a commonplace occurrence, it has failed to awaken a popu- 
lar demand for drastic reform. As in the case of marine dis- 
asters, the law-makers of the land are asleep on this line of re- 
form. This gross laxness is being heavily paid for by the pub- 
lic. In the past decade more lives have been sacrificed to this 
neglect in framing and enforcing the proper remedial laws 
than have been lost in all the wars of the same period. Even a 
superficial investigation of the situation by the lawmakers 
would disclose the fact that a great proportion of these railroad 
casualties are due to overworked employees. In the case of 
engineers who fail to catch the signals, it would be well to re- 
member that passenger liners at sea, with hundreds of miles of 
sea room, constantly have two or three lookouts, and that loco- 
motives should likewise carry men whose sole duty it should 
be to watch the clear-way and report dangers to the engineer. 
With such a lookout on a rapidly moving train, in constant 
readiness to send and receive signals, the present gross sacrifice 
of human life would be very materially reduced. 

The passage by Congress of a bill providing for a 

Sailors' Home for San Francisco is one of the highly commend- 
able bits of legislation by that body. It is astonishing that a 
great seaport like this, the greatest on the Pacific Coast of the 
United States, and one of the greatest in the world, should 
have been so long unprovided with a home for disabled or 
superannuated sailors. One existed in the past, but went out of 
existence some years ago, simply because it was not properly 
provided for, and not because there was not a demand for it. 
The life of the mariner is a trying one, the pay is small, and the 
follower of the sea, especially before the mast, has little or 
nothing to look forward to for his old age or incapacity. In 
New York, on Staten Island, there is a splendid Sailor's Home, 
which has been generously fostered by the national government, 
which details an efficient naval officer to act as its governor. At 
the New York home, old mariners are cared for, as well as are 
the veterans at the national soldiers' homes. It should be so 
in San Francisco, and with the passage of Senator Perkins' bill 
it is reasonable and gratifying to believe such will be the case. 

A rampageous big mule drove the clerks from a depart- 
ment store this week. A bargain counter sale of breakfast 
toasted oats in the cereal department must have caused his 
rush. 



An enterprising parson has offered a prize of $200 for 

the best essay upon the subject of "why men don't go to 
church." In the first place, the sitting room lounge is more con- 
ducive to a comfortable sleep than the back of a pew, whatever 
the style of molding. Some one must stay home and take care 
of the baby. Church time comes on Sunday morning, and two 
sermons in a day after his "Saturday night out" are too strong 
a dose, anyhow. He never has a new bonnet, and if he had, the 
natural viciousness of his character would make him put it on 
hind side before to cause a scandal. He don't like collection 
plates passed around by snuffy-nosed deacons. He likes to 
give the parson a chance to get his salary raised. He is an 
irreligious brute, anyhow, and church time falls just at the most 
favorable hour for a game. Any unoccupied Bohemian who 
chooses to work these suggestions up into an essay will find us 
perfectly willing to divide the prize money with him. 

The reprehensible practice of throwing babies and other 

stuff into vacant lots has come into favor again. We do not 
wish to contest the doctrine that babies are sunbeams in the 
house and joys forever, and all that sort of thing, but if parents 
about to discard their offspring would first provide the little 
dear with a certificate of vaccination, it would inexpressibly re- 
lieve the mind and contribute to the comfort of that ridiculous 
individual, the early bird, who gathers the babies. In fact, 
the whole proceeding would be materially improved upon his 
cremating the superfluous baby in the family oven with the 
corn bread. It must be a deal of trouble for an unwilling 
mother to hunt up an empty lot. 

If a spider were as big as an elephant, he would be a 

more unpopular animal than he is. If a frog were as large as 
a whale, fricasseed frog would cease to be a popular dish. If 
a flea were the size of a unicorn, womankind would not sit and 
gaze at you with the smile of a cherub while dying to scratch 
her back. These philosophic reflections are called forth by a 
faithful course of study of the Bulletin editorials. Like many 
other nuisances, they are tolerable only because they are 
minute. While they are confined to three or five lines, a suf- 
fering public will endure them; but if extended to ten, the peo- 
ple must protect themselves. 

The expression in the eyes of a stricken deer is hilarious 

mirth as compared with the tender appeal in an Italian musi- 
cian's face when he passes around his hat. One always pays 
the Italian harpist because he is so romantic, whether due to 
his eating flour by the yard, or to his patrician contempt for 
the bath, has never been explained. However it be, he gets the 
money, and when he gets it he stops the music. One may entreat 
for a strain from "Trovatore," "Madame Angot," or "Girofle- 
Girofla : he becomes as innocent of music as a bag-pipe, and you 
pray in vain. Moral : Never pay the Italian harpist till you pay 
him to quit. 

Bridge is reported as being replaced by "cooncan," and 

"cooncan" is the introductory card of Texas Tommy. Is that 
versatile and irrepressible "ragger" bent on encircling the 
globe ? 

No wonder the gaping Teutonic nations shouted "Raus 

mit 'im !" when Uncle Sam ran away with most of the points at 
the recent big Olympic games held at Stockholm. 




LfOOKE^L 




Women haven't yet learned to "play the game" of politics, but 
when they've made up their minds exactly what they want, 
they go after it most capably. 

A beautiful demonstration of this was last Thursday's pre- 
sentation to the Board of Police Commissioners of their re- 
quest that twenty-one women be appointed on the police force, 
with the same authority to enforce law, and the same pay, as 
men, but to be designated as "protective officers." 

The scene in the Board room was a study in contrasts. Weari- 
ness — from grinding over the same old grist of petty trans- 
gressions, calling for fine or reprimand, or both — was the pre- 
dominating expression on the faces of the members of the 
board, but it gave place to deep interest and courteous atten- 
tion (with smiles and laughter at the proper places) when the 
spokesmen for those forty women went up to present the mat- 
ter; and dead-in-eamestness characterized the countenances of 
the women. 

And then's when they might have played politics, and didn't, 
for they said they represented upwards of thirty-five women's 
clubs of San Francisco, but they neglected to mention that their 
voting strength is close to eighteen thousand, although Mrs. 
Felts, of the Richmond Women's Tax Payers' Association, did 
intimate that if the Charter provisions are not broad enough to 
be made to embrace women protective officers, "We'll fix it!" 
and did state that her association includes about seven hundred 
voters. 

The conclusion arrived at after discussion was that it will 
be necessary to first confer with Mayor Rolph, and on his 
recommendation the matter can come before the Supervisors 
for such action by them as may be necessary. 

The members of the Police Commission expressed them- 
selves as heartily in favor of the innovation, which the women 
believe will be of immense benefit in the protection of women 
and children. It is proposed that five of these officers be de- 
tailed to parks, four to nickelodeons, two to the Ferry Building, 
one as Superintendent, the others being variously assigned. 
There are over eighty nickelodeons in operation, and no other 
city on earth has so extensive a park system, and they have 
figured it mighty close to cover the work contemplated with 
only that many officers. It would likely be the part of wisdom 
to grant their petition as it stands, before they conclude that 
we need more. Twenty-one women officers, as against some 
nine hundred men, seems altogether too reasonable, and women 
have the reputation of getting what they go after. Nearly every 
one of the seventeen odd thousand registered voters will act 
from now on as a committee of one to promote registration of 
women. Los Angeles has something like a hundred and five 
thousand registered, and San Francisco never has been noted 
for lagging much. The men folk had better be thinking over 
what sort of a trade they can make with the women for their 
support of this measure. 

o- V V 

They were talking about whether it was good form for the 
delegates to the Biennial Convention of Women's Clubs to 
register as "Mrs. So-and-So and husband," as so many did, 
and whether a woman ought to lose her individual identity 
when she marries. It was on the ferry-boat. One could eaves- 
drop with perfect propriety, and the two were individuals of the 
type that a crowd emphasizes rather than includes. It was 
quite plainly the June-time of love in their affairs, and the joy- 



ousness of their outlook on life gave even a lonely watcher a 
sort of Monte Crista feeling. It seemed they had encountered 
a couple where the wife did all the talking, and her husband 
supplemented each story with "Yes; it happened just that way," 
like the chorus in a musical comedy. They had even tried, 
unsuccessfully, to trap him into varying the remark. 

And my lady-in-love's closing comment was : "Working 
alone, it almost seems as if women are blundering as seriously 
as men have. How can we win what we want in the face of a 
few foolish ones who want the earth. And he replied: "Women 
will win in a walk when they realize all that is necessary is to 
be a star to gain recognition as such, and until they really are 
individuals it doesn't matter much what ruses they resort to. 
The chorus is bound to be the chorus, always." 
B <5 B 

They have quite a budget of new schemes in mind — the club- 
women. Reforms are absolutely passe with the up-to-the-min- 
ute members, whose immediate purpose and concern is accom- 
plishment. Food inspection will be one of the next points of 
attack, for they believe the pure food and drug act can be and 
should be carried out to its fullest extent and intent. Some of 
them are interested, too, in the establishment of a Court of 
Domestic Relations, to do team work with the Juvenile Court, 
so to speak. Chicago's experiment has proved wonderfully 
successful. Last year, which was the first since its institution, 
they handled seventeen hundred and fifty cases, dispensing ad- 
vice, medicine, correction, or a helping hand, as the situation 
demanded. 

1912-13 is going to be a very busy session. 
S B 5 

Jake Treagar, the well known politician and dictator of the 
Oakland Lodge of Moose, has lost all faith in humanity. He 
trusts nobody, net even his dog, and he tastes his cream before 
putting it in his coffee. 

The other evening Treagar had three friends out in his 
machine. Coming into town about dinner time they drew up 
in front of the club, and arrangements were made to dine to- 
gether at a local cafe. Treagar and another of the party started 
off for the restaurant, the other two promising to follow shortly. 
As soon as Treagar and his companion were out of sight, the 
two remaining descended upon the unprotected car, drawn up 
to the curbside, and stripped it of the handsome buffalo robes 
which it sported and the owner's overcoat, to say nothing of an 
extra tire neatly done up in its case at the side. Chuckling 
with delight, they carried their loot up into the club rooms, and 
deposited it safely in a cabinet in the secretary's sanctum, and 
then hurried off to keep the dinner appointment. 

The meal passed off without a hitch, when Treagar suggested 
that they wind up the evening's festivities with a spin out along 
the boulevard. With alacrity they hurried into their coats and 
over to where they had left the machine. 

"D'you know," remarked Treagar on the way over, "I'm an 
awful careless fool. I go away and leave my robes in my car, 
and often my overcoat. Some day I'll come back and find them 
gone, and then I'll wish I hadn't." 

"That's right," remarked one of the guilty ones. "You really 
ought to be more careful, Jake. There's a great deal of just 
such thieving going on now." 

With that they reached the machine, Treagar in the lead. 
Just one glance sufficed to show him that the worst had hap- 



July 20. 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



pened. "I knew it!" he yelled; "I had a hunch. Gosh! Look 
at that — my robes and my overcoat both gone. Pile in, fellows, 
we'll beat it right over to the police station." In the act of 
cranking up, he discovered the absence of his tire case, and 
his frenzy rose in leaps and bounds. "I'd like to get my hands 
on that son of a gun," they heard him mutter as he jumped in. 

With commendable zeal they waited until within half a block 
of the station before breaking the news to him. And from the 
way he talked then you'd think he was sorry the stuff hadn't 
been stolen. 

The next day he took his machine to a garage, where he left 
it with minute instructions. When he got it back it had prac- 
tically been done over. It has a regular receiving vault in the 
bottom, and once it's locked, the angels of heaven couldn't pos- 
sibly discover the combination. Then there is a large steel rod 
which twines itself lovingly around the tire case, and is pad- 
locked to the floor of the machine, not to mention all sorts of 
baby padlocks protecting the cushions, the tool chest, the 
speedometer, etc. The crowning glory is a burglar alarm 
which is warranted to be the real thing. 

Now Treagar is offering a reward to the man who can steal 
even so much as a fly from off the cushions. 

B o- o- 

This is a warning to burglars. Ordinarily the Lookeron has 
no patience with that branch of the human family, but neither 
does he believe in the tortures of the Inquisition, and the in- 
genious trap set recently for the unwary porch-climber in one 
of our new apartment houses calls for protest. 

Two very charming girls are ensconced in one of these apart- 
ments, and the other day suffered the loss of their jewelry, 
trinkets and so forth through the kindly ministrations of a roam- 
ing thief. There was no clue left by which the visitor's identi- 
fication might be ascertained; but the fact that only one silver 
spoon had been taken gave rise to the fear that the thief, on 
testing the lone spoon, would return and attempt to carry off 
the remainder of the flat ware. 

Now the very next afternoon one of the girls was summoned 
by telephone to take dinner and spend the night with her sister, 
whose husband had been called out of town unexpectedly, 
which left one very badly frightened maid at home alone. She 
ate a lonely dinner in the trim little apartment, and then settled 
herself to read. But read she could not. Visions of brutal 
marauders danced over her pages, and every sound carried an 
unspeakable menace. Finally she decided to go to bed and try 
to forget her fears in sleep, but before retiring she felt that 
something should be done as a sort of protection. 

She racked her brain for a device that would answer the 
purpose, and then like a flash came the inspiration. Out to 
the kitchen she stole, and securing a package of fly paper, crept 
back to the entrance hall. This she carefully carpeted with 
the sticky stuff as far as the living room door. Then, as a 
crowning finish, she suspended over this entrance a huge dish- 
pan of water in such a way that the slightest jar would pre- 
cipitate a miniature Niagara down the unsuspecting neck. With 
the last of ner fiendish preparations completed, she went to 
bed, and s'help me! went to sleep with a clear conscience. 
Now, isn't that just like a woman. 

Her mate, in the meantime, was spending a very uneasy even- 
ing. With unerring intuition she sensed the sort of bad time 
her chum was having, and at last, confiding her fears to her 
sister, was urged by that generous lady by all means to go to 
the rescue. Slipping hurriedly into her things, she gathered up 
a perfectly nice man who had come to call on her, and quickly 
made tracks for home. Quietly unlocking the door, with a 
whispered invitation to him to follow, she stepped into the hall- 
way. But neither had proceeded very far when they stopped 



abrupt] "Something," she whispered shakily, "is sticking to 

my it 

ere," said he, and added: "Let's get into the living 
room an throw some light on the subject." Down the hall they 
crept, accumulating baggage with every foot of the way, and 
so finally, bewildered, came to the living room door hand in 
hand. As they pushed it open, there was a cataract of water, 
a wild scream and an oath, and then through the darkness be- 
hind them came a small, steady voice : "Make a move and I'll 
shoot." The lights flashed on, and there stood the burglar 
catcher in her little white nightie, with a wicked looking gun 
leveled at them. 

As I said before, this is a warning to burglars. If you will 
loot, go to a bachelor's apartment. You never can tell what a 
woman will do. 



Pears' 

Soap, like books, 
should be chosen 
with discretion. 
Both are capable of 
infinite harm. 

The selection of 
Pears' is a perfect 
choice and a safe- 
guard against soap 
evils. 

Matchless for the complexion. 

^fp\ Toyo Risen 
T* Kaisha 

(ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO.) 

S. S. Shinyo Maru (New) Saturday, August 3, 1912 

S. S. Chiyo Maru Saturday, August 31, 1912 

5. S. Nippon Maru Saturday. September 21. 1912 

i rmediate Service Saloon accommodations at reduced rates.) 
S. S. Tenyo Maru [via Manila direct) ...Friday. September 27, 1912 

Steamers sail from company's pier. No. 34. near foot of Brannan 
street. 1 p. m. for Yokohama and Hongkong, calling at Honolulu, 
Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hong- 
kong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

No cargo received on b">ard on day of sailing. 

Round trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For freight and passage apply at office, 4th floor. Western Metrop- 
olis National Bank Building, 625 Market street. 

W. H. AVERY, Assistant General Manager. 



THE LATEST STYLES IN 

Choice Woolens 

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12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 20, 1912. 




James K. Hackett, who comes to the Columbia Theatre July 22. His first play will be "The Grain of Dust," to 
be followed by other well-known plays. 





E. J. Ratcliffe, who will appear in David Belasco's produc- 
Lucia Lottie Collins, the talented daughter of a famous Hon of "The Drums of Oude," this Sunday matinee at the Or- 
mother, at the Pantages Theatre. pheum. 




Bessie Barriscale as Juanita in "The Rose of the Rancho," at the Alcazar. 




PL/E/ASURiE/S "WAND 

"We obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




msmm 



THEATRE TIPS. 
ALCAZAR. — "The Rose of the Rancho," with Bessie Barriscale 

as the particular star. Exceptionally fine. 
COLUMBIA. — Continued success of "Louisiana Lou." 
CORT. — Marvelous motion pictures. 
PANTAGES. — Seven vaudeville numbers of high order. 
EMPRESS.— "High Life in Jail" the leading feature. 
ORPHEUM.— 'The Battle Cry of Freedom," a Reno divorce 

story by May Tully, heads an excellent program. 
* * * 

"The Rose of the Rancho" at the Alcazar. 

When Bessie Barriscale was a regular member of the Alcazar 
forces, she had no more ardent admirer of her work than the 
writer. I went so far as to say that she was the cleverest in- 
genue that the theatre and company had had since its inception. 
Occasionally I would find some skeptics, one particular instance 
being one of my brother critics, who declared I had far over- 
rated the young lady. My faith in her, however, was lasting, 
and, as events have proved, she has fulfilled all that I ex- 
pected of her. She is to be featured with a big Eastern com- 
pany, which is but a step from being a real star, and this latter 
condition is but a matter of a short time, I am sure. There are 
several so-called clever actresses starring at the present time 
who do not in any sense compare in real acting worth with our 
own Bessie Barriscale. All the good things I have said about 
her, and all the good opinions I have formed of 
her, were but confirmed when I again witnessed 
her performance of Juanita in "The Rose of the 
Rancho" this week. Since Miss Barriscale left us 
she has achieved a big success in Los Angeles, 
and not as an ingenue either, but as a full-fledged 
leading lady. Down there in our Southern sister 
city they think that Miss Barriscale is wonderfully 
clever. A good many of us up here have thought 
the same for a long time, and this belief is 
strengthened and becomes a fact and a reality 
when we see the tremendous audiences which 
Miss Barriscale is drawing to the Alcazar this 
week, and so big has been her success in this pic- 
turesque play, in which we have seen her on sev- 
eral occasions, that the management announces 
that the play is to run a second week, which will, 
I regret to say, end the local engagement of the 
clever little lady, when she is to go East and do 
the role in "The Bird of Paradise," which she 
originated in Los Angeles, and which Laurette 
Taylor enacted in the East, where this play by 
the California playwright, Richard Walton Tully, 
scored a big success. 

It is a rather curious coincidence that Miss 
Taylor is to follow Miss Barriscale at the Alcazar 
in a very brief engagement. I could have wished 
that Miss Barriscale could have prolonged her en- 
gagement with us, and presented some of the suc- 
cesses she scored in Los Angeles. As Juanita, 
she is the same coy, sweet and demure and be- 
witching creature she has made familiar to us be- 
fore. She seems, however, to have broadened in 
her work, and to have a surer touch, which has 
Evidently been inspired by more confidence in 
herself. I feel positive that Miss Barriscale is 
going to make many of the wiseacres in the East 
sit up and take notice. She is deserving of all 
the success which can come to her. The old 
guard of the Alcazar nobly assists Miss Barriscale 
to round out an effective performance. Wesner 
is again seen as the old Padre. He gives a mel- 
lowperformance of this lovable role, which cannot 
be improved upon. He makes him a splendid 
figure, a performance which no character actor in 
America could play better. Louis Bennison is 



again seen as Kinkaid, and he certainly does make a great deal 
of the part. His performance is on a par with that of Wesner, 
and this means that he is great. A brother of Louis Bennison 
does the role of Don Luis, which Howard Hickman did so 
effectively before. Illness has prevented him from sharing in 
the local triumph of his wife, Miss Barriscale. Young Benni- 
son looks handsome and gives a conscientious rendition of the 
part, but he does not possess the ease of manner and the 
naturalness which were the distinguishing features of Hick- 
man's performance. Charles Gunn does fine as Lieutenant 
Larkin, being manly and sincere and handsome; the one fault 
I find is that when he returns from his desperate ride to secure 
aid to save the ranch he looks too immaculately clean. Other- 
wise he is fine. 

Walter Belasco does Ortega again, in which character he 
gives a brilliant performance. Viola Leach is very good as 
Trinidad, and makes a pretty figure. 

• * * 

Pantages Theatre. 

Monday evening I was initiated into the mysteries of popular 
price vaudeville. For years I had wondered exactly wherein 
and whereby this form of entertainment had been able to take 
such a hold of the theatre-loving public. Somehow or other 
I never could find the time or opportunity to attend one of these 
theatres. The other day my office chief advised me to take a 
glimpse of the happenings at Pantages Theatre, a representa- 
tive popular price vaudeville house. I went there wondering 




Blanche Duffield, the noted prima donna, who will be heard in"The Mikado" 
at the Cort Sunday night. 



July 20, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



and doubtful, and came away amazed. First of all, I found a 
very beautiful theatre, bright and commodious and cheerful, 
and modern in every possible essential which could be devised 
for the comfort of the theatre-goer. Long before eight o'clock 
the big theatre was practically jammed to its greatest capacity. 
I witnessed a program of acts which were uniformly fine, and, 
in some instances, of the very highest class and calibre. The 
opening number brought out Dolesch and Zillbauer, who ren- 
dered a number of popular airs on the big piano accordions 
which are becoming the vogue nowadays in vaudeville. They 
proved very popular, and the audience seemed appreciative to 
a degree. Next was seen Carl Rosine, a magician, who can 
hold his own with the very best. Many of his tricks are new, 
especially the clock mystery, which has everybody guessing. 
An appropriate setting added materially. It was a fine act. 
Next was Bond Morse, who, attired as a tramp, gave us a lot 
of jokes which were really new, and his singing and dancing 
were splendid. He held his audience to the very limit. 

The Romano Brothers presented an act in classical posings 
as fine as anything of the kind I have ever seen. With some 
solution they had smeared themselves with an entire cream 
colored coating, which gave them the appearance of marble 
figures. They are wonderfully formed men, and their work was 
a revelation. Clark and Verdi, who came next, style themselves 
Italian comedians. Their wit is new and unctuous, and their 
act is altogether novel. They certainly caught the favor of the 
audience. The next number was a tabloid musical comedy en- 
listing the services of ten or twelve people, and I was really 
surprised at the clever ensemble work of the company. The 
music was good, and the organization did not have a mediocre 
member, and one of the ladies — in fact, two of them — displayed 
voices far out of the ordinary. It was an all-round good num- 
ber, which was certainly well liked. 

The final number was a moving picture feature showing the 
recent Wolgast and Rivers pugilistic controversy of July 4th, 
which took place at Vernon, the capital of Los Angeles. The 
reels were followed with breathless interest, and when the 
popular champion at times rocked his adversary's cranium 
with his fists, the male part of the audience broke out into un- 
stinted applause, as if they were seeing the actual occurrence. 

* » * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Columbia Theatre. — James K. Hackett will begin an ex- 
tended engagement at the Columbia Theatre Monday night, 
July 22d. His new vehicle is a play made from a book, as 
many other of his successes have been, viz., "The Grain of 
Dust," by David Graham Phillips. During his season here Mr. 
Hackett will be seen in other plays, and will have associated 
with him many players whose names stand for the highest 
worth in the dramatic world. Among them will be E. M. Hol- 
land, Frazer Coulter, Brandon Tynan, Frank Burbeck, Joseph 
Herbert, Fred A. Sullivan, Charles Lane, Vaughan Trevor, 
Daniel Jarrett, Jr., Charles Force, Mrs. Thomas Whiffen, Bea- 
trice Beckley, Lily Cahill, Mabel Inslee, Elaine Inescourt, Eva 
Vincent, Wilda Mari Moore, Olive Oliver and others. "The 

Grain of Dust" will be the first offering. 

* » • 

Orpheum. — There will be seven new acts in next week's Or- 
pheum bill, and chief among them will be "The Drums of 
Oude," a one-act drama produced and presented by David Be- 
lasco. Its author is Austin Strong, and it packed the Duke of 
York Theatre, London, for two years. The story is weirdly 
thrilling, and every moment is tense with dramatic suspense, 
and when the climax comes with one of the most impressive 
battle scenes ever created by the masterly combination of ar- 
tistically used stage effects and the power of suggestion, an 
appeal is made to the enthusiasm of the audience that it finds 
it impossible to resist. The cast includes E. J. Ratcliffe, one 
of the finest leading actors on the American stage ; Jack Stand- 
ing, Harry Rose, John Thomson, W. S. Phillips, H. H. McCol- 
lum and Eleanor Scott L'Estelle. 

Stein, Hume and Thomas, who style themselves "The Melo- 
dious Merrymakers," also come next week. 

* • * 

Cort. — At the Cort Theatre, beginning Sunday evening, the 
New York Casino star cast, which includes DeWolf Hopper, 
Blanche Duffield, Eugene Cowles, George MacFarlane, Kate 
Condon, Arthur Aldridge, Viola Gillette, Arthur Cunningham, 



Alice Brady and Louise Barthel, are to commence their long- 
heralded season, limited to four weeks, of revivals of Gilbert 
and S.llivan's most popular works, with an elaborate produc- 
tion of "The Mikado," the bill for the entire first week. 

After the public has renewed its acquaintance with this de- 
licious travesty on Old Japan, another delight of our early days, 
"Pinafore," will be given, this opera being scheduled for the 
second week. On August 4th, "Patience" will have its turn, 

and later on "The Pirates of Penzance" will be offered. 

* * * 

Alcazar. — In compliance with popular demand, the Alcazar 
management has decided to retain Bessie Barriscale and "The 
Rose of the Rancho" a second week, commencing next Monday 
night, which will afford the positively last opportunities to see 
the charming little actress in the famous Belasco-Tully play. 

Pantages. — On Sunday there will be the usual change of bill, 
one of the many features being Jules B. Simon's Seven Aviator 
Girls, nifty singers and dainty dancers, headed by Miss Carlie 
Lowe, well known in musical comedy circles. "Happy's Mil- 
lions" is the title of a bright little sketch to be presented by 
William Morrow, Donna Harries and their tiny company, and 
is said to abound in cleverness from beginning to end. A fea- 
ture of especial interest to San Francisco will be the first ap- 
pearance upon the vaudeville stage of Estelle Allison, well- 
known in local society circles, and an actress of unusual ability. 

The First American appearance will be made of Lucia Lot- 
tie Collins, the famous English singing comedienne, and daugh- 
ter of Lottie Collins, who brought "Ta-ra-ra-ra-boom-de-ay" 
to America, and first made that song famous in this country. 



Pantages' Theatre 



Market street, opposite Maaon. 
Week of Sunday, July 21st. 

7 AVIATOR GIRLS, 
With CARLIB LOWE; WILLIAM MORROW & CO., Presenting 
"Happy's Millions;" AUSONIA TRIO, Olympic Gladiators; ES- 
TELLE ALLISON & CO., in her Musical Playlet, "The Question;" 
LUCIA LOTTIE COLLINS, English Singing Comedienne; SI 
JENKS, Yankee Comedian; Max Witt's 4 HARMONIOUS GIRLS, 
and SUNLIGHT PICTURES. 

Mat Daily at 2:30. Nights at 7:15 and 9:16. Sunday and Holiday 
Mats, at 1:30 and 3:30; Nights, continuous from 6:30. 



Orpheum 



O'Farrell Street, 
Bet. Stockton and Powell, 
Safest and most magnificent theatre In America. 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

A GREAT NEW SHOW. 

"THE DRUMS OF OUDE," a one-act drama by Austin Strong, 

presented and produced by DAVID BELASCO: LEW SULLY, the 

ir Minstrel; FOUR FLORIMONHS, Jugglers on Free Ladders; 

S HUME & THOMAS; SEALBY & DUCLOS; BERT TER- 

, El Y El GENE TRIO; NEW DAYLIGHT MOTION PICTURES. 

I & CO., In "THE BATTLE CRY OF FREE- 

Eventne prices. 10c, 25c, 50c, 76c Box seats, $1. Matinee prices 
md holidays), 10c, 25c, 50c Phones Douglas 70; 
Home C 1670. 

"^ r 1 • rm J. Corner Geary and Maaon »t». 

Columbia Theatre ^-nM.".. 1 "- 

Gottlob. Mam ft Co.. Managers. 

Beginning Monday. July 22d. Matinees Wednesdays and Saturdays. 
] prices at Wednesday mat., 25c. 50c, 75c and ?L Evenings 
and Saturday mat., $1.50 to 25c JAMES K. 

HACKETT, 
and his company of FAMOUS NEW YORK PLAYERS In the 
SramalfzatioTof David Graham Philip's story. "THE GRAIN OF 
DUST." 
No Sunday performances. 

— . , r-ryi 7 O'Farrell Street. 

AlfniyftV IhPffT'VP. Bet. Powell and Mason. 
JXiLU/iCU/f J. IVfylA/l/l t> phones: Kearny V. Home C 446«. 
Belasco ft May^r. Owners and Managers. 

Monday evening. July 22d. begins the second and final week of 
BESSIE B\RRISCALE. assisted by the Alcazar Company, In 
David Belasco and Richard Walton Tuliys famous play of early 
California, 

THE ROSE OF THE RANCHO. 
A magnificent pictorial production. 
Prices— Night, 25c to Jl; matinee, 26c. to 60c. 
Mat. Thursday, Saturd ay. Sunday. 

~^Z ; rm j Leading attractions only. 

I Vwr I hOflT'VP Ellis and Market streets. 

L/CJA V ±IVt>U/VIZ/ phone— Sutter 2460. 

T ist time to-night, Paul J. Ralney's African Hunt Pictures. 

Belinntag to-morrow (Sunday) night. THE NEW YORK CASINO 
ST \R CAST- De Wolf Hopper. Blanche DufBeld. Kate Condon, 
Viola Gillette. Alice Brady. Geo. MacFarlane. Arthur Aldridge. Ar- 
thur Cunningham. Louise Barthel. Eugene Cowles in a revival fes- 
tival of Gilbert & Sullivan's greatest comic operas, presenting for 
the flrst week, 

"THE MIKADO." 
Second week— H. M. S. Pinafore." with productions of "Patience" 
and "The Pirates of Penzance" to follow. 
Prices— 60c. to J300. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 20, 1912. 



r5*r 







The marriage of Jennie Crocker and Malcolm Whitman will 
always be a sweet and fragrant memory in the imagination of 
the three hundred guests who were bidden to the festivities. 

But alas and alack! for many a day it will be a bitter and 
acidulated memory in the imagination of the three hundred who 
were not bidden to the festivities. And of these there are at 
least ten who will by day have to practice don't-care, indifferent 
expressions, who will have to make nightly poultices on the sen- 
sitive places in their dispositions, and in spite of all this com- 
posure and care, I doubt whether many of their friends will be 
convinced that the slight glanced off without even a surface 
scratch. 

When Miss Crocker announced her bridesmaids, the gossips 
who sniff the very air for trouble threw back their ears and 
took up the scent. Those who inhabit a zone abutting on that 
in which Jennie Crocker and her most intimate friends move 
and have their being had already a suspicion that the fair but 
firm little heiress had lessened the population of her zone. They 
knew that in the involuntary hegira had gone one dashing young 
woman who at one time had been a close enough friend of the 
heiress to have been numbered as a prospective bridesmaid 
whenever marriage bells should ring for Jennie Crocker. 

The bride was determined to have comparatively few people 
at her wedding. As usual, she displayed originality in the 
pruning of the list. There are families here that began to spin 
the social fabric when the Crockers were drawing the golden 
threads through the warp, and the silver of the Comstock pol- 
ished the woof of the magic carpet. In many of these families 
there are young people of the age of the bride, but they do not 
chance to be very congenial to Jennie Crocker. When the 
framers of the first invitation list presented it to her for rati- 
fication, she drew the blue pencil through the names of the 
young people who were there by right of position and family 
tradition, and she made up a new list with the dowagers repre- 
senting the rich and honored families, and only the young peo- 
ple who were her bright particulars went down on the list. In 
many instances where there was no intimacy, only one of a 
family clan was bidden, and in other cases half a dozen mem- 
bers were invited, like the E. W. Hopkinses and all their mar- 
ried daughters and son. As a matter of course a list that is 
pruned and trimmed and shaved down to three hundred, in a 
community where six hundred invitations are frequently sent 
out without noticeable injury to the smart and exclusive effects, 
has some sharp edges that cut and hurt. But this little bride 
is just enough of a Pooh-Bah to have her wedding her own 
sweet way, and let the left-outs take care of themselves. 
© © S 

The moving picture feature of this wedding proves that in 
future an airship will have to be employed to obtain a complete 
series of successful films. Dirigible balloons and biplanes 
have been employed in photographing wild animals who would 
seem tame compared to the fighting, elbowing mob that from 
all accounts stormed the outside of the church, snatched the 
bride bald of orange blossoms, beat each other with parasols in 
a frantic endeavor to get a closer view, and trampled over the 
machine of the moving picture man, making it impossible for 
him to operate. 

O. Henry has written a classic about the rubberneck variety 
of human who has so much "caoutchouc in the cosmogony of 
his neck," and who would trample over a cooing baby to find 
out why a crowd is gathered in a spot. The hero and heroine 
of this classic together almost make a corner in rubber, so natu- 
rally, having met in a stampede outside a fashionable wedding, 
they stampede to the altar. A rubber complexion cannot suf- 
fuse with blushes, and the rubber variety of being has no sense 
of humor, so O. Henry's story would neither reform nor amuse 
them. 

© © © 

The outdoor setting made a lovely background for the wed- 
ding breakfast, and it was natural that comparisons should be 



PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street in the c«nter of the city. 
Take any Market Street Car from the Ferry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The most beautifully situated of any City Hotel 
in the world. 

Take the Sacramento Street Cars from the Ferry 
Two Great Hotels Under the Management of the 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



made between this event and the marriage of Helene Irwin and 
Templeton Crocker. It was unanimously agreed that the former 
wedding was not such a picture affair as this, despite the lavish 
decorations of the stately Irwin home. A town wedding cannot 
possibly achieve the fascinating natural beauty of an al fresco 
affair, so small wonder that Tuesday's wedding won more en- 
comiums. Women in thin, float-away gowns, flitting between 
trees and flowers, garlanded the background of Tuesday, with 
the pretty blonde little bride trailing the ivory satin length of 
her gown across the sun-dappled foreground. 

The bride is diminutive compared to most strapping Cali- 
fornia girls, but at her wedding she was never for a moment 
overshadowed by mere inches, always remaining the central 
figure of the affair. Hers was the only gown with a train, the 
guests for the most part wearing frocks that cleared the ground 
— only a few touching all around. The bride was in her most 
sunshiny mood, and when she and her stalwart six-footer of a 
husband made a dash for the bedecked and bedizened limou- 
sine, with characteristic spirit Jennie Crocker Whitman, always 
a good shot, showered Walter Martin with rice she had con- 
cealed in the pocket of her going away gown. 
© © © 

Henry T. Scott is beaming, and the beam rests on the fact 
that the bride and groom went up to the McCloud for their first 
honeymooning. The McCloud River is the most beautiful river 
in California. If you don't believe it, ask Henry T. Scott. The 
scenery around the Country Club is the best behaved, nicest 
scenery to get along with anywhere in California. If you don't 




Swimming Costumes and 
Sweater Coats 

for men and women represent the 
utmost in smartness, style, fit, dura- 
bility and sterling values. 



Women's Bathing Suits S2 to S35 
Men's Bathing Suits SI. 25 to S7.S0 
Women's Sweater Coats $1.45 to S2S 
Men's Sweater Coats S3 to $8.50 



Also Headquarters for the Famous 

Line of 

"G & M" Hosiery 
"G & M" Underwear 

You know our qualities. 




GRANT AVE. AT POST ST. 







July 20, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



believe it, ask Henry T. Scott. He hasn't a thing to sell up 
there; he hasn't a thing to gain by insisting that Nature is at 
her loveliest right there, and the sad part of it is that although 
he has gone right on insisting to his family, neither Mrs. Henry 
T. nor the Walter Martins, nor the Scott boys, rise to father's 
superior heights of enthusiasm. For example, the Walter Mar- 
tins leased a place in Napa County for the summer, though 
father said — but we know what father said. 

But along came Whitman, and father told him all about what 
Nature does when she gets around Shasta, and Whitman said 
he'd like to go and see for himself, and Jennie was agreeable, 
so they secured a couple of hunting licenses with the marriage 
license, and now Henry T. Scott beams when any one asks him 
where the young couple went, so of course every one knows that 
they could only go to one place which would make Henry T. 
beam like that. 



The variable and sudden changes of temperature of the 

bay counties is very trying to many persons, as they meet with 
considerable difficulty in finding the proper kind of undergar- 
ment that will at once be agreeable and comfortable in adapt- 
ing itself to the alternating winds and fogs and sunny skies. 
Years of experience and severe tests have demonstrated that 
there is only one garment to meet successfully these prevailing 
climatic conditions, and that is the Dr. Deimel linen mesh un- 
derwear. It is the garment par excellence for wear next the 
skin, at once agreeable and healthful. It is carefully devised 
on purely hygienic lines, so as to expeditiously absorb and 
evaporate the moisture of the skin. Linen has always been re- 
garded as the ideal and cleanest of the fabric materials for 
underwear, but it failed to command success and popularity 
till Dr. Deimel discovered his celebrated method of weaving a 
similar yarn of vegetable origin into the now well-known and 
widely-used "linen mesh," which, through its perfect absorp- 
tion properties, acts as a tonic on the skin and imparts a sense 
of delight to the body seeking the acme of cleanliness and com- 
fort. People who are subject to colds and those with impaired, 
weak skins which develop catarrh, bronchitis and pneumonia, 
will find prompt relief in linen mesh underwear. Try a suit as 
designed by Dr. Deimel, and you will forever discard the obso- 
lete and unhealthful woolens. Linen mesh is no more expensive 
than other superior underwear. At the Deimel branch store. 
No. 176 Sutter street, just below Kearny, besides a full line of 
linen mesh underwear for women, children and men, they have 
a wonderful assortment of linen handkerchiefs which they have 
recently imported. 



The well established firm of Treat & Eacret has drawn 

a lucky prize by making a combination with George R. Shreve, 
who has severed his connection with Shreve & Co., a corpora- 
tion in which he had been interested for thirty years, and whose 
president he was for fifteen years. Mr. Shreve has become 
identified with Treat & Eacret, jewelers and silversmiths, with 
a big store at 136 Geary street. Application has gone to Sac- 
ramento for permission to change the corporation name of 
Treat & Eacret to Shreve, Treat & Eacret. 

Treat & Eacret has been in existence since November 4th of 
last year. The controlling interest in the company has been 
held by Walter P. Treat and Godfrey Eacret. Treat, prior to 
going into the new company, was twenty-three years with 
Shreve & Co., and Eacret was with the big concern thirteen 
years. Both are prominent in business circles. The new com- 
bination of Shreve, Treat & Eacret will, it is believed, be a 
strong one. Shreve's father, George C. Shreve, founded Shreve 
& Company. Among the plans of the reorganized company is 
the enlargement of the Geary street store. 

"The enlargement of this company simply is in answer to the 
call for another jewelry company of this class to meet the won- 
derful growth and prosperity of San Francisco," said Walter P. 
Treat this week. "The growth of any other company or com- 
panies in the same line of business will not be impeded by the 
activities of Shreve, Treat & Eacret, because the new San Fran- 
cisco gives all a great field for development. This we have 
demonstrated to our own satisfaction since Treat & Eacret has 
been in existence." 



Italian-Swiss Colony wines are the standards from which 

others are judged. Why don't you try their TIPO (red or 
white) and be convinced? 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Turkish Baths 
13th Floor 

Ladies' Hair Dressing Parlors 
2d Floor 
Cafe 

White and Gold Restaurant 
Lobby Floor 
Electric Grill 
Barber Snop 
Basement. Geary St reet Entrance 

Under the management of James Woods 



HOTEL SUTTER 



Cor. Sutter and Kearny 



San Francisco 



In the center of retail and wholesale shopping 

district. 
New, modern, up-to-date and fire-proof. 
250 rooms— single or en suite. Rates SI. 50 

per day and upwards. 
Take any taxicab from Ferry or Railway 

depots at expense of the hotel. 
Cater to patrons of the famous Occidental 

and Lick Hotels of ante-1906 days. 

Excellent Cafe in connection Merchants Lunch 50c 

Table d'Hote Dinner with Wine $1.00 



HOTEL MONTGOMERY 



Fireproof 



San Jose's Newest Hotel 



Rates $1.00 and up 
F. J. McHENRY, Manager 



European Plan 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

DEL MONTE 

PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL 

PACIFIC GROVE 

Arrange to spend your summer months on the Monterey Peninsula. 
No spot in California offers so much as does Del Monte, Monterey and 
Pacific Grove with its beautiful mountain scenery, drives, and par- 
ticularly the unexcelled grassy course of the 

Del Monte Golf & Country Club 

Both hotels under the same management. 
Write for rates, literature, etc., to 

H. R. WARNER, Del Monte, California 




Continuous Eye Rest 
and Eye Comfort 




Mr. Gt-u. Mayerle. San Francisco. 

Dear Sir — 1 wore the glasses you made for me 12 years continu- 
ously, which I consider something wonderful, and can heartily rec- 
ommend you to any one In need of glasses. Also the new pair you 
Just made suit me fine. Tours truly, 

M. A. MORGAN. 
417 South Gates St. Los Angeles, Cal. January 15, 1912. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Optician. 
Charter Member American Association of Opticians. 
960 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 
Mayerle's Eyewater, the Great Eye Tonic, freshens and 
strengthens the eye. Sent by mall on receipt of 65c. 

Mayerle's Antiseptic Eyeglass Wipers (a chemical cloth), 3 for 26c. 



Gourauds Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty Uttie booklet of exquisitely perfumed powdered leaves t» 
carry In thfl purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 
prove the jomp'exion. Sent for 10 cents in stamps or coin. F. T. Hop- 
kins. 37 Great Jones St. N. T. 




, ;; ;V ' ' •„■. - ' . ' ' . . . 'T~ 




'.:■&&&&&'&■■:■' ..^-v^-i-."/ 



Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear (n the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 

BROWN-BURCIvHALTER.— Mr. and Mrs. B. S. Brown of Berkeley have 
announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss Zena Pearl Brown, 
to Charles "William Burckhalter of San Francisco. 

DINKLAGE-LAUTENSCHLAGER.— Mrs. J. Dinklage announces the en- 
gagement of her daughter, Miss Lela Elsie, to F. F. Lautenschlager, 
Jr., of Seattle. 

EDISES-BLUM. — Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Edises announce the engagement 
of their daughter, Mildred, to Jean Blum. They will be at home to 
their friends Sunday afternoon, August 4th, from 2 to 5 p. m., at 2068A 
Market street. 

HICKS-GROSS. — An engagement of interest to local society is that of Miss 
Elizabeth Hick*, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hicks, of Los An- 
geles, and Lieutenant Robert Frank Gross, U. S. N., which has been 
formally announced. The bride-to-be has often been a visitor here, 
and has many friends among the younger girls. 

KRESTILLER-GOLD. — The engagement is announced of Miss Helen G, 
Krestiller and Louis Mark Gold. Miss Krestiller and Mr. Gold will re- 
ceive on the remaining Friday afternoons and evenings of this month. 

KIRBY-WILLIAMSON.— Miss Claribel Kirby, daughter of Mrs. C. H. 
Kirby, announced her engagement to David G. Williamson during a 
house party at the summer home of Mrs. D. E. W. Williamson on the 
Russian River. 

LIPMAN-FINK. — Mrs. F. Llpman announces the engagement of her 
daughter, Miss Tillie, to Nathan Fink of Vallejo. 

WOOLSEY-ROBSON. — The engagement of Miss Frances Shattuck Wool- 
sey and Mr. Frederick T. Robson is announced. Miss Woolsey is a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William E. Woolsey of Berkeley. Mr. Rob- 
son Is a son of Mrs. N. C. Robson of Berkeley. 

WEDDINGS. 

AUNE-PARTINGTON.— Miss Inger Aune became the bride of John Allan 
Partington on Wednesday evening at 9 o'clock, the wedding ceremony 
being performed at the home of the bride's parents. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pedar Aune, in Waller street. 

BOSTWICK-CARPENTER — Miss Guadaloupe Carroll Bostwh-k and Wes- 
ley Carpenter were married last Friday In the Centenary Methodist 
Church. The Rev. J. W. Horn officiated. 

CLEARY-LOCKYER. — Miss Mary Margaret Cleary and Mr. R. Lockyer 
were married last week in St. James Church by the Rev. J. B. Brad- 
ley. Miss Elizabeth Cleary attended the bride. Jos. McGuire was best 
man. A reception at the Cleary home followed the ceremony. 

EATON-ARCHER. — Announcements are being received by friends around 
the bay of the marriage of Miss Nelda Eaton and W. H. Archer. The 
wedding was a quiet affair. 

FOORMAN-MOHR.— A beautifully appointed wedding took place at 3123 
Jackson street, where Miss Henrietta Foorman became the bride of 
Selby Mohr recently. 

HARTMAN-KLANG.— Miss Victoria N. Hartman became the bride of Leon 
Klang on the Fourth at a quiet wedding at the home of her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Sig. Hartman in Bush street. 

HOFFMAN-LOEFFLER.— Miss Alice Florence Hoffman, daughter of Mrs. 
Sellgman Hoffman, was united in marriage to Emil M. Loeffier Sun- 
day at the country residence of her sister, Mrs. Samuel Meyer, in Ross. 

LANGHORNE- PARKER. — Miss Julia Langhorne and Lieutenant James 
Parker will be married at St. Luke's Episcopal Church on September 
the 14th. 

LAYMANCE-HEILBRON.— Miss Hazel Laymance and Mr. Harold Heil- 
bron of Sacramento will be married on September 4th. Miss Dorothy 
Taft and Miss Grace Laymance will be in the biidal party. 

MILLER-FORD. — Miss Marian Miller and Mr. Bernard Ford will be mar- 
ried at the C. O. G. Miller home In Pacific avenue on September 11th. 

TOWLE-WILLIAMS.— The marriage of Mrs. Nellie Prewett Towle and 
Arthur L. Williams took place Monday evening at the Hotel St. Fran- 
cis, the Rev. William Rader officiating. Mrs. S. Keys Smith of Sac- 
ramento, and Mr. H. W. Cullen attended the bridal couple. Judge 
James S. Prewett, of Auburn, father of the bride, gave her away. 
LUNCHEONS. 

CROCKER.— Mr. and Mrs. William Whitman, Miss M. S. Whitman and 
Mr. Malcolm Whitman formed an informal luncheon party which 
Miss Jennie Crocker entertained on two occasions at the Hotel St. 
Francis during the week. 

DOE. — Miss Marguerite Doe, who is visiting at Santa Barbara, gave a 
luncheon during the week for Miss Edith Rucker. 

HUETER— Mrs. Ernest L. Hueter entertained for Miss Olga Jungbluth 
on Friday, giving a handsome luncheon. 

LOWE.— Miss Edith Lowe was the honored guest at a luncheon and card 
party given last Saturday by Miss Elise Partridge at her home in 
California street. 

MORAN. — Mrs. William M. Moran gave a luncheon recently in honor of 
Mrs. Rose A. Moran at her summer home in San Ansr-imo. 

RAY.— Miss Nina Blow was the motif of a luncheon given recently by 
Mrs. Ray at her quarters at the Navy Yard. A number of friends 
from town were present. 

SAMPLE.— Major and Mrs. Sample gave a pretty buffet luncheon during 
the week in honor of General Schuyler. 



SCOTT. — Mr. Henry T. Scott was host at a luncheon at the Pacific Union 

Club In honor of Mr. Malcolm D. Whitman. 
ST. GOAR. — Miss Lowe was the guest of honor at a luncheon given on 

Monday by Miss Erna St. Goar at her home on California street. 

DINNERS. 

CANARIS. — Mr. Arthur and Miss Irma Canaris last week gave a prettily 
appointed surprise dinner in honor of the birthday of their sister, Miss 
Tita J. Canaris, at their home, 1727 Hayes street. 

CHAPPELEAR. — Captain and Mrs. Louis Chappelear gave a dinner on 
Friday night at their home in the Presidio. 

CHESEBROUGH.— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Chesebrough entertained at din- 
ner on Saturday evening in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Alexander 
of New York, and the Misses Harriett and Janetta Alexander. 

CROCKER. — Mr. and Mrs. Templeton Crocker gave a dinner recently at 
Uplands, entertaining the Crocker-Whitman party. 

DARGIE. — Mrs. Herminle Peralta Dargie gave a musicale and dinner re- 
cently at her home In Oakland in honor of Congressman Joseph Know- 
land. 

JONES. — Miss Nina Jones entertained recently in honor of Miss Innes 
Kconey, giving an elaborate dinner at the Hotel Potter, Santa Bar- 
bara. 

MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin gave a dinner recently in honor of Miss 
Janet von Sehroeder, who is in town for a fortnight's stay. 

TITUS, — Mr. an 1 Mrs. Louis Titus gave a dinner recently at their home in 
Oakland. 

MUSI GALES, 

FARNHAM. — A musicale was given recently by Dr. and Mrs. Daniel C. 
Farnham at their home In Jones street, in honor of their guest, Miss 
Julia Harris, who Is a visitor here from Nashville, Tenn. 

TEAS. 
PAYNE. — Mrs. Redmond Payne entertained at a tea recently at her home 
in Mountain View. Her sister, Mrs. BJornsted, who has recently ar- 
rived from the East, was the guest of honor. 

HOUSE PARTIES. 

MOORE. — Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Moore gave a large house party recently 

at their home near Santa Cruz. 
McCUTCHEON.— Mrs. Edward McCutcheon entertained a delightful house 

party last week at her home In Gaston. 
W1LSHIRE. — Miss Doris Wilshlre entertained a large house party over 

the week-end, her guests enjoying tea with her on Sunday at the 

Lagunitas Country Club. 

MOTORING. 
BANCROFT.— Mr. and Mrs. Philip Bancroft are motoring through the 

northern part of the State, slopping at all the places of interest on the 

trip. They will go South In two weeks, to remain until the end of 

July. 
BRESSE. — Mrs. Eugene Bresse, Miss Metha McMahon and Miss Franc 

Pierce have returned from a motor trip to Southern California. 
PEKK1NS. — Paymaster Fred Perkins and Mrs. Perkins have returned to 

their pretty quarters at Yerba Buena after an automobile trip of 

several weeks through Mendocino and Lake Counties. 
WATT. — William Watt and a party of friends, who have been enjoying a 

motor tour in Napa Valley, have returned to San Francisco. 

ARRIVALS. 

ALEXANDER. — Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Alexander and their daughters, Har- 
riett and Janetta Alexander, who crossed the continent in their 
private car, have arrived, and are at the Fairmont. The Misses 
Alexander came West to act as bridesmaids at the wedding of their 
cousin, Miss Jennie Crocker, and Malcolm Whitman. 

VAN AKSDALE— Mrs. Nellie Van Arsdale has returned to her home, 
"Uklgewood," In Mendocino County, after having spent several days 
in San Francisco. The marriage of Mrs. Van Arsdale and Matthew 
Harris will take place quietly In the fall. 

BRINEGAR. — Mrs. Edgar P. Brlnegar, who has been visiting Mrs. Wil- 
liam Bourn, Sr., and Mrs. James Ellis Tucker, at St. Helena, has re- 
turned to town. 

BIDWELL. — Mrs. Aiinie K. Bidwell is here from Chlco, visiting friends. 

DAVIS.— Willis Davis has arrived from the East, where he has been 
attending college, and has joined his sister, Miss Sydney Davis, in 
Santa Barbara. 

COLEMAN. — Miss Janet Coleman, who has been the guest of her sister, 
Mrs. Franklin Zane, in her attractive country seat, near Woodslde, 
returned to her home in California street during the week. 

CROCKER. — Mrs. William H. Crocker, accompanied by Miss Ethel and 
Miss Helen Crocker and William H. Crocker, Jr., arrived on Tuesday 
from the East and Europe. 

CHIPMAN. — Judge and Mrs. N. P. Chipman of Sacramento are visiting 
in this city. They will be the guests of Mrs. William Hood in her 
home In Broadway for several weeks. 

CUNNINGHAM. — Mrs. James Cunningham and the Misses Sara. Mary 
and Elizabeth Cunningham, who came out from New York to spend 
part of the season in Santa Barbara, have returned to town for an 
indefinite stay. 

CUSHING.— Mrs. Sydney B. Cushing, accompanied by Miss Charlotte 
Land, has returned from the East. 

FOSTER. — Miss Martha Foster, who has been a guest at the Von Shroeder 
home, has returned to her home In San Rafael. 



July 20, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



FLETCHER.— Mrs. James Fletcher, the former U is hero 

on a visit from her home In I and Is the guest of her grand- 

mother, Mrs. Simeon Weoban, at her home In ; 
FITZGERALD.— Mr. Harold Flttgerald, Of New STork, i for the 

Crocker-Whitman wedding, at which he will be best 
HUNTINGTON.— Mr. and Mrs. Howard Huntington, of Los Angeles, and 

Mr. and Mrs. John Brockway Metcalf, are visiting their mother, 

Mary A. Huntington, in Maple street. 
JAOWIX. — Mr. and Mrs. Donald Judwiti returned to the City on U 

and are guests of Mrs. Jadwin's grandmother, Mrs. Anna L. Bauer, at 

her home in Pacific avenue. 
HOUSTON. — Mrs. William Grenwoll Houston b iramento 

during the week, and will r 
HEWITT. — Mr. and Mrs. Dlxwell Hewitt, who have been abroad Tor some 

time, returned home during the week, and will spend the rest of the 

summer in the city. 
KEENEY. — Miss Innea Keeney has returned to Miramar after a brief 

stay at Byron with Dr. and Mrs. Lewis Risdon Mead. 
LOGAN. — Mrs. Burkette Logan of Los Angeles is visiting Mrs. James II. 

Fannin at Presidio Terrace. 
McQUTSTAN. — Mrs. A. L. McQuistan is here from Salt Lake City visiting 

her mother, Mrs. Alfred Castle, at the Keystone Apartments. 
MILLER. — Mr. and Mrs. Christian Miller have returned from Virginia, 

where they have been for the past few months visiting Mrs. Miller's 

parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Rinehart, at Covington. 
NAPHTHALT. — Mrs. Samuel L. Naphthaly and her mother, Mrs. Gerst, 

are home from Del Monte. 
PRYOR. — Mr. and Mrs Basil Pryor came here from Fresno with their 

young son this week, and are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 

James in Fillmore street. 
RUTHERFORD. — Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Rutherford have returned from 

a visit of several days at the Hotel Vendome in San Jose. 
RIDELL. — Mrs. George Ridell, who, for the last three weeks, has been 

enjoying a vacation in Glenn County, has returned t>> her apartments 

in this city. 
TEVIS. — Mr. and Mrs. William Tevis and their sons came down from 

their summer villa at Tahoe to attend the Crocker-Whitman wedding. 
WHETSLER. — Dr and Mrs. Benjamin Ide Wheeler, who have been in the 

East for several weeks, are home. 

DEPARTURES. 
AVERY. — Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Avery sailed recently on the Tenyo Maru 

for Yokohama, and will remain in the Orient for several weeks before 

returning to their home in this city. 
ALEXANDER. — Leo and Michael Alexander are enjoying a visit to Yel- 
lowstone Park. 
BUTTERS. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Butters and their niece. Miss Lois 

Crosby, have left for Europe. 
BROWN. — Mrs. C. Elwood Brown will sail for Europe to-morrow, where 

she anticipates spending several months. 
DRUMM.— Mr. and Mrs. John Drumm, who haw been in Ross for the 

summer, are spending the week-end in Burlingame with Mr. Drumm's 

brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. William Greer Hitchcock, in 

San Mateo. 
DE SABLA.— Mr. and Mrs. Eugene de Sabla are in Paris, where they have 

apartments at the Ritz. The Misses Vera and Leontine de Sabla, 

who accompanied Mr. and Mrs. Ciement Tobin upon their recent visit 

to London, have rejoined their parents. 
DE MARVILLE. — Miss Cora de Marville has returned to her home in 

Rue de Chaillot, Paris, after a visit with friends in Rome. 
GRAVES. — Mrs. Robert N, Graves, accompanied by her two grandsons. 

Melville and Robert White, have left for Palo Alto, where they will 

remain a month. 
GANTNER. — Mr. and Mrs. John O. Gantner and their family have gone to 

Santa Cruz for a fortnight, 
i IiriRARDELLI. — Miss Corona Ghirardelli is the guest of Major and Mrs. 

Wright, touring the Yellowstone Park, She tain about a 

month. 

iiopkins. Mi. and Mrs. Samuel Hopkins, a bril- 

Hant social ■.■>. enl of a few \\ eeks ago, are In ■ ■ ir« 



Mlse Myrtle Howell leaves shortly for V>w 
The Misses Virginia and g* n trude Jolliffe are at their 
in Soi County i'o 

I Hayes has 

.ind Mr:;. Man SUA i s visiting friends In Bos- 

' there until th nth. 

n Roife has gono to Reno, whore for several weeks she 
will bf the guest of her son. Harry Rolfe, who Is practicing law in 
that 

i . Scott spent the as the 

guest of his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Martin. 

William B. Tevis left recently for her villa at Tahoe Lake. 

'■ I " ■ ■■ " I Weill has lual liter an interesting 

trip through the Suez Canal, Italy and along the Mediterranean. He 

Will be abroad .for some time longer, visiting friends In i'- 

INTIMATIONS. 

ACKERMAN*.— The Lloyd Ackerm.in family have taken an apartment at 

the Casa Del Rey for the summer. 
BICKNELL.— Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Bicknell, who have been enjoying a 
honeymoon trip in the Yosemite, returned recently. 
(Continued to Page 22.) 




Booth's 

CRESCENT BRAND 

Sardines 



The Sardine that is dis- 
tinguished from all by 
its superior food value 
and flavor. 

A Pound Can 20c, Everywhere 

A Home Product of the Highest Merit 

Packed in the famous Bay of Monterey 



(- 


" "> 


George R. Shreve 




Having severed his connection with 

Shreve and Co. announces that he is 

now associated with 




TREAT & EACRET 




Jewelers and Silversmiths 
136 GEARY STREET 


^ 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 20, 1912. 



byrne & McDonnell 

MEMBERS 
New York Stock Exchange 

New York Cotton Exchange 

Chicago Board of Trade 

Securities Bought and Sold on Commission 

STOCKS, BONDS, COTTON AND GRAIN 

Private Wires to Chicago and New York 

H. L. MACK, Resident Partner F. TH1ER10T, Manager 

409 Pine Street, San Francisco 



ON JULY 1, 1912 

We will move our offices to 410 Montgomery Street 

Our Facilities for handling 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

Will be considerably increased 

Established 1858 

SUTRO & CO. 



Telephone Sutter 3434 



Private Exchange Connecting all Depts. 



H. ZADIG 

Member 
Merchants' Exchange 



E. P. bARRETT 

Member 
S. F. Stock Exchange 



ZADIG & CO 



STOCK BROKERS 



324 Bush St., San Francisco. Cal. 



Phone Kearny 1725 



Your stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY 
Let us guide you in your selections 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importers of and Dealers in 
THE HIGHEST CLASS P APRR FOR OFFICE STATIONERY 
Battery and Jackson Streets San Francisco, Cal. 



SAVES TIME and ENERGY 
Lightens All Housework 

SAPOLIO 

Cleans, Scours, Polishes from Cellar to Garret 

WORKS WITHOUT WASTE 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

__. PHYSICIANS. 

Dr. W. P. Agnew has moved his office to this city, and Is now to be 
found In Room 424, Flood Building. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. All legal papers drawn up accurately. 
107 Montgomery street, near Sutter, San Francisco. "Phone Douglas 601 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Fell 9911. 

~~ DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St., now at room 403 
Westbank Building, corner Kills and Market. 

ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW. 
Samuel L. Shortrldge, AUorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
clsco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rlegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 
Bunions and In-growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment 
206-206 Wwstbank Buildlne. 830 Market street. San FranciBco. 

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP. 
Notice is hereby given that the partnership heretofore existing between 
L. H. BILL and B. I. BILL, und n name of L. H. & B. I. BILL, 

doing business at No. 543 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco, California, 
is dissolved by mutual consent, L, H. Bill retiring from said business. 
B. I. Bill will continue said business, and pay and collect all indebtedness 
due by or to said firm. 

L. H. BILL. 
(Sft&l) B. I. BILL. 




FINANCIAL 




Belmont, which for a long period 
Mining Share Market, has steadfastly remained above the 

$10 mark despite the ups and downs 
of the rest of the market, shocked its shareholders this week 
by suddenly dropping close to $9. It developed that the slump 
was caused by an Eastern shareholder selling a big block of 
stock in order to raise funds to escape from a financial squeeze. 
The drop had no effect on the rest of the Tonopah group, and 
prices continued irregular within narrow margins. Its new mill 
continues to reach all expectations. Midway has cut into a 
promising vein of ore on one of the upper levels, and has again 
joined the shipping class, periodically. Merger Mines, Gold- 
field Con. and Florence developed a better tone during the 
week. Florence has found a vein of ore on the 250 level which 
is proving of such good value that it is being saved to mix later 
on with lower grade ore for milling purposes. As a whole, the 
week's market was narrow under light trading. Most of the 
Comstocks advanced a few points, with Mexican and Belcher 
leading, but the gains were inconsequential. The unwatering 
movement through the new big pumps goes steadily on, and a 
few months is expected to uncover some very interesting ground 
for development. 



Local Stocks 
And Bonds. 



Since the Stock and Bond Exchange 
reopened for business after the 
Fourth of July adjournment, the vol- 
ume of business, especially in 
bonds, has been very encouraging. The new and sudden de- 
mand was occasioned by the July disbursements of dividends, 
estimated at some $10,000,000, seeking reinvestment. A large 
part of this money has already found its way into local bonds, 
and the month's sales will undoubtedly be a record-breaker. 
Heavv transactions have been recorded in Great Western Power 
5's, Oro Electric, Northern Electric, Pacific Tel. & Tel. S's, S. P. 
Refundings, Spring Valley 5's, Pacific Gas & Electric and 
United Railways. In stocks, Giant Powder reached 100, Hut- 
chinson and Onomea Sugars have reached new high figures on 
the present climb, Alaska Packers on prospects of an unusually 
good season. Bonds easily led in the volume of transactions, 
and the demand for them has been steady and prices firm. The 
water stocks suffered a slight recession, but there were very 
few top-heavy spots punctuating the week's list. Associated 
Oil was very quiet at 43%, and showed no signs of its recent 
lively flurry. 



The biggest recent bond sale in the 
Great Highway Bonds. State was the marketing of $1,200,- 

000 sinking fund 4's of the issue 
of $18,000,00 made by the State of California to build the 
Great Highway. The most of the offering went at par and 
accrued interest, the State Board of Control taking the larger 
share. F. W. Halsey & Co., Rollins & Co. and the Bond De- 
partment of the Anglo and London-Paris National Bank took 
several hundred thousand dollars each. The rest were with- 
drawn, to be offered later, when the State Treasurer expects to 
receive a higher bid. The financial statement of California 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



Members 



(" New 

) New 

\ Cbio 

i. Tie 



Main Office 
MILLS BUILDING 

Sin Franciico, Cllifornia 



York Stock Eicb.me 
York CoIIod Exchange 
ieago Boird of Trade 
Stock and Bond Exchange, Sao Francisco 



Braach Office, 



Los Angeles Sao Diego 
Corooado Beach Portlaod. Ore. 
Seattle. Wash. Vancouver, B. C. 



July 20, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



shows an assessed valuation of $2,603,296,264, and the out- 
standing debt of three issues of bonds so far on the market is 
only $4,600,000. Of the Highway bonds of $18,000,000; only 
$1,600,000 have been marketed to date. They are available as 
security for postal savings, for deposits of State, County and 
Municipal Funds, and are legal investment for savings banks 
and trust funds. 



According to Zadig & Co.'s last market letter on the min- 
ing market, Tonopah looks as though it will be a long lasting 
camp, and any one who cares to invest in mining shares ought 
to buy Tonopah shares now. There was a time when there was 
quite a prejudice against purchasing shares in silver mines for 
fear that silver would go very low in case of a very large pro- 
duction, but there is no danger on that score now. The great 
demand for silver, that is bound to arise through the opening up 
of China, is bound to enhance the price of silver. Silver has 
seen its worst. The establishment of the gold standard in India 
has taught the European bankers a lesson which they will prob- 
ably not care to repeat in China. What the people in India did 
when they were on a silver basis they are now doing, since they 
are on a gold standard, making the gold disappear. We all 
know that enormous amounts of silver go to China and dis- 
appear every year. It is simply buried. Let the bankers estab- 
lish a gold standard in China, and instead of burying the silver 
they will bury the gold. It is, therefore, safe to predict a higher 
market for silver, which will naturally be of great benefit to 
Tonopah mines. 



The Combined Oil Company, operating on Sulphur 

Mountain, Ventura County, California, has had considerable 
trouble with the casing parting and other mishaps in their well 
No. 1 during the last two years. They just employed Mr. 
William Forstner, M. E., to make an examination of the prop- 
erty and try to find out, if possible, what was the cause of the 
long delay in getting in their well No. 1. He is at present look- 
ing over the property, and his report will be available to all the 
stockholders within the next ten days, at the company's office 
in the Phelan Building. 



Mr. E. F. Sagar, of the brokerage firm of Sagar-Loomis 

Company, has retired from business and purchased a country 
home at Napa, where he intends to lead the simple life. The 
firm will hereafter be known as W. G. Loomis, successor to 
Sagar-Loomis Company. 



Georgia Lawyer (to colored prisoner) — Well, Ras., so you 
want me to defend you. Have you any money ? Rastus- — No ; 
but I'se got a mule and a few chickens and a hog or two. Law- 
yer — Those will do very nicely. Now, let's see ; what do they 
accuse you of stealing? Rastus— Oh, a mule and a few chickens 
and a hog or two. — Life. 



Wedding Presents.— -The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



THE WEST COAST LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY 




348-354 Pine St.. cor. of 
Leick-sdorff Si. 

The leading life In- 
surance company whose 
principal place of busi- 
ness Is located In San 
Francisco. 

Sells the best policies 
In the market. 

Invites comparison 
with policies Issued by 
any other company. 

Writes both Ordinary 
and Industrial Business 
and in connection with 
regular policies writes 
both Accident and 
Health Insurance. 

Very desirable con- 
tracts with renewal 
commissions for com- 
petent, trustworthy 
men who know how to 
secure business. 

California Underwriting 
Association, General 
Agents for California. 
201 Sansome St., San 
Francisco. 



Home of the West 
Coast Life Insurance 

Company 



SULTAN TURKISH BATHS 

624 POST STREET. 

Special Department for Ladles. 

Open Day and Night for Ladles and Gentlemen. 

Al. Johnson, formerly of Sutter Street Hammam, has leased th« 

Sultan Turkish Baths, where he will be glad to see his old and n«w 

customers. 



r Rubber STAiiU. 

Stencils.Seals.Signs&Etc. 



560 MARKET ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Dr. Ajti«w, 

FrancUeo. 



rectal diseases exclusively. 424 Pacific Building, San 



Wells Fargo & Company 

IIP- ^^i^^^l Express 





MAW 



»C"H;» TO TMAntt 










mmmmm 




TRAVELERS' CHECKS 

Payable throughout the world at 
par without identification 



FAC-SIMILE OF WELLS FARGO & COMPANY TRAVELERS' CHECK 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 20, 1912. 



§©d&3 Hindi IP@ir§©na<aS Ktoaas 

CHESEBROUGH.— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Chesebrough are the guests of 

the latter's parents, Mr. and Mrs. "William Mayo Newhall, in Palo Alto. 
CUMMINGS. — Mrs. M. Earl Cummings. with her two children, will leave 

in a week or so for Santa Cruz, where she will be for a month or more. 
CLEMENT. — Mrs. E. B. Clement entertained informally in honor of the 

Dixwell Hewitts last week. 
DAVIS.— Mrs. Richard Davis, who has been passing the summer at Web- 
ber Lake, came to this city for a few days' shopping. She returned 

Tuesday, and will be away several weeks longer. 
DE LAVEAGA. — Mr. and Mrs. Vincent de Laveaga are established for 

the summer at their home near Los Gatos. 
DE CABRERA. — Madame Maria de Cabrera and Miss Gabrielle de 

Cabrera are visiting Mrs. Thomas Ryan at her home in Green street. 
FURLOUGH.— Mr. and Mrs. H. TT. Furlough and family are passing the 

summer at Carmel. 
FINNELL. — Mr. and Mrs. Bush Finnell are at Santa Cruz for a month's 

visit. 
GARCEAU. — Mrs. Alexander Garceau, accompanied by her two sisters, 

Mrs. Camillo Martin and Miss Mary Hyde, will leave soon for Europe. 
GHIRARDELLI.— Miss Corona Ghirardelli is at Fort Yellowstone, where 

she is a guest at the home ot Major Wright, U. S. A., and Mrs. "Wright. 
HOOKER. — Mrs. K. P. Hooker has returned from San Diego and taken 

possession of her new home in Pacific avenue. 
HOFFMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Hoffman and Mr. and Mrs. "Wallace 

"Wise are at Tahoe, having made the trip by motor some days ago. 

They will return to San Francisco in two weeks. 
HART. — Mrs. E. H. Hart is passing the summer at Ross Valley, and will 

be out of town for a few weeks longer. 
HARRISON. — Mrs. Chrystal Harrison has taken an apartment at 1770 

Pacific avenue for the summer. 
HENSHAW. — Mrs. William B. Henshaw, with Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chick- 

ering and Miss Florence Henshaw, will sail from England on Friday. 

They have been abroad for several months visiting with friends in the 

British Isles and in France. 
KENION. — Mrs. George Kenyon, wife of Lieutenant George Kenyon. 

U. S. N, is a visitor here from Mare Island, and is the guest of E. T. 

Allen at his home in Jackson street, 
MacADAM. — Miss Katherine MacAdam, who has been enjoying a visit at 

Castella, will return next week to her home in this city, 
McNEAR. — Mr. and Mrs. E. B. McNear will take possession of their new 

home.. "McNear Point," early next month. 
MORAGHAN. — Mrs. C. Moraghan is passing the summer with her mother, 

Mrs. Lipp. at Kentfield. 
McBEAN. — Mrs. Athole McBean and her son, Peter McBean, will come 

from Auburn the latter part of the month on a visit to Mrs. McBean's 

parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Mayo Newhall, in Palo Alto. 
MADISON. — Mrs. Frank Madison and her daughters, Miss Margaret and 

Miss Caroline Madison, are established at Santa Cruz for a month or 

six weeks. 
MARTIN. — Mrs. Camillo Martin will leave in the near future for an ex- 
tended European trip. She will join her sisters, Mrs. Alexander Gar- 
ceau and Miss Mary Hyde, in Paris, leaving them in England for 

a brief visit with friends In London. 
MIN'TURN. — Mrs. Thomas R. Minturn, who was formerly Miss Dorothy 

Everett, with her young daughter is visiting her parents, Mr. and 

Mrs. Everett, at their home in Pacific avenue. 
MANN. — Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Martin Mann and Miss Eleanor Mann 

are the guests of Mrs. Bowditch Morton at her summer home at 

Patterson. 
MEE. — Letters from Mrs. James Mee and Miss Margaret Mee tell of the 

delightful time they are having in the southern part of Italy. They 

have recently enjoyed a motor trip to all the cities of interest in Italy. 
PLATE. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Plate have left for Portland, where they 

will live. 
POPE. — Lieutenant-Commander and Mrs. Pope are located at the South- 

mayde. 
POTTER. — Mrs. Mayme McNutt Potter is the guest of her brother-in- 
law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. David Brown, at their home in Colorado. 
POWER. — Miss May Power, the attractive sister of Neal Power, who has 

been visiting here for several weeks, lias been entertained at innumer- 
able teas, luncheons and dinners since her arrival. 
SOMERS. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Somers are passing the season at Fair 

Oaks, and will be away several weeks. 
SCHWERIN.— Mrs. R. P. Schwerin and Miss Arabella Schwerin and Dick 

Schwerin are at Del Monte. 

Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Eugene Payne, dentists, have resumed 

practice at 146 Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 66. Hours: 9 to 4. 



SHORE. — Miss Ethel Shorb and her aunt, Miss Wilson, are at present In 

Stockholm. 
SCHELD. — Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Scheld are at Inverness. 
VAN STCKLEN. — Mr. and Mrs. Jack Van Sicklen have returned from 

their wedding journey. Mrs. Van Sicklen was formerly Misa Sue 

Harrold. 
"WHITNEY. — Parker Whitney has returned to his ranch at Rocklin, after 

a week's visit to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker Whitney, at 

Del Monte. 
WILLIS. — Mrs. William Willis has returned from a lengthy visit at Car- 
mel, and has taken apartments at Pacific avenue and Webster street. 
WEBSTER. — Mr, and Mrs. Hugh Webster are In Chlco, where they will 

remain for several weeks. 
WELLER. — Judge and Mrs. Charles Weller and their daughter, Mrs. Earl 

Shipp, are enjoying a visit of several days at Castle Crag. 
WOOD. — Mrs Baldwin Wood will be In Paris at the same time as her 

aunts, and together they will motor through the southern part of 

France and Italy. 



A GREAT WEEK FOR SANTA CRUZ. 

Automobilists in particular, and pleasure seekers in general, 
will gather at Santa Cruz to-day for the enjoyment of one of 
the greatest outdoor celebrations known to Santa Cruz. Mana- 
ger Swanton has given many weeks of attention to the arrange- 
ments for the festival week, commencing July 20th and ending 
July 28th. According to official bulletins from the throne room 
of King Pleasure, situated for the next four weeks in the big 
Casino facing the beach, Santa Cruz has been transformed into 
a veritable "City o' Dreams," in anticipation of the great crowd 
of merry-makers who will assemble there during "Water 
Week." 

No expense has been spared to make the Sea Breeze City 
attractive and insure the happiness of a monstrous throng. The 
hotels, the Casino, the multiplicity of attractions lining the 
mile-long board walk, have all been polished and put in order, 
while a hundred new sensations await the visitor who comes to 
Santa Cruz, whether it be for rest, recreation or a rollicking 
romp beside the sea. Even the usually indifferent fishermen 
on the long wharf near Lighthouse Point can be seen scouring 
up their launches and preparing for the jolly parties which will 
want to troll for finny monsters of the deep. 

The dining room at the Casa del Rey is now elaborately deco- 
rated, and all comforts known to hotel life will be in evidence 
in order to satisfy the large crowd that no doubt will be present. 
Provision has also been made for the care of automobiles and 
automobile parties, so that no anxiety may be felt by those for- 
tunate enough to make the delightful trip from the bay region 
in that manner. 

The railroads are offering especially low fares from all Cali- 
fornia points to Santa Cruz during pageant week. The hotels 
— amongst them the beautiful new Casa del Rey and the St. 
George — have announced that no "extras" will be charged, the 
regular rates being maintained throughout the festivities. 
Reservations for the Casa del Rey and the Cottage City may be 
made by telephone. 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Herrscher, with their son, Edward, and 
daughter, Emma, including Miss Lilly Hesser, will motor in 
their Packard touring car to Del Monte, Monterey and Santa 
Cruz shortly, also visiting the surrounding country. They will 
stop at the Casa del Rey during the water carnival at Santa 
Cruz. 



The celebrated Mountain Ash Welsh Choir, recently appear- 
ing at the Orpheum, are rehearsing Dr. H. J. Stewart's prize 
composition, "The Song of the Camp," and will shortly produce 
it. Mr. Glyndur Richards, the conductor, is enthusiastic in 
praise of the work. The first local performance of "The Song 
of the Camp" will be by the Loring Club in October. 



THROUGH RAILROAD TICKETS 

Issued (o All Parts of 

United States, Canada and Mexico 

Io Connection With These Magnificent Passenger Steamers 



Portland 

First Class $10. $12. $15 
Second Class $6 



Los Angeles 

First Class $8.35 
Second Class $5.35 




SAILINGS EVERY FIVE DAYS 



The San Francisco & Portland S. S. Co. 
A. OTTINGER, General Agent 

Ticket Offices, 722 Market, opp. Call, Tel. Sutter 2344 

8 East St, opp. Ferry Bldr, Tel. Sutter 2482. 
Berkeley Office: 2105 Shatruck, Tel. Berkeley 331. 



July 20. 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



FROM THE WHEEZY STEAM-PUFFER 

TO THE MODERN ELECTRIC CAR. 

There is no greater indicator of the success and development 
of San Francisco than the growth of its street car service; in 
fact, the city's expansion is dependent on this service, and like 
all growing bodies of the kind, it seeks the lines of assistance, 
which is along the car lines. Like all great and successful 
corporations, the United Railways Company recognizes that the 
growth and commercial prospects of San Francisco and its own 
are identical, and therefore its aim has ever been to establish 
the best street car system in the United States. Its marked 
rise among the municipal railway systems of the country dem- 
onstrates this success. 

Until the advent of the United Railways, with its unsur- 
passed transfer system to all parts of the city, its up-to-date 
pay-as-you-enter cars, its convenient "owl" service, its splendid 
"sight seeing" cars, and its quick and timely service, the city 
suffered under an archaic, go-as-you-please system, careless of 
public requirements and indifferent to public demands. A half- 
dozen car companies served the community, each working in- 
dependently in its own little field, and careless of the conven- 
ience and the privileges of its patrons to reach any destination 
outside its own territory. The change from this lax and con- 
fusing condition was Aladdin-like when the United Railways 
obtained control of the situation. 

Many San Franciscans remember the steam-dummy on the 
end of the Geary street line in the early '90's, and its com- 
panion, the old, dilapidated., wheezy steam-puffer that strained 
and grunted with a few cars of passengers from First avenue 
out to the Cliff House along the beautiful scenic route that 
skirts the Golden Gate. Compare the inconvenient accommo- 
dation and service of that day with the present one, under the 
management of the United Railways Company; compare the 
present service with the little balloon shaped horse cars that 
used to run to Woodwards' Gardens and along Larkin street, 
when it often required a crew of men armed with crow-bars to 
get the awkward, foolish looking cars reversed and in a posi- 
tion to make their return trip. A passenger that embarked on 
one of those "time killers" never had the remotest idea when, 
and in what condition, he would reach his destination. The 
horse car lines traversing the city and sandhill sections of 
that period were all managed by different companies; vtry 
few transfers were exchanged, and the public suffered under an 
extremely slow, slipshod, indifferent and expensive service. 

The far-seeing builders of the Central Pacific Railroad, 
Stanford, Crocker and Huntington, realized the future of the 
local street car traffic, and in the late 70's they began to pick 
up the stock of the leading street car lines centering on Market 
street. About that time an ingenious San Franciscan, in trying 
to solve a method of reaching and developing the extensive 
hill district of San Francisco as a place of residence, conceived 
the idea of a wire cable running in a slot, and his idea was 
tested with success on the old Clay street hill. That was the 
beginning of the cable car system in this country. Stanford, 
Crocker and Huntington took up the idea, and in a short time 
they had cables running on Market street. 

The next step in the transformation was the appearance of 
one of these wonderful modern commercial prestidigitators 
who grab up a number of little companies tired of the foolish 
battle of eternal competition in striving to eke out barely in- 
terest on their investments. This prestidigitator signed up the 
interests of the most important of these little companies and 
transformed them into a single holding, which Patrick Calhoun 
and other big Eastern capitalists purchased and named the 
United Railways. And in this way the scattered, disconnected, 
aimless little railways, sprawling carelessly over the peninsula 
of San Francisco, were transformed into a modern, compact, 
efficient organization, an up-building machine which has helped 
more than any other hand to develop to the highest capacity 
the physical home and business life of this community. 

The ordinary daily passenger who drops his nickel into the 
slot of a P. A. Y. E. car, takes his seat and leisurely unfolds 
his daily paper to read away the few minutes' time while the 
electric car carries him to his office with the speed and short 
direction of an auto, perhaps never stops to think that he is 
only one of over 65,000 other passengers that are transported 
expeditiously, comfortably and safely each day in over 600 
cars run by the company, the finest, most efficient and most 
painstaking piece of machinery of its kind in the West. 



$72.50 



To Chicago and Return 
on the Peerless 

Golden State Limited 



A Transcontinental Delight 



This rate good on many days in 
July, August and September. 

Similar low rates to many other 
Eastern points. 

Return limit October 31st, 1912. 

Telephone or write our agents. 



Rock Island 
Southern Pacific 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 20, 1912. 



Dick Whittington, in London, with his famous cat, seek- 
ing fame and the mayoralty, and Benjamin Franklin, trudging 
into Philadelphia with a few crusty loaves in his scant pack, 
seeking a chance to set type in a print shop, hit at last the cen- 
ter mark of fame and fortune. Though I. Zellerbach did not 
fare so well at the hands of Fame, he deserves a conspicuous 
niche among the successful notables of the Pacific Coast for 
the remarkable victories he achieved over every commercial 
obstacle that beset his path. Like the two worthies mentioned, 
he began life a poor man, but he possessed energy, ability, 
commercial acumen, a sense of "the square deal," and an in- 
domitable ambition to place his name among the leaders of 
Pacific Coast mercantile life. He had worked in a paper store 
and had thoroughly learned the kinds, grades, weights and 
qualities of the various papers. His first essay in business for 
himself was in a very small way, to solicit orders. By degrees 
he extended his field and the size of his orders, thereby gradu- 
ally increasing his stock and the volume of his business. As 
his trade widened in extent, he took his two sons, Isidore and 
Jacob, into jartnership, and placed part of the rapidly growing 
executive work upon their willing shoulders. To-day the 
wholesale paper house of Zellerbach Paper Company is one of 
the largest in the country. With branches in Los Angeles, Oak- 
land, Seattle, Portland and the big cities of the Pacific Coast, 
it practically controls the paper business of the West. Paper 
the size of a quire to a trainload passes through its hands with 
equal facility. So prodigious are the demands of its many 
branches that it handles the entire output of several paper mills. 
No small glory is it to have founded such an enormous modern 
commercial establishment, a giant in the paper world, and to 
have accomplished it from such a modest beginning, soliciting 
paper orders, as I. Zellerbach did. 



"Do you think the frequent political excitement is de- 
sirable?" asked the conservative citizen. "Undoubtedly. We 
need something occasionally to remind our baseball players 
that they are not the only great people on earth." — Washington 
Star. 



After the theatre there is no more convenient and attrac- 
tive place to sup comfortably at than Techau's Tavern, at Mar- 
ket and Powell streets, the heart of the fashionable hotel and 
theatre district. No better musical program is furnished in 
San Francisco, for the orchestra is unexcelled. Visitors to the 
city miss the best part of the evening's entertainment if they 
fail to round off their theatre outing with a supper at Techau's. 



A Treat in the Country. Especially if it is a box of Geo. 

Haas & Sons' delicious candies. Sent by mail or express from 
any of their four stores. 



Home-made Jams and Jellies. Delicious combinations of 

apricot-pineapple, apricot-cherry, currant-loganberry, etc. 931 
Eddy street. Phone Franklin 723. 



A. W. Beat 




Alice Betft 


BEST'S 


ART 


SCHOOL 


1625 California 

Life Cluaes 
Day and Night 


Street 

Illustrating 
Sketching 
Palntlnr 



MANZANITA HALL 

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA. 
Makes a specialty of preparing boys and young men for entrance 
to the universities. The location adjacent to Stanford University 
and to Palo Alto, a town of remarkable culture, makes possible a 
school life of unusual advantages and opportunities. 

Twentieth year opens Aug. 27, 1912. For catalogue and specific 
information, address 
W. A. SHEDD, Head Master. 



MISS HEAD'S SCHOOL, 
2538 Charming Way, Berkeley, Cal. 
Boarding and day school; college preparation; accredited to college; 
25th sear, August 20th, 1912. 

MARY B. WILSON. M. L., Principal. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



DOMINICAN 
COLLEGE 



SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIFORNIA 



A* A* <£* 



A Boarding School for Young Women, conducted by the Sisters 
of St. Dominic, situated In Magnolia Valley and protected by the 
lofty hills of the Tamalpals Range. Fifty minutes by boat and 
train from San Francisco. Climate unsurpassed for healthfulness. 
Ideal condition for scholastic work. 

Classical, Scientific and Commercial Courses. Specially organized 
departments of Music, Art and Domestic Economy. Well equipped 
Library and Laboratory. Accredited by the University of California. 



The Raymond Coaching School 

Twelfth Year 

Individual Instruction Only 

Preparation for University Entrance Examinations, 

for West Point, Annapolis and Professional 

Colleges. 

Ten departmental teachers of special training and 

extended experience. 

The chief purpose which the methods of the school 

seek to further: the development in the student 

of the greatest possible mental power. 



Telephone West 2761 



2659 California St 



San Francisco 



PRIVATE INSTRUCTION ONLY 

Shorthand — Typewriting — Bookkeeping 

Munson School of Shorthand 

820 to 827 Whitney Building 

133 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 3671 LUCILE SMITH, Principal 



Miss Harker's School 



PALO ALTO 

CALIFORNIA 



Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year begins August 15th. 
Catalogue upon application. 



HEALDS 

BUSINESS COLLEGE 

425 Mc Allister St.San Francisco. 



Each leads toa Lucrative Position 



July 20, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



©fit ftBa© G&n&fflll 



Section 11 of the Panama Canal Bill, now pending before 
Congress, brings the people of the Pacific Coast face to face 
with a problem of paramount importance to their interests. 
That section rigidly determines how vessels owned or con- 
trolled by railroad companies shall be allowed to pass through 
the Canal : a "rider," subsequently added to it, provides that 
"no such railroad owned or controlled ships shall pass 
through the Canal unless at least fifty per centum of its 
cargo, in tonnage, is destined to or shipped from Oriental or 
European ports." To the layman, superficially scanning the 
bill, this clause seems rational, fair and above board, but a 
careful scrutiny of its effects on railroad controlled vessels re- 
veals it to be packed as full of disastrous results as would ensue 
from boxes of dynamite mixed in the coal bunkers of the ves- 
sels. Briefly, that clause virtually bars from the Canal all ves- 
sels in which railroads are interested, by craftily handicapping 
them in handling coastwise cargoes. 

Under the restrictions imposed, railroad controlled vessels 
would find it impossible to compete with the heavily subsidized 
Oriental vessels. 

San Francisco is vitally interested in every word and phrase 
of the Canal Bill; on it her long awaited commercial supremacy 
of the West is based. Any word or clause therein that checks 
or conflicts with the natural and expanding growth of her ship- 
ping facilities handicaps her just that much in developing her 
extraordinarily promising ocean traffic. The clause mentioned 
strikes hardest at one of the city's oldest, strongest and most 
successful steamship lines, a line that is almost coeval with the 
history of the city, the line that has done by far the most to 
build up California's commerce by sea — the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company. If that "rider" becomes part of the organic law 
it will be absolutely impossible for the Pacific Mail S. S. Co. 
to maintain a service between New York and Hong Kong, via 
Honolulu and San Francisco and the Canal, as it has planned. 
Under that "rider" the company partially under railroad con- 
trol, cannot route a vessel from New York to Hong Kong, via 
the Canal, with any domestic or coastwise cargo aboard, unless 
for every ton of coastwise cargo she also carries a like quantity 
of foreign freight for foreign ports. To put it concretely, if, 
in the keen competition going on between the rival big steam- 
ship companies in New York, the Pacific Mail S. S. Co. should 
be unable to obtain more than 500 tons of Asiatic freight, the re- 
sult would be, under this "rider" clause, that its vessel would be 
allowed to carry only 500 tons of coastwise or domestic freight. 
This means that a vessel of, say, 10,000 tons capacity, would be 
compelled to sail from New York with 9,000 tons of empty 
space in her hold, in order to be sure of clearance through the 
Canal, under this preposterous "rider" clause. If, through any 
accidental slip, the captain accepted more than 500 tons of 
domestic freight, the Canal officials would bar his passage till 
the excess amount was discharged "at hand." A Pacific Mail 
liner bound from Hong Kong to New York, via San Francisco, 
would be treated in the same way; the tonnage of the Asiatic 
shipment would measure the exact maximum amount that the 
vessel could pick up at San Francisco and way domestic ports 
before attempting passage through the Canal. This absurd 
condition would prevail even though the liner had ample space 
for 9,000 tons of delayed domestic freight eager to reach New 
York, and the captain were willing to carry it. The rank injustice 
and the arrant folly of the proposed system would be more 
strikingly illustrated during the fall and winter months, when 
there is always a very heavy movement eastward of California 
products, a period when railroad controlled vessels coming from 
the Orient would be arbitrarily limited in the size of their 
coastwise cargoes and almost certain to be forced to carry 
empty space, without being able to fill that space with the 
freight crowding the docks and impatient for shipment. 

Indirectly this same useless, foolish paragraph bears heavily 
on passenger traffic. Before and during the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition there will be a heavy passenger movement from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific Coast, and a large proportion of these 
passengers will desire to go through the Canal in order to per- 
sonally view its engineering and scenic wonders. Under the 



present coastwise laws such traffic can be carried only on 
American vessels. If new legislation is enacted which will cur- 
tail the movements of American passenger vessels, or discour- 
building and maintaining them, this country will in a short 
time lose its present facilities for handling this immense pas- 
senger traffic that might readily be preserved at very high 
figures after the Panama-Pacific Exposition had passed out of 
existence. 

Over a year ago, and before any one had any conception of 
the framing of this reckless and destructive "rider," the Pacific 
Mail S. S. Co. carefully planned to build four new huge up-to- 
date combination and freight liners, using fuel oil, to ply be- 
tween Asiatic ports and New York, via Honolulu, San Francisco 
and the Canal. Plans were also perfected to improve the "Mon- 
golia," "Manchuria," "Korea" and "Siberia," now plying be- 
tween this port and the Orient, and put them on the long run 
with the other four at intervals of two weeks' sailing dates. 
Under such circumstances, San Francisco would occupy an en- 
viable position on the commercial map of "the half around the 
world run," as the home port of this big fleet. All this might 
have been if that absurd "rider" had not loomed up bigger than 
the iceberg which destroyed the Titanic. 

It required unusual courage on the part of the Pacific Mail 
S. S. Co. to plan this great fleet of ocean leviathans and meet 
the enormous expense entailed, but the company, during its 
sixty years of life, has taken a pride in always providing the 
port of San Francisco with the best and most adequate steam- 
ship service to be had ; it has made the city's interests its own 
interests, and has become one of the institutions of the city. 
For these reasons the company spent a huge sum of money sev- 
eral years ago in recapturing the Oriental passenger traffic for 
San Francisco from the steamers of the wealthy Canadian 
Pacific. The Pacific Mail alone has the credit of making San 
Francisco the chief port of the Pacific Coast in handling trans- 
Pacific business; some 40,000 passengers pass over its deck 
planks yearly, and these visitors contribute a handsome total to 
the hotels, theatres and stores of the city. But large as was the 
sum the company spent on its fleet to wrest the control of the 
Oriental passenger control from the Canadian Pacific, it was 
prepared to expend a far larger amount on its new fleet for the 
Oriental New York run. Bids on each of the four vessels were 
$3,000,000, making a total of $12,000,000. This original cost 
and the subsequent cost of operating American vessels is very 
much in excess of similar costs on a foreign built vessel. 
American ships are further handicapped by the fact that prac- 
tically all foreign vessels operating under a service are in re- 
ceipt of heavy subsidies from their respective governments. In 
order to remain in this trying competition, to defend the com- 
mercial interests of the United States, American ships should 
therefore be given every possible encouragement and the privi- 
lege of selling every foot of cargo space on board in order to 
obtain every available penny therefrom, and enable the com- 
pany to operate successfully against the fierce competition of 
foreign vessels. 

The absence of the American flag on the high seas and the 
scarcity of American vessels on the ocean routes of commerce 
have iong been a by-word the world around. This absurd 
"rider" tacked to the Canal Bill is apparently intended by those 
most interested to lay the ghost of the American shipping trade. 
It is evident to all those who know the inside facts of the case 
that big interests are playing a deep game to capture the com- 
mercial supremacy of the Canal, and are determined at all haz- 
ards to control the character of ships going through that water- 
way. Such absolutism involves the future commercial interests 
of California, and Californians should take a strong and reso- 
lute position in joining the movement to defeat them on their 
absurd and dangerous "rider" in Congress. No matter on which 
side of the corporation line a San Franciscan stands, he will not 
be big enough to represent his share of the new commercial 
city unless he looks facts squarely in the face and adopts the 
square deal. He must be big enough and broad enough to 
bridle his personal prejudices and dispassionately consider the 
question which threatens to cut short the life of a company that 
inaugurated and built up by laborious efforts the marvelous 
volume of coastwise and Oriental trade possessed by this port; 
and all without the help of a single dollar from Uncle Sam, and 
in the face of the fiercest s<.a-far,ng competition on earth, com- 
petition with the sleepless, aggiessive and government-subsi- 
dized Asiatic steamship companies. 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 20, 1912. 



Royal! 

i Insurance; 



AUTOMOBILE 
INSURANCE 



Royal 

^Indemnity/ 
XComrany/ 



Royal Policies 

INSURE AGAINST 
Loss by 
FIRE 

THEFT 

-RANSPORTATION 
COLLISION 
LIABILITY 

FOR PERSONAL INJURIES 

AND PROPERTY DAMAGE 
PERSONAL ACCIDENT 



Royal Accident Policies Especially Favorable to 
Automobile Owners. 



Ask your agent or broker for a "ROYAL" policy or com- 
municate direct with us. 

ROYAL ROYAL 

INSURANCE INDEMNITY 

COMPANY, LTD. COMPANY 

Royal Insurance Building, 

N. W. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

ROLLA V. WATT, Manager. 



The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 



Home C 6705 



J. B. Pon J. Bergez 



C. Mailbebuau 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 
41S-421 Bush St.. Sao Francisco (Above Kearoy) Exchange, Douglas 2411 



Best SI Dinner in America at 

JULES Under MONADNOCK BUILDING 

Special 50c Luncheon Served In Ladies' Grill 
as well as Main Dining Hall 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



THE 1913 LOCOMOBILE. 

The announcement of the 1913 Locomobile contains much of 
interest to the ever-growing number of motoring enthusiasts. 

An examination of the 1913 models shows that not only do 
they retain all the Locomobile fundamentals, with certain re- 
finements, which have made the Locomobile a synonym for 
safety, reliability and durability, but also that greater attention 
than ever before has been given to those features tending to- 
ward greater luxury, comfort and convenience. 

Three models will be built for 1913, the Six "48," developing 
82 h. p.; the "38" Little Six, with 60 h. p.; and the Four-Cylin- 
der "30." These will be furnished in Touring, Torpedo, Limou- 
sine, Landaulet and Roadster bodies. All have been re-designed, 
but as the changes made on the "38" follow closely those made 
on the "48," a brief description of the latter only, is given here. 

The attention of the observer is naturally first attracted to 
the newly designed straight line, flush side bodies, which are 
very beautiful in appearance. All bodies, including the closed 
types, are fitted with an aluminum cowl dash. The emergency 
brake and gear shift levers have been placed inside, leaving 
the lines of the body unbroken. The equipment of the 1913 
Locomobile is most complete. 

An examination of the mechanical features of the 1913 "48" 
Big Six Locomobile will show a few changes, notably an in- 
creased stroke in the motor, the bore of which is 4% inches 
and the stroke 5^2 inches. 



SECRET OF GROWTH. 



The secret of the phenomenal growth of the business of the 
Pennsylvania Rubber Company, manufacturers of the cele- 
brated Vacuum Cup Tires, since its reorganization in February, 
1910, is difficult of solution only, until the investigators' atten- 
tion is called to the close relationship that exists in this model 
factory between the management and its highly efficient force 
of employees. This loyal co-operation and interest on the part 
of the working force of the company has been fostered and 
generated through the deep personal interest the management 
displays in the welfare of its employees. 

A large factory organization brought to its highest efficiency 
through the efforts of a management interested in the social 
and material welfare of its productive division, and reflected 
to every corner of the country through its high grade branch or- 
ganizations, makes a working unit impossible to hold back, and 
here, indeed, lies the entire explanation of the fact that in only 
thirty months' time Pennsylvania Vacuum Cup Tires have 
forged to the front as no other tire has ever done in so short a 
period, and they have earned and justified, by their extraor- 
dinary service, the great favor they have gained from the 
motoring public. 



Guide (in Venice) — This is St. Mark's. American Tour- 
ist (smiling) — Ah! The patron saint of the tourist, I presume? 
—Puck. 



( Sutter 1S72 

] Home C 3970 

( Home C 478 1 . Hotel 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rittman 
C. Lahederne 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTOIMI) 
RESTAURANT AND HOTEL NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner in the City with Wine. Si.oo. Banquet Halls and Private 

Dining Rooms. Music Every Evening. 
362 Geary Street San Francisco 



37-45 First Street, San Francisco. Phones: Sutter 2230; J 3221 

Private Exchange Connecting all Departments. 



Murphy Grant & Company 

"Wholesale Dry Goods Furnishing Goods 

Notions "White Goods Laces 

N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 

n i Back to our old location, 623 Sacramento Street, between 

JjiUoIlCd Kearny and Montgomery streets. 

"With full line of Brushes, Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 
to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets. Chamois, 
Metal Polish, and Cteanlng Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware. 
Call, write or telephone Kearny 5787. 

WM. BUCHANAN. 



July 20, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



27 







LocoTnoiile 
Six "48" 
veLSPins &z MR. 



o&como&ile 



T' 






*HE Locomobile Company, having long since attained a 
material lead in fundamentals, has been able to devote 
unlimited attention to new details and new features. As a 
result, the 1913 models offer more luxury and more comfort 
than can be found elsewhere. 

For 1913 the Locomobile will be built in three sizes: the long stroke Six 
"48," developing 82 horse-power; the Little Six, developing over 60 horse- 
power, and the "30" four cylinder, developing 41 horse-power. 

The Six "48" will be equipped with touring, torpedo, roadster, limou- 
sine and landaulet bodies. ....... $5,000 to $6,100. 

The Little Six will include all the above with the addition of berlines. $4,300 to $5,550. 

The "30" four cylinder will be in touring, torpedo and roadster models. $3,600. 



In addition to new body designs which express 
unique ideas as well as the latest features of American 
and European practice, these cars include every fea- 
ture contributive to the comfort and convenience of 
the passengers or the driver. 

The long, sweeping straight line bodies are united 
to the bonnet by a well-shaped curved dash. The 
body surfaces are unmarred and unbroken by hinges 



or handles. Long wheel base, perfect spring suspen- 
sion, absolute balance and ten-inch upholstery assure 
the maximum of comfort. 

Ventilated glass fronts, integral with the curved 
dash, dynamos supplying all lights, air compressors for 
inflating the tires, Disco Starter for starting the motor, 
all are contributory factors for convenience. The equip- 
ment includes quick detachable, demountable rims. 



THE LOCOMOBILE COMPANY OF AMERICA 



San Francisco — Van Ness ave. and Hayes st. 




Oakland — Twelfth and Harrison sis. 



28 

r 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 20, 1912. 



1913 R-C-H Has Arrived 




R-C-H "Twenty-Five" 

We are determined to build the best all-'round five-passenger 
touring car in the world and sell it, completely equipped, for 

$900 

f. o. b. DETROIT 

Please Study This Car and Equipment— Then Compare 
it With Any Other Car in the World Under SI 500 



Wheelbase— 11 

Motor — Long stroke; 4 cylinders cast en bloc; 3% -inch bure. 5- 
inch stroke. Two-hearing crank shaft. Timing gears and valves 
enclosed. Three-point suspension. 

Drive — Left Side. Iireversible worm gear, 16-in steering wheel. 
Spark and throttle control on steering column. Foot accelerator In 
connection with hand throttle. 

Control— Center U vted through H-plate integral with 

universal joint housing just below. Hand-lever emergency brake at 
driver's right. Clutch pedal operated by left foot. Service brake 
operated by right fool. Foot accelerator in connection with hand 
throttle. 

Springs — Front, semi-elliptic; rear, full elliptic and mounted on 
swivel seats. 

Frame — Pressed steel ehannel. 

Axles— Front. I-beam, drop-forged from one piece of steel; rear, 
semi-floating type. 

Transmission — 3 speeds forward and reverse; sliding gear, selec- 
tive type. 

Construction — All shafts and gears In transmission and rear axle 
made of chrome nickel steel. High carbon manganese steel used 



in all parts when special rigidity Is required. I >rop forgings used 
instead of castings. 

Body—Full 5-passenger English type; extra wide seats; lu-inch 
seat cushions specially upholsi' red 

Wheels— Artillery type. 

Xoii- skid all around '■'■- 

1 2-inch Bullet electric headlight with double parabolic lens. 

6-im . h Bullet el© lights with parabolic lens. Electric 

tail light 

Bosch Magneto. 

Warner Auto-Meter. 

Demountable rims. 

Extra rim and holders. 

TaUy-ho horn. 

Jiffy curtains — up or down instantaneously. 

Top and Slip Cover. 

Windshield, 

Rear view mirror. 

Tool-kit, Jack, Tire Repali Kit. rump. 

Robe Rail. 

>ra can tnapecl new models and territory will be allotted be- 
ginning Tuesday. July 16th. 



R-C-H Company, San Francisco Branch 
R-C-H CORPORATION, Detroit, Mich. 



Factory, Detroit, Mich. 



819-835 Ellis Street, Telephone Franklin 8050 






July 20, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



29 




By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

(NOTICE. — The Motoring Magazine Section is supplied in 
place of the Automobile Department this week. Every copy 
of the issue dated July 20th should contain a copy of the Motor- 
ing Magazine Section. — Editor.) 

* * * 

New licenses were issued to the following purchasers of au- 
tomobiles in San Francisco and vicinity for the week ending 
July 13th. The total number of licenses issued for the State 
for the same period was 363. 

ME1NINGER. DR. L. L„ 240 Stockton St.. S. P Pope-Hartford 

ALCO TAXICAB CO., 360 Golden Gate Ave., S. F Pope-Hartford (3) 

ISAACS. W. B., 1136 Flood Bldg.. S. F Cadillac 

GORHAM-REVERE RUBBER CO., 50 Fremont St.. S. F Rambler 

HUGHES. JAS. J.. 591 Haight St., S. F Overland 

HERON, E. A., 130 Moss Ave.. Oakland Cadillac 

BATTEN, W. R, 1911 Ashby Ave.. Berkeley Buick 

COOPER. MRS. C. B., 1804 University Ave.. Berkeley E-M-F 

SMITH. E. N.. Burhngame E-M-F 

IIULSE-BRADFORD CO., 986 Mission St., S. F Oakland 

JOHNSON, J. G., 333 Kearny St.. S. F Haynes 

SK1.IG. BEN. 333 Kearny St., S. F Haynes 

McDONALD & COLLETT, 741 Market St.. S. F Buick 

ALEX McDONALD, 2184 Mission St.. S. F Mitchell 

GRAY, WALTER. 60 Elgin Park, S. F Ford 

BURNHAM, C. W., 2947 Magnolia St., Berkeley Hupp 

REED, GEO. W.. 2334 Le Conte Ave.. Berkeley Cadillac 

PAUL. MRS. KATHERINE, 2412 Piedmont Ave.. Berkeley Peerless 

NEW ALMADEN TRANS. CO., 803 1st Nat. Bk„ San Jose Garford 

DIETZ, MRS. H., 020 Orchard St.. San Jose Mitchell 

SNITJER, D., 60 Stockton St., San Jose Ford 

McLURE. MISS ADA, 2500 Woolsey St., Berkeley ..: Ford 

HAYS. JNO. COFFIN, Fairmont Hotel. S. F Flanders 

t'lVILETI, P.. Columbus Ave., S. F Buick 

TOPHAM, DR. E.. 1500 Clay St., S. F Mitchell 

TRACEY, IT.. 428 Belvedere St., S. F Flanders 

HUEBSCH, F. J., 1374 Seventh Ave.. S. F Cartercar 

HAMILTON. R. G., 7555 Geary St., S. F Elmore 

PIERCE, T. J., 164 Castro St., S. F Warren 

WENDLING. MRS. G. X., 1200 Van Ness Ave.. S. F Peerless 

STEERS. HARRY, 3071 Harrison St.. S. F Jackson 

8EITMULLER, H. D., 76 First St.. S. F Oakland 

CLARK, MRS. LA VINA, 424 37th St.. Oakland Overland 

LKNHARDT, HATTIE, 1309 Broadway, Oakland White 

CITY OF OAKLAND-STREET DEPT., Oakland Ford (3) 

ARCHER, B. J.. 1078 55th St.. Oakland Overland 

MORRIS. C. W.. 2411 S. Atherton St., Berkeley Flanders 

PETERSON, JULIA, San. Bruno Overland 

WESTERN EQUIPMENT CO.. 72 Fremont St.. S. F Oakland 

McARTHUR. MRS. IDA, 350 Brown Ave.. San .lose E-M-F 

KENYON, J. W., 1(74 Sacramento St.. S. F E-M-F 

DOWDS. ARCHIE, 657 Castro St.. S. F Chalmers 

SCHILLING. GEO. A.. 211 Main St.. S. F , E-M-F 

COLEMAN, F. E., 360 Golden Gate Ave.. S. F Oakland 

NEWS LETTER. 21 Sutter St.. S. F Overland 

GREAT WESTERN POWER CO.. 233 Post St., S. F Autocar 121 

CUTTER. GEO. W.. 0311 Mer. Ex. Bldg., S. F Oakland 

BARTLEY, A. P.. 2332 E. 14th St.. Oakland llorris 

CASTRO, R. R. 3627 Market St.. Oakland Oakland 

PINCH, w. n.. 596 Eldorado St.. Oakland . . . .' Reo 

GILPIN. LEE IV. 2926 Webster St.. Oakland Hupp 

JOHNSON, ii. M., 2121 Shattucfc Ave. Berkeley Regal 

MILLER. A. (.'.. 2122 Rtdge Road, Berkeley Stevens-Dui 

Yl 1ST. N. P.. P. O. Box 666, Mill Valley Kline Kar 

BUCKLEY, MRS. ANNIE. Livermore Stevens-I lurvea 

WEEKS, w. 11., 664 University Av. Palo Alto Continental 

iiAKOR.vvio * DEPAOLI, S24 Turk St.. S. F Stevens-Duryea 

HcPARTLAND, P. D.. 1404 Leavenworth St.. S. V lla> 

KOEEBER, G. A.. 266 W. Santa Clara St.. San JD&B Reo 

NORRIS, JACK, 917 Kearny St. S. F Stevens-Durv.a 

l'AC. LAUNDRY MACHINE CO.. 761 Folsom St.. S. F. . . Stevens-Duryea 

SAMUEL. MAX., 217 Bush St.. S. F Boick 

LEWIS-SIM AS-.lnNES CO., 429 Davis St.. S. F Oakland 

Lapachet. aiks. i ,. B„ 122 Downey St.. S. F p , 

DUNN, CHAS., 2011 Polk St.. S. F Auto 

HALFORD, El. .1. Hotel argonaut, s. F Ford 

GfrOBO, GABRIEL, 164G Leavenworth St.. s. F nidsmobile 

SHERMAN. C. H.. 1932 Fell St.. S. F Elmore 

HANCOCK, .1 1' . 263 Bush St., S. F Flanders 

GOODYEAR RURBER CO.. 361 Golden Gat,- Ave. S. F Oakland 

JON TOZA , F.. sr.fio Vlncente St.. Oakland Overland 

DINGWELL, .1. F., 2021 West St.. Oakland Overland 

HOFFMAN, C. I.. Oakland Bk. of Savings, Oakland National 

QRAVTOTTO, .1. 1937 Delaware si. Berkeley Mack 

I'ERSELL. MRS. B.. Santa Barbara Road. Berkeley Hudson 

BARAI'AT. A.. San Bruno Cartercar 

CLEACO. J. R.. 115 N. First St.. San Jose Uco 

CAMPBELL. J. I... 1826 Young St, Selma Maxwell 

GODDARD, E. N.. 169 Santa Rosa Ave.. Oakland Interstate 

THOMPSON, J. ],.. Santa Clara Chalmers 

DEMENT, W. H.. 'Pole Ave. and Bancroft Way. Berkeley Reo 

ii u;IMiv, RICKARD S McCONE, 139 Towns i mers 

BLACKETT, A. );. 626 Capital St, VaUejo Ford 

MOLERA, A. .1.. 2025 Sacramento St.. s. F winton 

EtARSHBARGER, O. It.. 1082 Balboa Bldg., s. F " " Ford 

MARDIS, I'll, l: A . s. F Franklin 

HEYNEMAN, WALTER, L200 Van Ness Av . s. F. "peerless 

PAUL. OLXVIOR. 130S Stockton St.. S. F "Franklin 

GREAT WESTERN POWER CO.. S. F '.'. Chalmers 

BACEY, LOUIS, 720 Powell St.. S. F Chalmers 



I. INSTAL1 

MILLER ,v LUX, Abe 

1 ENL1 UNI . klnnd ..;.■".■ i 

l. VRSEN, JAS., 1600 23d Av 
EVT, JESI >. M.. 1788 alamei .... 

n. I'-. 66 9 Second St, San Jose ....'.'.'.".'.' 
Idan Road, San J 

CITS O] JOSE, San Jose E \r F 

ROSSI! •' ■ i 

ROSENTHAL, M.. 1880 Page St., S. t 




1310 BASIN 
REDWOOD F%RI 



5ANTA CRUZ 



Another fatal accident happened last Sunday near Lexington 
in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 

This particular piece of road has now cost three lives, and it 
is hoped that something will be done at this particular spot to 
protect the lives of those who travel over it. 

The trouble is, that in building the road the builders cut only 
half the width of the road into the mountain, taking the dirt 
and rock out of the cut and dumping it on brush; they have 
tried by this means to build the other half. 

This system may have been successful in the days before 
the motor car, but now that age has passed. Roads hereafter 
must be cut the full width into the mountain if life and property 
are to be protected. 

When roads are known to be unsafe for motor car travel, such 

as the Lexington road, the county officials should post the 

road as such. 

» « » 

The roads around San Francisco Bay are getting in a deplor- 
able condition. The heavy traffic has worn off the top dressing, 
and the hard top surface is exposed. 

It will not be long, under the present conditions, before the 
latter will commence to loosen up, and when that stage is 
reached, it will take thousands of dollars to repair the damage, 
instead of hundreds that it would cost now to save the roads. 

The trouble all lies in the fact that those who are responsible 
for the roads fail to understand the one vital question in road 
building: that after a road is once completed, the only way to 
make it last is to constantly watch it, and when it shows signs 
of travel to at once repair it. 

The money spent yearly on the roads in California, instead 
of all being spent at once in spring, should be so handled that 
there is enough withheld to pay some one to be always repair- 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 20, 1912. 



forget that dear (expensive) town of Mayfield. Was there ever 
a community that had such little civic pride. 

The main street is a prize winner, it is so bad. Springs, tires 
and the car in general suffer when going through this place. 

It is said that the reason why the county does not fix up this 
road is that it is in the limits of an incorporated town, and that 
the town of Mayfield is unable to raise money to fix up the road. 
If such is the case, Mayfield should "acknowledge the corn" 

and disincorporate. 

• * » 

Another fatal accident happened last Sunday near Lexington 
in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 

This particular piece of road has now cost three lives, and it 
is hoped that something will be done at this particular spot to 
protect the lives of those who travel over it. 

The trouble is, that in building the road the builders cut only 
half the width of the road into the mountain, taking the dirt 
and rock out cf the cut and dumping it on brush; they have 
tried by this means to build the other half. 

This system may have been successful in the days before 
the motor car, but now that age has passed. Roads 'hereafter 
must be cut the full width into the mountain if life and property 
are to be protected. 

When roads are known to be unsafe for motor car travel, such 
as the Lexington road, the county officials should post the 

road as such. 

* * * 

In speaking of the automobile, Max Rosenfeld, one of the 
oldest motor car enthusiasts, says: "The public does not really 
realize what a wonderful thing the auto is. They generally 
think that it 'just grew.' That some one planted a lot of raw 
material in a shop, and then came around a few months later 
and found a most beautiful automobile blossoming forth. 

"This is a really most interesting way of looking at it, but 
such is not the case, as every one knows. 

"It was only by the hardest kind of well directed work that 
the car of to-day has been produced. 

"This has been the history of the Velie car, and that brains 
had been used in building it is shown by the way the Velie 
car is becoming one of the most popular in the market. 



"It is one of the best hill climbers made ; is lighter than most 
of its competitors; is absolutely quiet; has the smoothest acting 
clutch on the market, and in every way will bear comparison 

with any other car made." 

* * * 

"Women dictate not only auto apparel styles, but the auto's 
design as well," says Henry D. McCoy, head of Chanslor & 
Lyons motor supply company. 

"Feminine appreciation is a power in the motor car industry 
not generally realized by the public. Women's part in the de- 
sign of the car is a dominant one. While they are not so much 
interested in mechanical details, the knowledge of their many 
preferences in the matter of comfort, appointment and style 
sternly dictate what shall or shall not be done. 

"While these are essentials in construction, the same dicta- 
tion is being felt in the apparel for the motor man and motor 
woman. Heretofore practically any old thing in the way of 
clothing has been accepted. But there is now a strong move- 
ment toward correctness of dress while motoring. This is most 
forcibly seen in the latest circular and reports from the East. 
Our company has received these late reports and realizes that 
it is but a few months before every owner or user of a motor car 
will be as particular in his dress as he is for business or the 
social life that follows business hours. We have ordered out 
the advance guard of these styles in our motor coats, which we 

now have on display." 

• * • 

E. L. Cutting, traveling sales representative for the Standard 
Motor Car Company, has just returned from an extended trip 
throughout the Northwest, during which he covered more than 
7,000 miles and "made" the States of Idaho, Montana and 
Utah. 

"But few people, comparatively, realize the vast scope and 
range of territory controlled by the Standard Motor Car Com- 
pany," said Cutting, "or the great number of cars distributed 
through this area by it. The bountiful crops being harvested 
this season, and the prosperous condition of the population, 
have enabled them to gratify their desire for a car that com- 
bines all the good qualities necessary to make it render the 
maximum of service, and this accounts, in a large measure, for 



The 




C 



ar 



and Absolute Motor Satisfaction Are Synonymous 




4-CYLINDER AND 6-CYLINDER 

"PASSES THEM ALL" 

On the road In flexibility Up the hill In silence 

In power In equipment In speed In finish 

AND 

THE PRICE IS RIGHT 

Send for Pleasure or Commercial Catalogs Ask for a Demonstration 

RELIANCE AUTOMOBILE CO. 

342-352 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 



July 20, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



31 





The only POSITIVE NON-SKID 
devica ever perfected in an 
automobile tire. 



Never a Nervous Moment on Wet or Greasy Pavements 

Never a moment to attach chains because of sudden rain 
Greatest all around mileage capacity ever built into tires 

Pennsylvania 

VACUUM CUP 
TIRES 



NON-SKID GUARANTEE. 

Buy a set of Vacuum Cup Tiros 
and if, after reasonable trial, they 
do not fulfill every claim we make 
as to their anti-skid qualities, re- 
turn them and receive back Che 
full price you paid. 



MILEAGE GUARANTEE. 

While our guarantee of 4.000 ac- 
tual miles is exceptional, our ex- 
perience has proved this guarantee 
to be far more conservative than 
even the lesser guarantees on ordi- 
nary tires. 



The VACUUM CUP TREAD, because it is the deepest and heaviest, 
and because it does not "heat up" and lose its life, is the longest 
wearing tread yet designed for Dry Weather. 

Do your Touring and Mountain Driving equipped with VACUUM CUP 
TIRES and realize fully the great satisfaction and perfect con- 
fidence you will experience through a personal demonstration 
of the justification of the exceptional guarantees these wonderful 
tires carry. 

PENNSYLVANIA RUBBER COMPANY 



OF CALIFORNIA 



San Francisco — 512-14 Mission St. 



Los Angeles — 930 S. Main St 



DISTRIBUTORS : 



MART1.ANO COMPANY. Cor. r.ith and I Oakland. 

A. J. winters company. 61 Sri Bt, Portland 
HUMICK AFFLBTON CO., Sacramento, Cal. 
KTJTNBR GOLDSTEIN CO., Fresno. Selma. Hanforri. I 
K. A. FEATHERSTOXF. CO., I .os Angeles. Cal. 
JACKSON ENO COMPANY, l.os Angeles. 
GRABLE & YOUNG, San Diego. 



PACIFIC H'D'WE & STEEL CO.. San Francisco. Portland and 

Los Angeles. 
BAKER ft HAMILTON, San Francisco. Sacramento and Los 

Angeles. 
MARSHALL WELLS H'D'WE CO., Portland. Ore., and Spokane, 

Washington. 




32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 20, 1912. 



the predominance of sales of cars equipped with the Knight 
Silent motor. That this wonderful type is the coming engine 
I am thoroughly convinced, and our sales of cars equipped 
with this power plant are producing enthusiastic testimonials 
from our purchasers. I have called upon our agent at Salt Lake 
City and found him doing a regular 'land office' business and 
reporting many orders being booked for Stoddard-Daytons, 
which are equipped with the Knight Silent motor. 

"The Elks' convention in Portland was being held when I 
reached that city, and there were so many and strenuous 
'Brother Bills' from San Francisco that the town had no oppor- 
tunity to forget them. General business conditions throughout 
my territory reflect the prospective prosperity that seems cer- 
tain is about to visit the entire country, and every indication 
points to an unprecedentedly prosperous year in 1913." 

* * * 

The Halliwell Company has now the agency for the Stewart 
gas saver. The Stewart gas saver is an auxiliary air device; it 
is the biggest little thing ever attached to an automobile. While 
the Stewart gas saver is primarily a gasoline economizer and 
mixer, it is also a perfect auxiliary air valve for increasing the 
power and speed of the engine. This feature alone makes it in- 
dispensable for racing cars, and wherever maximum speed and 
power are essential. It enables you instantly to determine the 
proper adjustment of the carbureter at any speed and under all 
road conditions. It will save up to forty per cent in gasoline. 
It gives a possible gain of from fifteen to twenty per cent in 
speed. It permits the use of heavier gasoline. With it, the 
correct adjustment of the carburetor for any speed can be de- 
termined, on the road, from the driver's seat. The mixture can 
be made temporarily rich on stopping, as a means for starting 
on the spark — a great help. 

* * # 

J. I. Handley, president of the American Motors Company 
and the reorganized Marion Motors Company, on Tuesday was 
host at a luncheon at a "local cafe to the representatives of the 
two factories in this section, and to the automobile editors of 
the local dailies. Handley has been in San Francisco for the 
past week, and, while rumors regarding the reason for his visit 
were many, the real objects remained a secret until the luncheon 
on Tuesday, when he announced that the management of the 
American Motors California company, of which he is also 
president, and which is a direct factory branch of the Indian- 
apolis company, was changed, and that he had perfected an 
arrangement for a direct factory branch for the Marion Com- 
pany in San Francisco. 

Handley stated that the change in the management of the 
American Motors California company was brought about by the 
fact that W. Scott Heywood, who was treasurer and general 
manager of the corporation, became so busily engaged in other 
commercial enterprises that he decided to retire, and it was 
with much regret that his resignation was accepted by the 
officers of the company. The vacancy occasioned by the with- 
drawal of Heywood has been filled by the appointment of his 
former assistant, F. M. Bowman, who is thoroughly familiar 
with the automobile industry, and who for the last two years 
has been one of the most popular men in the local motoring 
fraternity. Marc Bunnell, Western district manager for the 
American Motors Company, retains his post as vice-president 
of the local selling organization. 

Relative to the establishment of the Marion factory branch in 
San Francisco, Handley announced that Howard W. Harring- 
ton, who has been the Coast factory representative for the old 
Marion Company, would be retained by the new organization 
as manager of the branch, and that N. B. Charles, who had the 
local agency, would act as Harrington's assistant. Temporary 
quarters for the branch have been secured at 346 Golden Gate 
avenue, and complete service and parts departments will be 
installed. San Francisco will in future be the central distribut- 
ing point for the Marion business on the Coast. 

Mr. Handley has faith in the Pacific Coast from the manu- 
facturers' standpoint, and predicts a great future for the trade 

during the year 1913. 

* * * 

According to Colonel A. W. Bradbury, president of the 
Pacific Motor Car Company, distributors of the Cole car in 
this vicinity, he has just received the advice from the Cole 
Motor Car Company at Indianapolis, Indiana, that they have 
been given an encore on their year's output, and right at the end 



of the season the demand on them for their product was so 
great that they have been compelled to increase their output by 
several hundred cars. 

* » * 

The first reliability contest in Maine, consisting of a run of 
444 miles through the Pine Tree State and the White Mountains 
of New Hampshire, brought out an entry list which has encour- 
aged Maine motorists to take a more active part in automobile 
contests. Every feature was successful, and although several 
cars were heavily penalized, all finished the run. 

H. W. Blanchard, of Portland, who laid out the route of the 
contest, made a perfect score with his Stoddard-Dayton car. 
The whole caravan was held up at Newport, Me., on the last 
day for speeding. 

* * * 

The Standard Motor Car Company has just delivered a Fed- 
eral one-ton truck to the Monotti-Larimer Company, distribu- 
tors of dairy products, which they propose using in place of 
four teams, covering the same ground in less time than the 
quartet of horse-drawn vehicles, and at considerably less ex- 
pense. That this could be accomplished was satisfactorily 
proven to them after a brief demonstration. The finish of the 
body is rather novel, in that an imitation of oak has been ac- 
complished through a new graining process. The running gear 
is a cardinal red, the hood black, and the balance of the car 
grained oak. An attractive sign completes the job. 

* * * 

Mr. P. T. Evans, a capitalist from Pasadena, with a party of 
friends, drove from his home there in his Stevens-Duryea 
touring car to San Francisco, called upon the Pacific Motor Car 
Company, and will continue on as far north as Portland. 

* * * 

Colonel A. W. Bradbury, of the Pacific Motor Car Company, 
with a party of friends has just returned from an interesting trip 
to the Yosemite, driving there in his six-cylinder Stevens- 
Duryea. 



REPUBLIC 

StAgGaRd TREAD 




July 20, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



33 




34 



and California Advertiser 



July 20, 1912. 



We, ym^of-Jam^i^im 



England's protest against the 
John Bull Butts In. American policy of granting im- 
munity from Panama Canal tolls to 
American-owned ships doing coastwise business, is in the most 
courteous diplomatic language, but it implies a good deal more 
than a protest. England regards the free canal bill now pend- 
ing in the United States Congress as rank discrimination against 
the commerce of all other nations, and will not stand for it. On 
the other hand, Congress and President Taft are equally deter- 
mined that the bill shall become a law and its provisions 
rigidly enforced. Secretary Knox and the Foreign Relations 
Committees of Congress expect a long-drawn-out diplomatic 
struggle before the pledges of the Anglo-American treaty are 
fully understood. This becomes evident from the fact that a 
few Senators and Congressmen are disposed to defend Eng- 
land's protest, which in turn is likely to cause England to give 
to her protest more vim and persistency. England's interpre- 
tation of the treaty gives the instrument a great deal of power 
in determining rules for the government of the canal and the 
uses it may be put to. This the Washington government denies ; 
it also denies that the canal bill provides for discrimination 
against England or any other nation. Therefore, it is straining 
the meaning of the treaty to protest that the bill favors Ameri- 
can ships above all other ships. England's position on its face, 
as reflected in the protest, could be interpreted to mean that if 
the protest is rejected, the British government would feel jus- 
tified in annulling the canal and other Anglo-American treaties. 

It is not difficult to see what is actuating England in the first 
instance. It is the Canadian transcontinental railways, because 
the pending canal bill includes them, providing against free 
tolls to railway-owned ships. It was the protest against hos- 
tility to all transcontinental railways, which was formulated in 
Canada, that encouraged the British government to "butt in" 
with the charge that the American government was preparing 
to violate the more essential provisions of the Hay-Paunce- 
forte or the Panama Canal Treaties. The Washington govern- 
ment does not deny the charge with its accustomed spirit, but 
hides behind an untenable position. Because the United States 
constructed and owns the Panama Canal it does not follow 
that it may favor Americans above all other nationalities, or 
even favor certain classes of Americans in exacting tolls for 
using the waterway. It does not require a very careful read- 
ing of the Hays-Paunceforte agreement to show that the pend- 
ing canal toll bill is not at all in harmony with either the letter 
or spirit of the treaty. The consent of the nations had to be 
obtained before the United States could undertake the construc- 
tion of the waterway, for all nations have an interest in its con- 
duct, and the Anglo-American treaty is practically between all 
maritime Powers and the United States. 

The suggestion of England that the questions brought up by 
her protest might be referred to the Hague Tribunal for adjudi- 
cation, but the suggestion only shows England's far-seeing 
diplomacy and her cunning way of setting traps to catch the 
unwary. England, Russia, Germany and France would domi- 
nate any Hague tribunal that could be convened. Every one 
of these nations is avowedly hostile to the Monroe Doctrine. 
They regard it as merely a declaration of the United States 
without the sanction of the Europe of to-day; that in no sense 
is the doctrine the result of an international agreement, much 
less is it an international law, and they all tacitly admit that 
it is recognized because of the ability and willingness of the 
United States to enforce its demands. It would be an easy 
matter for any European Power, member of the Hague tribu- 
nal, to identify the doctrine with the canal, and have the tri- 
bunal pass upon the claims of the United States to both its 
exclusive right to say who shall and who shall not use the canal, 
and her right to assume the guardianship of the Latin-American 
States. Thus it will be seen that the treaty itself denies the 
right of the United States to discriminate for or against any 
nation or corporation or individual, as the pending canal toll 
bill provides for. And no one is foolish enough to believe that 



the bill or the Monroe Doctrine would come from a Hague 
tribunal without a lot of broken bones; and, after all, England, 
Germany, France and Russia would rather see the Monroe 
Doctrine discredited than to see the Panama Canal made abso- 
lutely free to all the world. 

Italy has notified the Powers that she is willing to sue 

for peace, guaranteeing an indemnity bounty to Turkey, on 
the basis that the latter concede Italy's rightful ownership of 
the Province of Tripoli and such of the islands of the Egean 
Sea as Italy has already captured, including Rhodes. It is re- 
ported that the Sultan refuses to even consider the proposition. 

The Powers have notified Spain that the young republic 

of Portugal must be left to herself, and not interfered with in 
her present struggle with the royalists. The notification of the 
Powers grew out of a rumor that an army of Spaniards was 
organizing on the border to march to the help of Manuel, the 
banished King of Portugal. 

Now comes Egypt with an elaborate plan to gridiron the 

country with first class highways. It is expected that wonders 
will result in the canal routes of transportation, but back of it 
all is a British need for more and better military roads. 

English suffragists are trying to win out by setting fire 

to the houses of cabinet ministers. They do not take kindly to 
the aftermath, which is a season in jail on bread and water. 

The Republican party of Spain is as badly torn up as 

the Republican party in the United States. In Spain the police 
have to clear the halls to confine the fighting to the streets. 

Russia and Germany are now as close as twin brothers, 

but the Kaiser wants to know more about the Czar's need of 
as many warships as Germany has ready for duty. 

The Russian Douma has sanctioned an appropriation of 

the enormous sum of $800,000,000 to rebuild the navy, but the 
expenditure is to run through six or more years. 

The new Belgian Chamber will consist of 101 Catholics, 

45 Liberals, 38 Socialists and two Christian Democrats, the lat- 
ter a rare specimen of the animal kingdom. 

The suffragists of London cost their friends a little over 

$100,000 for propaganda work during the last year. The treas- 
urer's books show a balance of 29 cents. 

France is reorganizing her naval force into squadrons 

and divisions, and in other ways the nation is making haste to 
be ready for eventualities. 

England has adopted a plan to turn ex-soldiers and 

reservists into farmers. Thus far, former soldiers accept the 
scheme gladly. 

A daring American has descended to the bottom of Vesu- 
vius, just to gratify the curiosity of an alleged scientist. 

Swiss immigration to the United States has fallen off 

greatly in the last two years. 

A revolving wing for driving motor cars is the latest 

French conceit. 

Military air cruisers is the new name for armed airships 

in France. 

India finds a good market in China for Indian cotton 

yarns. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Citizens' Alliance 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

OPEN SHOP 

Unionism has nothing In common with 
democracy or socialism Unionism is Au- 
toeracy, begotten by Politics and Intoler- 
ance and its name is Monopoly. 
CITIZENS' ALLIANCE OFFICES 
Rooms 363-364-365 Rusa Building 
Free Registration Bureau and Employment Office 



July 20, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



35 



DEL MONTE SOCIAL NEWS. 

People of all classes and all climes are awakening to the 
call of the "simple outdoor life." They find the spell so strong 
that the cottages, or even less commodious accommodations, 
are eagerly sought in secluded places where the sound of the 
steam whistle as yet has not penetrated. All around Monterey 
peninsula are the most sheltered and attractive places, and the 
Mayor of San Francisco is not the first to have found just what 
seemed ideal for a summer vacation. The most distracting 
sound that may be heard in that locality near Pebble Beach 
Lodge is the possible honk of the frequently passing auto — 
other seekers after a week's outing and to enjoy the sim- 
plicity and comfort amid the pines. 

The automobile parties have been as thick as a "convention 
of blackbirds" the past few weeks, and a week-end at golf is 
the favorite attraction at Del Monte. Mr. and Mrs. Wakefield 
Baker often drive down in their Locomobile with Miss Marion 
and Mr. Livingston L. Baker, and this time their party is aug- 
mented by Mr. George Bigelow and Miss Helen Keeney. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Tobin arrived Friday from Burlingame in 
their Packard ; also Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Taylor and Mr. and 
Mrs. F. W. McNear of Menlo Park motored down for a week's 
visit. 

Mrs. Theodore F. Payne and Mr. Arthur C. Payne are also 
among the motorists who appreciate Del Monte's ideal com- 
forts and happy times with friends. 

Mrs. J. H. Baxter, with her family, were taking a little motor 
trip down the Coast last week, and after sight-seeing about 
the peninsula, spent a portion of the day at Del Monte. 




"In your civilization," said the barbarian, with the in- 
quiring mind, "the people select a candidate for office, do they 
not?" "Not precisely," replied Senator Sorghum; "the candi- 
date selects himself and then gets out and persuades the people 
to indorse him." — Washington Star. 



Daughter — Since it is your wish, dear parents, that I 

should marry the rich old brewer, I consent, although he is 
seventy years old. Mother — But he is only sixty. Daughter- 
Sixty! Tell him to ask me again in ten years. — Meggendorfer 
Blaetter. 



Since the decision rendered by the United States Supreme 
Court, it has been decided by the Monks hereafter to bottle 

CHARTREUSE 



(Liqueur Peres Chartreux) 

both being identically the same article, under a combi- 
nation label representing the old and the new labels, and 
In the old style of bottle bearing the Monks' familiar 
Insignia, as shown in this advertisement. 

According to the decision of the U. S. Supreme 
Court, handed down by Mr. Justice Hughes on May 
29th, 1911, no one but the Carthusian Monks (P^res 
Chartreux) is entitled to use the word CHARTREUSE 
as the name or designation of a Liqueur, so their victory 
in the suit against the Cusenier Company, representing 
M. Henri Lecouturier, the Liquidator appointed by the 
French Courts, and his successors, the Compagnie 
Fermiere de la Grande Chartreuse, is complete. 

The Carthusian Monks (P£res Chartreux), and they 
alone, have the formula or recipe of the secret process 
employed in the manufacture of the genuine Chartreuse, 
and have never parted with it. There is no genuine 
Chartreuse save that made by them atTarragona.Spaln. 



At first-class Wine Merchants, Grocers, Hotels, Cafes. 

B&tjer & Co., 45 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 



Ask your 
Dealer for 

Goodyear 

"Hippo" 
Hose 

GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 
<. H. PEASE. President 589. S91, 593 Mirket St. 




The best and 

strongest 
Garden Hose 

Guaranteed to 

stand 700 lbs 

Pressure 

TRY IT AND 
BE CONVINCED 

San Francisco 



The accompanying pic- 
ture shows the main business 
entrance to the Anglo and 
London-Paris National Bank 
of San Francisco. The archi- 
tecture is beautiful and the 
accommodations are the equal 
of any banking institution in 
the country. At the close of 
business on June 14, 1912, the 
resources were $39,124,117.28. 
The credit is due to the fol- 
lowing officers : Herbert 
Fleishhacker, president; J. 
Friedlander, vice-president ; 
C. F. Hunt, vice-president; 
R. Altschul, cashier; C. R. 
Parker, assistant cashier; H. 
Choynski, assistant cashier; 
Wm. H. High, assistant cash- 
ier; G. R. Burdick, assistant 
cashier; A. L. Langerman, 
secretary. Directors — Sig. 
Greenebaum, chairman of the 
board; Raphael Weill, I. N. 
Seligman, M. Meyerfeld, Jr., 
N. Ohlandt, M. Fleishhacker, 
R. D. Robbins, A. W. Foster, 
Herbert Fleishhacker, J. C. 
McKinstry, Albert Meyer, Sig. 
Stern, J. J. Mack, Jesse W. 
Lilienthal, William Fries, 
Geo. A. Newhall, I. Steinhart, 
and G. X. Wendling. 




Interior Anglo and London-Paris National Bank, Sutter and Sansome streets, San Francisco. 




qtcls-and- sumcD HOT 





Highland Springs 

RATES— Tents. $12 per week; cottage, $14 to $16; main hotel, $14, 
$16, $17.50. FARE— San Francisco to Highland Springs, train and 
stage, $8 round trip; train and auto, $11 round trip. Special trans- 
portation rates to guests as follows: 1 week's stay at Highland 
Springs, San Francisco to Highland Springs and return by stage. 
$7; by auto, $9.50. 2 weeks' stay, San Francisco to Highland Springs 
and return, by stage. $6.60; by auto. $8.50. Those wishing these 
rates, inquire of Peck-Judah, 637 Market street, or address 

W. H. MARSHALL, Prop., Highland Springs. 



HARBIN SPRINGS 

NEAREST LAKE COUNTY RESORT TO SAN FRANCISCO 
A delightful run over good roads through a beautiful country. 
Automobile supplies kept; facilities for ordinary repairs; wash rack. 
Hot and Cold Tub Baths, Showers, Natural Hot Mineral Water 
Plunge, Swimming Tank, Etc, 

EXCELLENT TABLE. 



Emerald Bay Camp 

Beautifully situated, moderately equipped tents and cottages; 
boating, fishing, bathing, tramping. New management. Nelson L. 
Salter, Prop. Lee S. Seward, Manager. Address Manager, Emer- 
ald Bay P. O., Lake Tahoe, Cal., or Peck-Judah Co., 687 Market St.. 
San Francisco. 



HOWARD SPRINGS 

Lake County's Famous 42 Mineral Springs 

(Under new management) 

Lithia for kidneys; hot iron bath, lio degrees, for rheum- 
atism. The waters of the Hot Magnesia Springs have a wonder- 
ful record in the cure of stomach trouble: S 12 to S 18 oer week. 

R. J. YATEs, Prop.. Howard Springs. Lake County. Cal. 



MOUNTAIN HOME 

In the Santa Cruz Mountains. No better place In Central California 
for hunting, fishing or swimming. Table unsurpassed; delightful 
climate; stage at Morgan Hill Monday, Wednesday and Saturday. 
Excellent roads for automobiles. Train leaves San Francisco at 
7 a. ra. Phone Farmers 51, Madrone. Send for souvenir of Mrs. 
Vic. Poncelet, Llagas, Cal. 



CARR'S 

NEW MONTE RIO HOTEL 

Nearest to Station and River 

New modern hotel, first class fn every detail and equipped with every modern 
convenience. Swimming, boating, canoeing, fishing, launching, horseback 
riding and driving. Address C. F. CARR. Monte Rio. Sonoma Co. Cal. 



CASA DEL REY 



SANTA CRUZ 



CAL. 



New 300-room, fireproof hotel 
located near the beach and the 
Casino, open all the year round 

AMERICAN PLAN 

Tennis Courts, Good boating, 
bathing and fishing; numerous 
drives along the Coast and 
through the mountains. 

SUPERIOR GOLFING 

SANTA CRUZ BEACH HOTEL COMPANY 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Now Open 

Hot Steam Baths Cold Sulphur and Sour Springs 

Address — 

MISS ROSE ANDERSON 

Anderson Springs, Middletown Lake County, Cal. 



FETTERS HOT SPRINGS 

Modern, Convenient, Comfortable. Open all Year 'Round. 
Natural hot mineral springs, bath-house 50 feet from hotel and 
cottages; electric lights, new garage; hot and cold mineral water In 
every room; hunting, fishing, swimming, orchard, vineyard and 
dairy; two blocks from station; auto and "bus meet all trains. Buy 
ticket to Agua Caliente. via N. W. P. or S. P. Address GEO. FET- 
TERS, Fetters Hot Springs, Sonoma County, Cal. 



Brookdale Hotel 

In the heart of the Santa Cruz Mountains, only 2^ hours from 
S. F. White sulphur water springs on hotel grounds. No wind; 
no fog. Climate Ideal. TROUT FISHING, the best In 10 years. For 
information and booklet, write MRS. M. FAIRLEE, Prop., Brook- 
dale, or Peck-Judah's. 



C. J. Boehm, Proprietor. Ben Lomond, Santa Cruz County, Cal. 
18 Trains Dally. 

HOTEL BEN LOMOND 

AND COTTAGES 
C. J. BOEHM, Proprietor 

Rates $2.60 per day. Most beautiful home In the Santa Cruz 
Mountains. Private baths. All modern conveniences. First-class 
tennis and croquet courts. Billiards, Bowling Alley, Boating, Bath- 
ing and Fishing. 



Campers to Yosemite Valley 

Can be supplied with tents, complete camping outfits and all kinds 
of provisions at the Yosemite Valley store. Parties outfitted for 
High Sierra trips and fishing excursions. Rates reasonable. NEL- 
SON L. SALTER. Proprietor. 



GILROY HOT SPRINGS 

Santa Clara County. 

Only four hours from San Francisco. Round trip rate, including 
stage, $5.70. Fine road for automobiles. Full Information and 
folders at Peck-Judah Co., 687 Market St., S. F., or 

w. J. Mcdonald, Prop. 



BEAUTIFUL 



Paraiso Hot Springs 



Now'a the Time to Viait California's Real Paradise 

Weather and roads are unsurpassed. Wonderful natural hot soda 
and sulphur; guaranteed for rheumatism, liver, kidney and all 
stomach troubles. Expert masseurs. Rates $12 to $16, including 
baths. Round trip $6.35, including auto. Mecca for north and 
south bound autos. Logical one-day run. Free workshop and gar- 
age; accessories. Leave Third and Townsend, 9:00 a. m. First and 
Broadway, Oakland 8:00 a. m. Or will meet 4 p. m. train if notified. 
Booklets Feck-Judah or Bryans'. 

H. H. McGOWAN, Prop, and Mgr. 

Paraiso Springs Monterey County 



YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK 

The Outing-Place of California 

SNOWCAPPED MOUNTAINS MIRROR LAKES AND HAPPY ISLES 

THUNDERING WATERFALLS MASSIVE WALLS AND DOMES 

A Galaxy Unsurpassed 

A Smooth. Dustless. Well Sprinkled Road Into Ihe Valley 

A Special Feature of This Season's Trip 

The waterfalls are booming full. Condi- 
tions in the Valley were never better than 
this season. Surrounding mountain peaks and 
watersheds are covered with late snows, 
which insures a lasting flow of water. 

Why visit the commonplace resorts, when 
the sublime and the beautiful beckon you. 
Cost of this trip is now reduced to popular 
prices. Four excellent camps offer the visitor 
the most pleasing entertainment: 
CAMP CURRY, CAMP AHWAHNEE, CAMP 
LOST ARROW, SENTINEL HOTEL. 
Jilach is charmingly and picturesquely situ- 
ated on the floor of the "Valley, surrounded 
by the masterpieces of Nature. 

It is now a quick, comfortable trip Into the 
Valley. For full information or descriptive 
folder, address your camp or hotel In Yosem- 
Ite. any ticket office or information bureau In 
California, or 

YOSEMITE VALLEY RAILROAD COMPANY, Merced, Cal. 




Hotel Westminster 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. Fourth and Main Sta, 

American Plan Reopened. 

Rates per day, $2.50, rooms without bath 
Rooms with bath, $3, $3.50 and $4. 

European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up. 
With bath $1.50 and up. 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



HAMMOCKS 

We have an overstock and will sacrifice these Hammocks at 
a very low price. We are making a specialty of Blue and White 
Canvas Striped Hammocks at $1.25 each. 

WEEKS-HOWE EMERSON COMPANY 



51 Market Street 



San Francisco 



White Diamond Water Co. P ~ W, ""*' A C E£ 

laorperatea' lerkaaar 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 
treated, but bacterlologlcally purified by electrical process. 6 gallons 
DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. $1.60 per month. Single 6 gallon 
bottle, 40 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 66792, 
6716 Telegraph Ave., opposite Idora Park. Oakland, Cal. 

"Why do so many of the fellows go to the big dances 

stag?" "On account of the scarcity of doe, perhaps." — Cornell 
Widow. 



Tallac and Brockway 

LAKE TAHOE 

The scenic resorts that have made Lake Tahoe 
famous. Open June 1st, under same management as in 
past years. Fishing season opens June 1st. 

Autos From Placerville Dally 

The Automobile Trip over the Placerville State Road 
is the most picturesque in America. Two 7-passenger 
Pierce-Arrow automobiles run daily, one leaving Placer- 
ville at 7 a. m. daily; one leaving Tallac at 7 a. m. daily; 
arriving at destinations at noon. 

LAWRENCE & COMSTOCK 

Tallac, Cal. Brockway, Cal. 




Open all the year. New 
ownership. New man- 
agement. New features. 
Forty rooms with private 
baths. 

Golf Tennis Bowling Fishing 

Boating Swimming Club House 

Free Garage 

Everything Possible for Your Comfort and Pleasure 
Rates $17.50 to $25.00 per week, $3.00 to $4.00 per day 

Booklets and other particulars at PECK-JUDAH CO.. or write 
J. M. SHOULTS BEN LOMOND, CAL. 



Lake County 
Automobile Transportation Co. 

Passengers carried by automobile and stages from Pieta to High- 
land Springs, Lakeport, Kelseyville and Upper Lake Fine moun- 
tain scenery over this line. (Special all-rail and auto round-trip 
tickets, San Francisco to Bar tie tt Springs and return, only $18. In- 
cluding trip across beautiful Clear Lake.) Also Soda Bay and re- 
turn for $13.50, including boat on lake. Extra auto charge in addi- 
tion to stage from Pieta to Highland Springs, $1.50; to Lakeport 
$1.50. Tickets on sale at Northwestern Pacific Railroad Company, 
Ferry Building, and 874 Market street, San Francisco. 



RIONIDO HOTEL 

AND TENTS 

The ideal resort of the Russian river. Now open. 
Make your reservations now. Rates $12 per week. 
Address Rionido Co., Rionido, Cal. 



MARK WEST SPRINGS 

Trains leave S. F. twice daily to Fulton, where stages connect. 
Round trip S3. 75, including stage. Excellent table; hot mineral baths. 
All kinds of sports. Address MRS. M. MULGREW, Fulton, Cal. 
Particulars, Peck-Judah, 687 Market St. 



SUMMER RESORTS 

AT HOME. AT THE CLUB. CAFE OR HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 

Always Satisfactory 
GEO. W. CASWELL COMPANY 

510-532-534 Folsom Street Phone Kearny 3610 

Write for samples and prices Mention the News Letter 



THE GABLES 

The hotel that is different Everything new. Nearest hot mineral 
springs to City. Paying guests received. Address 

H. P. MATHEWSON, Sonoma, Cal. 

Buy tickets to Verano. N. W. P. Railway 



38 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 20, 1912. 




INSVMCE 




*<U* 



In these days of swift-moving machinery, and in the rush of 
busy, ordinary life, every man, woman and child is constantly 
exposed to serious accidents; that is the chief reason of the 
rapid growth of the big accident and casualty insurance com- 
panies during the past twenty years. 

The pioneer company in the West, and by far the most pro- 
gressive in its field, is the Pacific Surety Company. For 
twenty-seven years this organization has led its competitors in 
handling all lines of casualty liability in accident, automobile, 
elevator, plate glass and the like, and has built up an enviable 
reputation for energy, efficiency, prompt service and payments. 
Under the management of C. H. Crawford, the company has 
developed a system to a remarkable point of efficiency, where- 
by from 50 to 70 per cent of the serious and fatal accidents 
in any establishment can be easily prevented. With such re- 
sults, capable of mathematical demonstration, and for eco- 
nomic and humanitarian reasons, the prevention of industrial 
accidents becomes an imperative duty. It was along these lines 
that the Pacific Surety Company anticipated the framing of 
the present Workingman's Compensation Act by many years, 
and therefore is in a splendid position to act as an agent in 
meeting its legal and humanitarian requirements at minimum 
charges. 

The curiously inclined can readily make references to the ex- 
traordinary successes of the company in this line, where the 
concentrated efforts of its regularly appointed inspectors have 
been united with the employers in making use of this expert 
service. This service is elastic, and may readily be adapted 
to any plant with equal success, and this invariable success in 
economic benefits for employer and employed has been the 
corner stone on which the Pacific Surety Company, whose 
offices are located in the National Bank Building, has built up 
its enviable reputation during twenty-seven years of steadfast, 

widening business. 

* * * 

We hear considerable favorable comment on the street as to 
the position assumed by the Massachusetts Bonding and Insur- 
ance Company in regard to completing the work on the three 
contracts abandoned by Hoyt Bros., defaulting contractors, 
who had contracts for the construction of the Mark Lally Ware- 
house on Second and Tehama streets in this city, the Weber 
Grammar School at Stockton, and the High School at Gilroy, 
and for whom the Massachusetts Company was surety. 

The surety company stands to lose considerable money in 
making good its suretyship. The fact that the company is 
faithfully making good its obligations ought to weigh in its 
favor with court officials, owners and insurers generally, who 
may have the approval of bonds or desire to secure any kind 
of suretyship, liability, accident, plate-glass or burglary in- 
surance. The company's California managers are Robertson 
& Hall, First National Bank Building. Mr. Hall was formerly 
connected officially with one of the largest Baltimore com- 
panies, and Mr. Robertson is one of the veterans in these lines 
on the Pacific Coast. 

* * * 

George H. Tyson, general agent of the German-American 
Insurance Company, Phoenix Insurance, German Alliance, Pro- 
tector Underwriters and Equitable Fire and Marine, was pre- 
sented with a very handsome silver loving cup at the recent big 
gathering of the many representatives of the organization to 
celebrate the twenty-first anniversary of the creation of the de- 
partment office in 1891. Congratulations and good wishes 
were showered on the recipient by the enthusiastic field and 
office staffs of the five big companies represented. The pre- 
sentation was a heartfelt expression on the part of the em- 
ployees of the high esteem and appreciation in which they hold 
their chief; nothing could have been finer nor more cordial 
than the abundance of good wishes that were loaded to over- 
flowing in the cup. The gift, as pictured above, was appropri- 
ately engraved with the text, "Presented to George H. Tyson 
from the Field and Local Staff of the German-American and 




Phoenix Insurance Companies in Commemoration 
Twenty-First Year as General Agent, 1891-1912." 



of His 



H. Schreiber, of Los Angeles, has brought suit against tV.e 
Great Eastern Casualty, asking $100,000 damages for the ac- 
tion of the company in cancelling in May a contract whereby be 
acted as California general agent for the defendant's industrial 
accident and health department. Schreiber claims that his 
profits under the contract would amount to $20,000 a year, and 
that he had expended large sums of money in establishing his 
agency, all of which will be covered by the $100,000 which 
he asks the court to award him as damages. Schreiber repre- 
sented the Great Eastern Casualty for industrial accident and 
health lines only. Jas. C. Hayburn, the well-known San Fran- 
cisco general agent, represents the company in California for 

all other lines. 

• « * 

The Hartford Life has decided to pass its semi-annual divi- 
dend, payable this month. It is officially announced that con- 
ditions do not warrant the usual 10 per cent annual dividends 
that have been paid during the past five years. It has gener- 
ally been expected that the dividends would be omitted for 
awhile. The company wrote $2,000,000 new business in June, 
the total for the first six months of the year being over 

$6,000,000. 

* * * 

The Southern Surety is another to join the companies now 
embarking on writing workingmen's compensation insurance. 
Its capital has been increased to $1,000,000, with a like sum 
as surplus. 



July 20. 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



39 



The Reliance Life of Pittsburgh announces, effective as of 
July 1st, the inclusion of a new "Distributive Disability Clause" 
in its policy contracts. The new clause provides that in case of 
total and permanent disability, from any cause whatever, pay- 
ment of premiums will cease and an income equal to one per 
cent per month of the face of the policy will be paid the as- 
sured. There will be no increase in premium for this provision. 
The new clause, providing for the payment of indemnity to dis- 
abled policyholders, will be inserted at the same extra pre- 
mium as was charged for the former "Total Disability Clause." 

The Modern Woodmen of America is finding its increase in 
rates and the strong fight that is being made against it by the 
insurgent members an expensive proposition in various ways. 
The May meeting of the directors authorized bills of $84,416 
for the expense of rate revision, while during May there were 
54,615 suspensions and only 2,107 new members. There were, 
however, 20,163 reinstatements during the month. The Modern 
Woodmen in Kansas who are protesting against the increase in 
rates have called a convention to be held at Hutchinson, July 
30th, to consider secession from the national organization and 
the formation of a new body. 

An interesting insurance feature was disclosed in the con- 
viction and sentence to life imprisonment on a charge of second 
degree murder of Robert Willis, a colored bartender of Cincin- 
nati. The hearing on the appeal, which affirmed the judgment 
of the lower court, developed the fact that Hiram Hendricks, 
whom he killed, had been in over a score of shooting affrays 
and carried a special insurance policy payable only on condi- 
tion that he were murdered, with a provision that no payment 
was to be made if the murder was justified. The evidence 
showed that the policy had been paid. 

Life insurance business in Canada showed a rapid growth 
during the year 1911. The premiums totaled $31,619,626, an 
increase of $1,847,723 over 1910, while the amount paid out in 
claims aggregated $11,043,274, an advance of only $146,804. 
The total amount of life insurance in force at the end of 1911 
was $950,413,633 on 1,335,047 policies. The increase in the 
amount in force during the year was $94,300,274, the new 
policies numbering 162,922. 

The Burglary Insurance Underwriters' Association took offi- 
cial notice of the alarming increase in burglary losses in Cali- 
fornia at its meeting at New York last week, the subject receiv- 
ing considerable discussion. A resolution was finally adopted, 
increasing burglary insurance rates in the State to the sched- 
ule charged in Cook County, 111., where losses have also been 
heavy. The increase adopted is about 45 per cent over the 
rates that have heretofore been charged in California. 

The Universal Life and Accident Insurance of this city has 
quit business after some six months' experience. It was or- 
ganized with a capital of $500,000, divided into 50,000 shares 
of $10 each. At the time the company widely advertised that 
it would operate chiefly among liquor dealers, and would write 
their policies on the same basis as those of other citizens. The 
stock of the company was taken, and most of the offices held by 
men connected with the liquor interests. 

The American Bonding, through its local office, has just 
written the bond of the Grant-Smith Company on the $517,000 
contract for the construction of the new concrete pier 26 on 
the water front harbor improvement. The company also han- 
dled the bond covering the construction of the $210,000 car 
barn for the new Geary street line. 

The supreme council of the United Commercial Travelers 
has rejected, by a practically two-thirds vote, the so-called flat- 
rate insurance constitutional amendments. The flat rate would 
have provided annual dues of $15 to take the place of the as- 
sessment plan now followed. Another amendment providing 
for the issuing of an insurance contract containing simply the 
benefits of the insurance feature of the constitution was laid 
over for one year for further consideration. 

The largest "group policy" ever written is now being under- 
taken by the Equitable Life in an arrangement to insure 10,- 
000 men on the New York police force, the aggregate insurance 
being $12,000,000. The limit policy will be $3,000 in any one 
case. The premium rate will be about $15 per thousand. 

An effort is being made by the present city administration 
to introduce a system of fire drills in all the large local whole- 
sale establishments. Fire Chief Murphy is sounding business 
men on the practicability of the idea. 

The San Francisco Life has been admitted to the State of 
Washington. 




Pacific Mutual Life 
Ins. Co. of California 

Insure Against 
LOSS OF INCOME 

EARNING POWER 

or SALARY 




l/U^z^t-jK-^L 



SHREVE BUILDING 



Manager Accident Department 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital $1,500,000 



Assets $8,650,000 



California and Sanaome Streets, 
San Franclaco, California. 



Capital, (400.000 



Assets. Over a Million 



Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OP CALIFORNIA 
(Best In the West.) 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams. Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass Accident and Health 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; Marshal A. Frank, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Joy Llchtensteln. Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurer; F. P. 
Deerlng, Counsel. L. B. Hoge, General Manager Accident and Health De- 
partment. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 416 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The We& Coa& Life Insurance Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

Geo. E. Billings Roy C. Wird James K. Polk J. C. Meussdorfftr Jane* W. Dees 

GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED 



S12 California St., San Franclaco, Cal. 



Phone Douglaa 22*1 
Home Phone C llll 



The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1860. 
Sixty-Second Annual Statement. 

Capital .11. 000.006 

Burplue to Policyholder 3,117,2!! 

Total Aaaeta 7,617,091 

Pacific Department: 

Alaska Commercial Building ..... San Franclaco 

Benjamin J. Smith. Manager. 



REMEMBER!!! 

We write 

Liability Insurance, in all its branches, Automobile, Plate Glass, 
Burglary, Elevator, and Health and Accident Insurance. 
PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY 
San Francisco, Cal. C. H. CRAWFORD. President 



40 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 20, 1912. 



BANKING 



One of the light and airy 
lobbies of the Safe Deposit 
Vaults of the 

WELLS FARGO NEVADA 
NATIONAL BANK OF 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Adjoining this lobby is the 
ladies' reception room where 
every modern convenience will 
be found. 

BOXES $4.00 PER YEAR 
AND UPWARD 




N. E. 



VALUABLES TAKEN FOR STORAGE 
Corner Market and Montgomery Streets 




ANGLO & LONDON 

PARIS NATIONAL 

BANK 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Paid-Up Capital *«. 000.000 

Surplus and Undivided Profit* $1,600,000 
Total Resource! (40.000,000 

OFFICERS; 

HERBERT FLEISHH ACKER President 

SIG. GRKENEBAUH Chairman of the Board 



JOS. FRIEDUKDER 


Vicc-Prendcnl 


C. F. HUHT 


Vice-President 


R. ALTSCHTJL 


Cashier 


C. R. PARKER 


Assistant Cashier 


WM. II liHIII 


Assistant Cashier 


H. CB0YSSKI 


Aisittant Cashier 


O. R. BURDICK 


AniiUnl Cashier 


A. L. LANGERJHaN 


Secretary 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



H1AD OFFICE. TORONTO 

SIR EDMUND WALKER C. V. 0.. LL. D.. D. C. L. 

President 

ALEXANDER LAIRD General Uniitei 



ESTABLISHED 1867 

Paid-up Capital, $15,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 12,500,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are Is- 
sued in denominations of 

$10, $20, $50, $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable In Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland Is stated on the face of each cheque, while In other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rateB. 

The cheques and all Information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

460 California Street, corner Leldeadorff. 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

(The German Bank) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The following Branches for Receipt and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission St., Between 21st and 22nd 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 Clement St., cor. 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 Haight St., Near Masonic Ave. 

June 29th, 1912 
Assets ----., 
Capital actually paid up in Cash 
Reserve and Contingent Funds 
Employees' Pension Fund 
Number of Depositors ... 



$51,140,101.75 

1,000,000.00 

1,656,403.80 

140,109.60 

56,609 



Office Hours : 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays 
to 12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 
o'clock p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 



PROGRESS IN AERIAL NAVIGATION. 

History proves that all ideas that have become successful 
eventually returned to the original idea. The frail air craft 
has proven clearly that it is possible to navigate the air, but 
nothing practical so far has been accomplished. There has 
come practically no change in conception, and the various in- 
ventors who astound the world with their balloons, dirigible 
and propelled, have traveled but a little way from the original 
ideas embodied in the invention of Frederick Marriott, Sr., who 
in the sixties, about three or four, invented the dirigible, self- 
propelled balloon or airship that is printed in the News Letter 
to-day. 

The cigar shape, the dream of still earlier geniuses, is still 
the same conception from which the inventor finds it impossible 
to escape. What little advance has been made is in the pro- 
pelling engine, and in the lightness of the materials used. In 
the invention of Mr. Frederick Marriott, Sr., the engine was in- 
stalled amidships, and the great gas bag was indented or hol- 
lowed out at this particular spot to allow of its being placed in 
such a position as not to interfere with the progress of the air- 
ship by offering a projecting object that would create more or 
less friction while passing through the air. 

The Marriott airship, the "Avator," was guided in its move- 
ments upward or downward in the air by the action of various 
planes, extending from the sides of the balloon. 

With modern methods and appliances now at hand, it is not 
improbable that the Marriott idea of aerial navigation will soon 
become a realization. 



BIG EXPOSITION IN 1912. 

In San Jose the first week of September, and for ten days, 
there will be held one of the grandest expositions ever known in 
California, with departments including everything of interest 
to the versatile people of this Golden State. Everything will 
be represented to hold the interest of the large assemblage of 
people there, from the agricultural, floral and fruit, to the auto- 
mobile, aeroplane and balloon departments. 

Especially interesting to the stock men and those interested 
in breeding the very best live stock are the big cash prizes, over 
$3,000, as well as the many special prizes. The fat-stock 
raisers alone will show droves of the finest meat in the land. 
Many grand prizes will be offered in every class as well. 

The people with mechanical turn of minds will find interest 
in the many firms displaying the newest and most up-to-date 
machinery, implements and inventions that make work "no 
work at all" in this 20th century. To see machinery in opera- 
tion is very instructive as well as interesting, so a large tract of 
ground has been especially reserved for the demonstration of 
all machinery. $40 first prize and $30 second prize will be 
given for the best displays of agricultural machinery, and 
other prizes, have resulted in a large number of firms com- 
peting. 



ARMOR PLATE SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of Union Safe Deposit Company in Building of 

UNION TRUST COMPANY 

of San Francisco 
Junction of Market and O'Farrell Streets and Grant Avenue 




Largest, Strongest and Most Conveniently Arranged 
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IS PLANNING A 




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A well made Peach Short Cake is a de- 
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Wonderful Water 
Pageant 

For the following dates : 

July 20th to July 28th, Inclusive 

Yacht Regattas Motor Boat Races 

Review of American Battleships 
Parade of Decorated Water Floats 
Swimming and Rowing Contests 

Surf-Bathing, Dancing, Golf, Tennis, Fire-Works 

Don't Miss The Fun 

Regular rates at new Hotel Casa del Rey 

Special low ticket fares 

ASK OUR AGENTS 

Southern Pacific 

Flood Building Palace Hotel 

Third and Townsend Street Station 

Market Street Ferry Station 

San Francisco 

Broadway and Thirteenth Street 
Oakland 




FftMSClteQ 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXIV 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 27, 1912 



No. 4 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTBR AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at Son Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office— (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, and 156 Fifth 
avenue. S. L. Carman, representatives. 

Chicago Office — H. L. Selden, 122 South Michigan Boulevard. 

Boston Office — Charles S. Parr, 525 Tremont Temple. 

London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements, or other matter Intended for publication in 
the current number of the SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 
CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, should be sent to the office not later than 
5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, $2.25. 
Foreign — 1 year, $6.00: 6 morths, $3.26. 



The motorcycle "cop" may be classified as the mosquito 

of gasolinedom. 

Observe the smile that lights the later photographs of 



the "Princeton schoolmaster." 

— —Snow in Michigan in July. The weather this year ap- 
pears to be as badly mixed and as freakish as the politics. 

White pajamas without ruffles for the marines of the 

United States navy — and just plain nighties for the jackies? 

"The Toad" didn't seem to hop very high or far when re- 
moved from his native Carmel to classical, critical Berkeley. 

■ Editor-professor Rowell's feelings toward Senator Works 

are hard to express without the use of red ink and red language. 

The best way to get back at the lordly butcher is to for- 
sake him for the lowly fishman seven days a week instead of 
one. 

While the weather remains warm at the East it wouldn't 

be such a bad idea to put some kind of a muzzle on the bull 
moose. 

One sure sign of the height of the "silly season" is that 

the newspapers are betrothing Katherine Elkins again — this 
time to an American. 

Conditions are improving somewhat, but one still needs 

sand-goggles and mountaineering boots to navigate San Fran- 
cisco's down-town district. 

A Mrs. Goodeve is suing a prominent Oregonian for 

breach of promise. Now, why do you suppose she ever wanted 
to change a name like that? 

Yesterday Don Gaspar de Portola, king of a San Fran- 
cisco carnival, and now a $100-a-month clerk in the Registrar's 
office. Well, even royalty must eat. 

To every owner of a garden these are melancholy days. 

The ruses have dried up, berries of all kinds are withering, peas 
and beans are badly in need of rain, and indeed the limit has 
about been reached on all growing things, save only corn. Ar- 
tificial watering, without water, fails to mitigate the sad situ- 
ation. 



Judge Hanford's health was so impaired by an acute at- 
tack of investigationitis that he felt himself compelled to resign 
by telegraph from f he Federal bench. 

The next time anybody asks us for the job of Governor, 

let's pledge him not to do politics during business hours; or, if 
he does, to refund a just proportion of his salary. 

It must have taken nearly all the year's laurel crop in 

Sweden to deck the brows of the American athletes who came, 
saw and took nearly everything there was at Stockholm. 

Light on the highly altruistic views and practices of the 

I. W. W. is thrown by the prosecution of one of the organiza- 
tion's legal lights for failure to support his minor child. 

Dying, Andrew Lang, one of the world's foremost lit- 
terateurs, was good for a dozen lines. That same day the base- 
ball scores filled many columns. News is a funny thing. 

If you do not believe that the bull moose is the king of 

beasts, then you are not a true "holy roller" progressive, and 
you are not welcome at the executive mansion in Sacramento. 

With characteristic promptness Japan is the first foreign 

nation to come site-picking. From this on, the directors of the 
big show will pretty nearly live in their silk hats and long-tailed 
coats. 

When the District Attorney and the Police Chief fall out 

it is good business for the tenderloin operators of whatever kind 
to turn down their lights, trim the dances, and put the soft pedal 
on the music. 

Sometime Senator Lorimer's faithful constituents turned 

out and paraded him in the same old style when he came home 
togaless and disgraced. And yet it has been said that republics 
are ungrateful ! 

Talk about the "wild and woolly West!" There never 

was anything more desperadoish than the calculated killing of 
the gambler who was telling too much about the alliance of the 
police and vice in the big city. 

Equipped with his faithful pipe and a stock of red ban- 
danas, Governor Johnson will campaign for the bull moose in 
Illinois. Meanwhile the statehouse at Sacramento can run itself 
just as it has done during most of Hiram's incumbency. 

Senator Works will not join with the "thou-shalt-not- 

stealers" who swiped his toga for him ; he won't support Roose- 
velt; he won't stand for the proposed third party thefts; he 
won't resign. What an obstinate and ungrateful old person! 

Certain elderly females are making war on the tight 

skirt of current fashion, holding it to be an incentive to wicked- 
ness. Certain younger females are at the same time making 
war on the chaperone idea. Thus we see how good and evil 
balance in the world. 



The difference between police 
"Black Silk" Translated, "systems" here and in New York 

appears to be chiefly that the 
stakes and the game are smaller in San Francisco. The meth- 
ods are about the same, and the scope includes even murder, 
if that be necessary. 

What everybody — every "wise" body — has long known keeps 
on coming out with relation to a peculiarly bad regime in our 
Hall of Justice. We mean the regime in which Chief John Mar- 
tin used to keep open house for his friends and associates, 
among them such as "Kid" Sullivan, acknowledged and avowed 
king of the local pickpockets. The excuse used to be that 
Martin was only a "good fellow;" that he was "too easy-going" 
to keep the agreeable masters of the underworld at arms' length. 
The truth seems to be that Martin was a cormorant, a wolf, a 
grabber; that he did not care where it came from as long as he 
"got his" — to employ the vernacular with which Martin is 
familiar. 

The latest revelation is plucked out of the memorandum book 
of a Chinese under examination on a charge of forgery. There 
is written in English the name of one of Martin's patrolmen 
whose special assignments took him into Chinatown. There, 
too, is written in tea-box Chinese this very significant sentence : 
"The Chief of Police demands some black silk, much or Utile. 
Send it on from Chinatown, and it will be alright." 

Now the Chief of Police of that time was, unhappily for San 
Francisco, John Martin. Let it be further known that, accord- 
ing to government expert authority, "black silk" is Chinese 
slang for blackmail, tribute money, the hush fund — any kind of 
material payment for a secret illegal consideration; it is a term 
used especially in connection with the bribing of an official to 
be blind. Remember, also, that bribery and official extortion 
were fine arts in China before there was an America on the map. 
"Black silk" is a phrase probably as old as the Christian era. 
The man who wrote it in the book of Ng Fook, accused forger, 
meant Martin when he wrote "Chief of Police," and he meant 
tribute money when he put down "black silk." 

No wonder there are persistent attempts to belittle this im- 
portant revelation. We are quite prepared to believe that per- 
sons high in the police world tried to get the expert to suppress 
this interesting item. The names of these philanthropists 
should be revealed at once to the grand jury. It looks as if Ng 
Fook's business-like habits may result in some distinct public 
good if this clue is carefully and vigorously followed up. 

3ST 

When the sideshow tent is opened 
"The Bull Moose" Circus, at Chicago and the public is ad- 
mitted to see the famous "bull 
moose," probably enough of that quadruped will be revealed as 
a freak. It will have a superfluity of legs or an extra eye in 
the middle of its massive forehead, or it will be just plain steer 
with horns on it. Anyway, the affair will be a sideshow in the 
fullest sense of that term as employed by the circus men. 

Already the third party movement is an invitation to laugh 
except for the Colonel himself, and for practical reformers like 
Johnson, Earl, Lissner and Dixon, or solemn owls like Rowell. 
Borah, Hadley, Deneen, effectually put the extinguisher on 
it as a prospective political illumination when they refused to 
leave their party at the behest of the "bull moose." And then 
came even "Grandpa Works," the Senatorial creature of Cali- 
fornia's ruthless reform machine, refusing also to join the move- 



ment, and even stigmatized its proposal to steal electoral votes 
as bad and shocking. By return wire, the California "reform- 
ers" who have made him senator asked him to resign. Quite as 
promptly Works refused. It is a lovely mess, and Governor 
Hiram Johnson is in the thickest and loveliest of it. 

In only six States can Roosevelt hope to misuse reform 
machinery for the manipulation of the ballot as is intended to 
be done in California. At least two of these States, Texas and 
Oklahoma, are certain to go Democratic, and California may do 
likewise. Thus Roosevelt will be unable to go into the electoral 
college with enough votes to make him a factor. Even if he 
stole and actually got away with the entire vote of the six States 
where loyal bull moosers control the Republican machinery, he 
would not be of any consequence in the final counting. 

It is the opinion of wise political observers that the sure 
consequence of the proposed bull moose theft of the Republican 
title in California will be to deliver the State to Wilson. And 
that will probably mean that the Governor will have a Demo- 
cratic legislature to face next January — a legislature that would 
make faces at his steam roller, and might even do some prying 
and poking into the records of State offices under the rule of 
the pure but haughty Hiram. 

Locally, and in the other so-called "insurgent" States, there 
are strong and unmistakable signs of reaction against the 
seceders from the Republican party who are now trying to get 
back inside the walls long enough to wreck the establishment. 
That reaction must grow stronger from now to November. In 
States situated as California is, with the bull moosers in the 
saddle and utterly without scruple, the only recourse for the dis- 
gusted and outraged Republican will be to give his support to 
Wilson. Any such may well do so: the results will be a step 
forward for the real Americanism. 



The "Report" of 

Engineer Freeman. 



Closer examination of Engineer 
Freeman's $50,000 "report" impels 
us to reverse an early and hasty 
judgment. It is not worth the money 
— in truth, it is not worth anything, either from the professional 
or the public standpoint, or as a work of high-priced art. Mr. 
Freeman would hardly have dared send such a document to a 
first class publisher as "copy." It is little more than a printer's 
"dummy." Many of the illustrations are merely clippings from 
unnamed magazines and journals. It is a production likely to 
subject us to scornful criticism when it goes before the army 
board as the last word of San Francisco's Hetchy-Hetchy case. 

Nor, aside from the wretched poverty of its form and make- 
up, does the report contain anything intrinsically valuable to 
the city. If this is the best we can do for ourselves after all 
the years, and ail the expense and all the "experting" we have 
had, then we might as well confess judgment now and save 
further waste of time and coin. 

We wonder how the department will take the conclusion of 
Mr. Freeman that the Garfield permit is inadequate, and that we 
must have the Hetch-Hetchy first with a much wider liberality 
of conditions. We wonder how the national opponents of any 
impairment of the Hetch-Hetchy's natural scenic beauty will 
take that recommendation — and we wonder how the Hetch- 
Hetchyites will meet the new line of arguments sure to be ad- 
vanced on this score. 

But there is a phase of this matter which still more deeply 
concerns every San Franciscan, every resident of the bay re- 



27. 1912. 



and California .Advertiser 



gion. It is not to be questioned that we must have a Sierra 
source of water supply if we are to do much more growing— if 
we are to do any at all here in San Francisco. If what Mr. Free- 
man tells us is true, then we shall not have it in this generation 
—not if we stick to the Hetch-Hetchy folly. Seventy miles of 
tunnel work will be required, says Engineer Freeman, to bring 
in any water from Hetch-Hetchy. And not a foot of that work 
can be done, nor even planned — not a penny can be raised for 
the planning — until we have a new permit, or probably an Act of 
Congress, giving us irrevocable rights to the use of the Hetch- 
Hetchy source, lands and supply. Some bright mind on the 
Hetch-Hetchy side might turn up for us exact information as 
to how long it would take to drive seventy miles of tunnel and 
what it would cost. 

On the whole, Mr. Freeman's report is a revelation. The only 
real good that can come from it is the public conclusion to quit 
the whole Hetch-Hetchy foolishness and concentrate our money 
and our energies on bringing in another Sierra source that we 
can buy and pay for at a reasonable figure and have delivered 
to us within a reasonable time. And while we are about it, pure 
water in abundance should be considered before a contaminated 
source that will require a filtration system to purify the water. 

SB- 
Alfalfa is not exactly indigenous to 
California's Alfalfa. California— rather it is an adopted 
foreign child. Its original name 
was "lucerne," and came from the Mediterranean districts of 
Spain and settled in Southern California in early Spanish 
colonial days. For many years alfalfa was unknown in Amer- 
ica outside of California, but even when its cultivation began 
to spread to adjoining regions it seemed to hesitate to leave the 
State, for it had been taught in its early days that it could not 
live and prosper without the help of irrigation, and that it could 
not live at all in semi-arid regions, but in recent years it has 
learned from experience that it can live and prosper on moun- 
tain side, and that, with half a chance, it could supplant clover 
and other animal food grasses, and live and do well without 
irrigation. The Mormons of Utah were the first to discover the 
adaptability of California alfalfa to the semi-arid soil of moun- 
tain plateau and valley. 

From Utah the reputation of California alfalfa spread like 
wild-fire, and there also went forth a certified statement of the 
wonderful value of the new discovery as an animal food, as well 
as its ability to repeat itself several times a year. From Utah, 
California alfalfa started to spread over the Pacific Northwest, 
and successfully braved the up or dry lands of that region, and 
proved that it could grow and thrive without artificial watering. 
From the Northwest, where it proved its real value, California 
alfalfa spread in all directions, until it covered over 350,000 
acres in the South and Southeast, and nearly 200,000 acres east 
of the Mississippi. In the whole country, California alfalfa 
claims 4,800,000 acres as its own, reducing by competition 
the clover acreage to less than two and a half million. In semi- 
arid regions it has been shown that California alfalfa is capable 
of accommodating itself to nearly all kinds of conditions, and 
that it often reaches to a depth of sixty feet in search of 
moisture. And nearly all this revolution in the production of 
live stock food has been in the last ten years. In more ways 
than one, California is the banner State of the nation for climate, 
fruits, nuts, vegetables and comfortable existence and long life, 
to say nothing of the 4,800,000 acres of agricultural land in the 
United States in possession of California's brand of hay that 
produces almost a dozen crops a year. 
_ 

The French Electoral Reform Bill provides for fewer 

members of the House of Deputies. 



Physical Prowess 
Not in a Trust. 



One of the most beneficial results of 
the Olympic games is their demon- 
stration that no race and no country 
has a monopoly of physical prowess. 
Our athletes may be pardoned, of course, for their patriotic 
eagerness to sweep the board, but such an outcome would be a 
misfortune. A close contest is to be desired for many reasons 
and the better prizes are distributed the better for the future 
of the games. There is probably less difference than is gen- 
erally supposed between different races and nations in latent 
capacity for athletics. A country of tall, heavy people may 
produce better wrestlers, but where stature is lower and bulk 
less, other fields for distinction will be found. How many 
racial stocks take kindly to baseball we are seeing here in 
America; in athletics the only question of importance is what 
a man can do. It would be hard to show that there is any direct 
connection between athletics and national stamina. Half a 
century ago America would have made a poor showing, yet it 
was not a nation of weaklings. Generally speaking, success 
comes with effort; the brilliant success of American athletes is 
the result of hard work. In so big a country, peopled by many 
races, the existence of unlimited latent capacity was a matter 
of course, and no people has shown more enthusiasm for com- 
petitive sports or has practiced them more strenuously or with 
more scientific efficiency. The victories are well earned, though 
the price may have been a little high. 



Western Canada 
Loyal to Reciprocity. 



Western Canada persists in its loy- 
alty to the cause of freer trade with- 
in the empire and reciprocity of 
commerce with the United States. 
In the provincial elections of Saskatchewan last week, with this 
as the crucial issue, the electorate returned by a ratio of five to 
one members of Parliament committed to support of the Liberal 
cause. In the campaign literature circulated by the Liberals 
and in their spokesmen's speeches the radical note of Western 
opposition to further Eastern domination of Dominion politics 
was struck, and it had its effect upon voters who were open to 
the sectional appeal. For this reason, if for no other the ver- 
dict is significant, and it registers history-making in a way 
parallel to the recent trend in the United States. As the vast 
reaches of the western provinces of the Dominion grow in popu- 
lation, as, with the opening of the Panama Canal the cities and 
ports of the Pacific frontage gain in importance, Quebec and On- 
tario will have relatively less power, politically and economi- 
cally considered. 

The obstinacy shown by voters of Western Canada in con- 
tinuing to favor friendlier trade relations with the United States 
no doubt is disturbing to the Conservative peace of mind; but 
it has its counterpart in the hope and faith of the veteran Liberal 
leader. Sir Wilfrid Laurier, who continues both to cherish and 
to utter the belief that the compact that he worked out with 
President Taft will some day be operative. 

While the presidential campaign now engrosses the attention 
of the voters of the republic, there is a minority carefully not- 
ing the way Canadian currents are running, and co-operating so 
far as possible in the effort to keep the American thought open 
and friendly to the idea of reciprocity. 



A company with a capital of $9,000,000 has been organ- 
ized for the purpose of mining nickel. It appears to be antici- 
pated in some quarters that the new 3-cent piece with the hole in 
it. and the new 5-cent piece with the buffalo head, are to make 
the United States a small change country. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 



San Francisco is spending a fabu- 
For a "Beautiful Way." lous sum of money in making 

ready for the Panama-Pacific Ex- 
position, for a Civic Center, boulevards, an adequate water sup- 
ply, a municipal street railway, incineration plants, street im- 
provements, and many other kinds of public and private expen- 
ditures for the betterment and beautifying of the city, which is 
nothing more than would be expected of the most progressive 
municipality in the United States. None of these expenditures 
reflect extravagance or thoughtless prodigality- Coming events 
that cluster about the preparations for the Exposition are, or 
will be, so far reaching in their influence on the future of San 
Francisco as fully to justify expenditures on a scale of equally 
great magnitude. The occasion is nothing less than the enter- 
tainment of the people of all lands, and their welcome to the 
city should not be clouded by inadequateness of the greeting. 
Too much could not be done by the world's host to make the 
coming and stay of its guests enjoyable, attractive and educa- 
tional, and at the same time in no particular should San Fran- 
cisco fail by word or neglect to fully appreciate that San Fran- 
cisco is playing the part of a generously hospitable host to 
guests from the four quarters of the earth. Hospitality with- 
out proper ornamentation and attractiveness of the "King's 
Palace" would conduce to disappointment and regret. 

But one decidedly useful ornamentation and companion piece 
of the contemplated Civic Center and boulevard system has 
been overlooked. The Ocean Beach highway, running from 
the Cliff House southward, has a most picturesque location for 
a popular boulevard and promenade, starting, as it does, at the 
base of a high and commanding promontory, and following the 
water's edge of the Pacific Ocean for miles southward in full 
view of passing ships, could and should be improved so that it 
will be called San Francisco's alameda (beautiful way. I All 
that is required to make the thoroughfare the most attractive 
and delightful drive and promenade is a few improvements. 
For instance, there should be substantially paved walks on 
either side of the highway, with resting places liberally sup- 
plied, with comfortable seats at short intervals. Along the 
entire length of the way, ornamental trees and flower banks 
should be planted, together with drinking fountains at con- 
venient places. Then the city's alameda would be the most 
attractive part of the city for promenading, automobile riding 
and pleasure strolls for recreation. The location and surround- 
ings for just such a public promenade and riding thoroughfare 
could not be found in any other American city; besides, the 
first cost and subsequent maintenance would be insignificant, 
comparatively speaking. San Francisco has so many attrac- 
tions, and when the Civic Center and boulevards are added to 
them, there would seem to be nothing else to be desired in the 
way of attractiveness and beautifying the State's metropolis 
than the proposed Beautiful Way. Let the agitation begin 
forthwith. 

38T 

Doubtless the Game and Fish Com- 
Narrow Interpretation missioners are technically right in 
Of the Law. enforcing the game laws as they 

do, but it is doubtful if the framers 
of the law had in mind to oblige those in authority to ignore 
the rule of reason and banish common sense from their inter- 
pretation of the law. The law distinctly says it is an offense 
to catch crabs measuring less than seven inches, and an equal 
offense to catch trout weighing less than one pound, which is 
alright, or would be alright if good judgment were used in de- 
termining the weight and measure of crabs and trout when 
once caught. A trout might easily enough weigh the required 
full pound when first caught, and by the time the inspecting 



official got around to inspect, the fish may have fallen off in 
weight a little, which might very logically be attributed to 
changes in atmospheric conditions, but if so, technically speak- 
ing, the individual having the trout in his possession would be 
amenable to the law and subject to a heavy penalty, whereas if 
the inspector would stop to consider by comparison the differ- 
ence in conditions in the water and out of the water, nearly al- 
ways he would find the depreciation in the trout's weight came 
of natural causes. A fish always deteriorates when transferred 
from the water to the basket. This fact it is the moral if not 
the legal duty of the inspector to respect and consider. The 
same is equally true concerning the crab. In both cases a little 
exercise of common sense would prevent a lot of wholly unin- 
tentional injustice and hardship. 

There is still another reason why game and fish inspectors 
should not hold so tenaciously to legal technicalities. Not all 
fishermen and hunters fish and hunt for the sport there is in it. 
Conditions under which food is obtained in these days of 
high cost of living send many persons to the forests and the 
streams to secure food, without which opportunity to provide 
the home with meat, the home would have to endure the pangs 
of hunger. The fish and game laws are alright, and are not to 
blame for the poverty of reason in fish and game inspectors. 
What is wanted, and wanted right away, is a game and fish in- 
spection that inspects, not so much to discover law breakers for 
the fine there is in the detection, but to apply the rule of reason 
and discriminate between actual food hunters and chronic law 
breakers, and also between the latter and a hungry man who is 
honestly trying to replenish his larder without even a thought 
of violating the technicalities of a law as interpreted by a man 
who thinks he must convict in any event to earn his salary. 



The entente recently established between England ar.d 

Germany is being badly shattered by Germany's new African 
policy, which England regards as a hostile program, because it 
contemplates laying the foundation for an empire in Southern 
and Southwestern Africa under the German flag — Germany to 
use the French Kongo State for the base of the new nation. 
For the momem, London and Berlin are talking nothing but 
war, and the feeling in both nations is bitter and resentful, 
mainly so on the part of England, because the London govern- 
ment believes that Germany's scheme contemplates the seizure 
of the Kongo Free State, which would threaten England's new 
African federation. If the Kaiser persists, the relations of 
Germany and England will immediately become strained to the 
danger point — a point which neither nation is trying very 
hard to avoid. 





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SCOTCH 


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From MACKXE & CO. 
ISL.AY. SCOTLAND 

Never in Bulk 

Charles Meinecke &. Co. 

Aocnts Pacific Coast 314 SACRAMENTO ST., S. F. 




F TOWf CRJER, 



• ■ " ' .I. 



"Hear the Crier? Who the devil art thou?" "One that will play the derll. «lr. with you." 




Sidelights on the Darrow case disclose several kinds 

of singular mental angularities. Among others is Lincoln Stet- 
fens, the opportunist reformer, who frankly states that he knew 
the MacNamaras were guilty at the time he was working to 
save them, but that he considered their crime a product of our 
social conditions. Of such stuffy stuff are his tribe of reformers 
made. 

William Lorimer, the Senator recently ousted from Con- 
gress, was slightly injured the other day in an automobile mix- 
up, which leaves the interested to infer that there was a spot on 
his badly belabored body that the whitewash and the bootjack 
failed to reach. 

England's foremost physician is reported to have said 

that woman suffrage is a disease. The comic papers regard the 
movement as a joke, and the pessimist as a prank of Fate. 
Through all this diverse opposition the suffragette works her 
way insistently towards the ballot. 

Last week Tonopah was scourged with a big fire which 

destroyed several hundred thousand dollars' worth of property. 
A few days later it was flooded with a cloudburst. If misfor- 
tunes came in triplets, on which midriff will the town receive its 
next whack by malignant Fate. 

New York is boasting that she leads the world in a jewel 

collection valued at $250,000,000. California has several natu- 
ral resources that net her that much annually, and she still has 
time to squander on giving a world's exposition and running 
several leagues of baseball. 

It has cost New York over a billion dollars to develop 

its present rapid transit system in order to get visitors in and 
out of the city. That sum isn't a marker to what it has cost those 
visitors to get in and out of that city's hotels. 

August Belmont's explanation that he contributed $250,- 

000 to the Parker campaign fund because he felt responsible 
for that candidate's nomination, would indicate that his obliga- 
tion this year does not exceed $2.50. 

The local police department and the District Attorney's 

department, being at loggerheads over the question of raids on 
the gamblers' strongholds, is sufficient explanation of the rea- 
son why that evil is not suppressed. 

New York is exploiting Tammany as the champion hoo- 
doo in politics. When it comes to a contest in champions of 
that line, San Francisco might suggest a few local entries with 
Olympic records. 

The recently discovered Chinese note book giving details 

of police graft in that quarter seems to be a bolus that will kill 
the goose that has been laying eggs for so many years under 
star protection. 



The up-to-date student of politics may safely follow one 

rule in classifying his neighbors in the present political mix- 
up : If they don't agree with him they are unquestionably Pro- 
hibitionists, Socialists, Anarchists, or scabs. 

A "brainstorm" in a recent local trial was strong enough 

to procure the ladylike plaintiff a divorce. This demonstrates 
practically that Thaw is using the only kind of brain agitator 
guaranteed to keep a defendant in bonds. 

Los Angeles is considering the introduction of the 

Gothenburg system, which provides for an interval of fifteen 
minutes between drinks. Evidently Kentuckians are barred 
from the Board of Supervisors there. 

That $12,000,000 useless new Dreadnaught of Austria 

is a pre-ignited joke on the taxpayers. Usually the contractors 
guarantee the Dreadnaughts not to wreck themselves in the junk 
heap for three years. 

A woman suffragette, who had failed to obtain any ali- 
mony in the divorce court for seven months, frankly confessed 
to the judge that she is now in favor of the recall regarding 
husbands. 

The man who butted into a street dispute this week and 

was warned not to mix up with other people's troubles, had 
things all his own way when he smilingly announced that he was 
a lawyer. 

Great Britain is now threatened with a big strike in the 

shipyards, involving 500,00.0 men. Verily, the hook worm is 
about the only thing with a union card that rests in Merrie-less 
England. 

The winning of the Decathion at Stockholm by James 

Thorpe, the Carlisle Indian student, was a clear-cut American 
triumph. No other nation can make even an indirect claim to 
him. 

The London suffragette who threw a hatchet at Premier 

Asquith and hit a bystander with the missile, conclusively 
proved herself a woman and not an Amazon. 

Dare-devil flying is being roundly denounced by avia- 
tors in some sections of the country, but not where the birdmen 
fall for the cash prizes offered. 

A morning paper states that "the Third Party is upheld 

by Attorney-General Webb." There's a man ambitious to 
shoulder Atlas out of a job. 

The I. W. W. declare they are going to split the Western 

ration of Miners. Here's success to them, and a good job 
of it. 

Only modern Herods are opposing the pure milk laws in- 



-Where was Cannon when the last political gun was fired ? aujurated for the benefit of babies. 








Election bets are risky, and if you're wise you'll never wager 
so much as a hang nail on the results of a Republican conven- 
tion at Chicago. Over in Alameda are two worthy citizens. One 
is solid for Taft and keen to see him ride the grand old elephant 
home once more to the White House, while the other is strong 
for the Colonel, and feels that if Teddy can't steal a ride on the 
dingbusted elephant, why, a bull moose will answer the purpose 
just as well. 

Now at the opening of the Chicago convention, while things 
still looked pretty favorable for the Colonel, these two enthu- 
siasts met in wordy but amicable battle concerrAng the outcome 
of the convention struggle, with the result that the Colonel's 
man made a bet. Clapping his companion on the shoulder, he 
swore by the beard of his fifteenth grandfather to buy him and 
his wife a real French dinner should his hero lose the Republi- 
can nomination to Taft. In case he won, and there seemed no 
room for doubt in the bettor's mind, the Taft follower should 
foot the bill. 

The convention came and went as conventions have a way of 
doing, and in the course of time the Colonel's man received the 
following missive : 

"Dear Friend — The steam roller has put one over on you this 
time, so you had better be kicking that dinner around. Our hat 
is in the ring, and we expect you to 'come through,' as you will 
see by the enclosed clippings that Mr. Taft won a signal vic- 
tory at Chicago. You will also find enclosed a good restaurant 
directory and taxicab numbers. 

"Yours for a square deal (meal) at any time and place ap- 
pointed. — W. M." 

Now, it would seem that like master like man, for the best 
of the Colonel's men, like himself, seem to be remarkably poor 
losers. In a day or so the Taft man was astounded to receive 
a letter from his should-be host endeavoring to point out to the 
winner the fact that he was no winner at all, as Roosevelt's hat 
was still in the ring, and he had been elected presidential can- 
didate, to quote the writer, "by the'better half of the Republi- 
can party." After advising his would-be guest to poll his vote 
for Bryan or Debs, the Roosevelt man concluded : "Just think 
it over, and if you think you deserve the dinner, I am there; 
but we sure have a return dinner coming. Hoping this will 
find you well, we are as ever: Two Progressives, W. J. and 
wife." 

But that sort of stuff didn't go with W. M. and his wife, who 
are some progressive themselves, and the return letter was spir- 
ited; in fact, so spirited that W. J. decided to make the best of 
a bad matter, and so purchased the much-disputed dinner. 

While he still loves Teddy better than the wife of his bosom, 
they do say, over in Alameda, that he is as skittish as a two- 
year-old colt when two to one bets in favor of the Colonel are 
offered. 

15 S rs 

Out on Ocean avenue, in Ingleside, the extensive grading, 
cement, ballasting, etc., in combination with the oil macadam 
that isn't there, though so badly needed, create through the 
agency of the trade winds a condition of things in comparison 
with which a sirocco of the Sahara isn't a circumstance. For- 
tunately, here and there along the road are shelter stations, and 
one of these last week for a little while sheltered a brave soul. 

Most, if not all, of her worldly possessions were packed in a 
netted extension bag and a parcel, and they would have been a 
more than considerable load for a young person. She was "just 
resting a little," she said. "Past eighty, I am; but I can take 



care of myself and do lots of things. I could keep myself nicely 
if I had any place to go. We were burnt out when the big fire 
came, you know, and I've no children living now, but I'm on my 
way to my granddaughter. She'll help me; she'll tell me what 
to do. The folks I've been living with since the fire had to go 
away, and the young people that bought them out didn't keep a 
place where old people or little children could be allowed to 
stay, you know. Isn't it too bad ? My granddaughter, with her 
husband and children, is living in two rooms, while their new 
house is being built. She has means enough, but I don't know 
where she can put me. She don't know I'm coming. I hated to 
come. It's hard on old people when they haven't any place to 
go." Now we like to believe, all of us, that "shine and shadow 
are blent as the Blessed Master meant," but somehow there 
seems something wrong when brave people who have done their 
best for eighty years haven't any place to go. 
3 8 8- 

Have you registered ? Have you attended a registration tea ? 
The week past, no less than four have been given. On Friday, 
for the Twenty-eighth District, Mrs. Higbee entertained at 142 
Twenty-third avenue. On Monday, for the Thirty-first District, 
Mrs. Cotton received at the assembly hall on Fillmore near 
Jackson street; while for the Thirty-second District, Mrs. Good- 
man Loewenthal entertained at the Keystone apartments. For 
the Thirtieth District, Dr. Blanche Sanborn held a meeting at 
1715 Scott street on Tuesday. 

These ladies believe that the home women will make the best 
fight for the home, which they consider the main issue just now, 
and that securing their interest in some such way as this is the 
best way to overcome their diffidence in politics. If you want 
to see a fine, all-pull-together example of what women purpose 
in politics in this town you should go to a meeting of the New 
Era League. They are held usually in the Blue Room of the St. 
Francis of a Thursday morning. The latest estimate places the 
number of women registered at over thirty-eight thousand; 
that's already more than a third as many as Los Angeles — and 
prospects are on the boom. The registration teas, however, 
ought to be all the answer needed by the people who believed 
the franchise would make womenkind mannish. 

8 8 8 
An honest woman in politics — like the man following the 
same avocation — is in for a mighty lonesome time, but if she 
travels with her sense of humor in trim there's no limit to the 
fun she will have. One of them circulated an initiative peti- 
tion at a registration booth last week, and harvested joy whole- 
sale from the couples that came together to register. Some- 
times the wife, being asked her political affiliations, answered, 
"Whatever my husband's are," and again, the husband an- 
swered, "I leave it all to my wife. She has as good a head- 
piece as mine, and lots more time to read up on these things." 

The petition was for submission of the single-tax amendment. 
One man, when asked if he favored it, answered : "I'd not be 
likely to tell you whether I do or not, would I?" Maybe he 
was some like the fellow who just said right out: "I don't know 
a thing about it;" but there are any number of evasions. The 
star performer, though, was the one who answered : "Not much! 
Bachelors have a hard enough time as it is now !" and he hustled 
away before anybody could get a chance to explain. 
8 8 8 

This is just a dog story. You know of women here and there 
that befriend waifs and strays of every sort and condition—four 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



footed as well as the two-faced. One I know sneaks out of her 
comfortable home late every night with food for the alley cats 
that would be afraid to come for it until after curfew. Another 
seems fated to be followed by strays, and last week it was a 
spaniel, of the bluest blood. He was so evidently "quality 
folk" that after watching the lost and found columns for two 
or three days she advertised, giving her address, but no descrip- 
tion. Next morning a man who, she claims, could by no pos- 
sibility have belonged to such a refined dog, called and asked 
if she had a cur belonging to him, and she said "No, she hadn't." 
Before she had seen the last of him an auto stopped, and a gen- 
tleman asked if he might see the dog she advertised having 
found : that he had lost a valuable spaniel that answered to the 
name of "Duke." At that point, Duke joined in the discussion 
very convincingly. Then his master said: "I'd like to have you 
feel sure he is my dog, so I'll ask him, 'Duke, do you want to 
go for a ride?' " Whereupon Duke climbed into the machine 
and sat up. "How did you ever come to lose him?" asked 
Mrs. R. "Why, a baby came to stay at our house the night be- 
fore he got away. Maybe he felt neglected, and wanted to see 
the world. Maybe he was jealous; but I think he will be glad 
to get home again." And Duke said he would. 



All this talk about mighty hunters and lions and zebras and 
tigers brings to mind the fact that we have right here in our 
midst — or our near-midst, rather, as the gentleman hibernates 
at Carmel — a lion tamer who would knock the spots off of a 
leopard. 

Not every one, perhaps, has heard of the time when Grant 
Wallace made one of a gallant party of magazine writers and 
journalists who fared down to the ranch of one Buffalo Jones, 
on the edge of the Grand Canyon, in search of American-grown 
lions. Jones was a breeder of cattle, and in hopes of gaining 
a bit of advertising, sent out invitations to magazine writers and 
big game enthusiasts, advising them before going to Africa to 
try a hand at American lions, which were to be found in the 
vicinity of his ranch. Wallace was one of the mighty Nimrods 
summoned to the feast. 

A short time after his arrival he captured alive a half-grown 
lion, which he brought back to camp. It grew in time very tame, 
and soon became Wallace's boon companion. So attached had 
he become to the cub when time came for departure, that he 
decided to bring it along and dispose of it later to a first-class 
circus or a zoo, where he could be assured of its treatment. 
With this in view, he got as far as Salt Lake City, where he 
decided to remain for a few days. With his lion securely 
crated, he arrived at the fashionable Knutsford Hotel. While 
he went upstairs, his pet went below stairs to the basement. All 
went well until Wallace descended to pay his respects to the 
companion of his travels. 

Finding the cub rather cramped for room, Wallace let him out 
of his box, and together they raced back and forth through the 
big room in high glee. The animal, overjoyed with his freedom, 
gamboled up and down, and occasionally fawned upon his 
master. A passing bell boy paused in the open doorway, 
pinched himself, and then fled in terror. Soon the rumor, in the 



insidious way rumors have, got about that there was at that very 
moment in the basement of the hotel, a crazy man with a live 
lion, which at any time might waltz right upstairs and eat every 
one of them, provided, of course, that his "tunkey" was fash- 
ioned of India rubber. 

There followed an exodus which made the original Egyptian 
affair look like a moving furniture van. The cashier had to call 
for assistants, and where there was any delay in making change 
the guests didn't wait. There was no sign of hesitation any- 
where — simply a whole-souled desire to be on the move. In 
the midst of things it was suggested that some one parley with 
Wallace, but there came the rub. Wallace was still in the base- 
ment. Finally the operator remembered a telephone down there 
that hadn't been used since the days of King Herod. Wallace 
finally answered the 'phone, when the management informed 
him in honeyed tones of its admiration for himself and his 
writings, but would he please box up his lion and beat it? 



7 



Citizens' Alliance 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

OPEN SHOP 

More than fifty per cent of the Union 
membership is held in line by threats of 
physical violence. 

CITIZENS' ALLIANCE OFFICES 
Rooms 363-364-365 Rues Building 
Free'.Registralion Bureau and Employment Office 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

PHYSICIANS. 
Dr. W. P. Agnew has moved his office to this cfty, and Is now to be 
found In Room 424, Flood Building. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. All legal papers drawn up accurately. 
107 Montgomery street, near Sutter, San Francisco. 'Phone Itouglas 601 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Barnes tricycle chair. 1711 
tavi . Telephone i 'a i k V. 10 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m,; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St., now at room 403 
Weatbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW. 
Samuel L. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rlegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 
Bunions and In-growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 
206-206 W«« thank Building. 820 Market street, San Francisco. 

Your stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY 
Let us guide you in your selections 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importers of and Dealers in 
THE HIGHEST CLASS PAPER F ° R OFFICE STATIONERY 
Battery and Jackson Streets San Francisco. Cal. 



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A. OTTINGER, General Agent 

Ticket Offices, 722 Market, opp. Call. Tel. Sutter 2344 

8 East St., opp. Ferry Bid*., Tel. Sutter 2482. 
Berkeley Office: 2105 Sbattuck. Tel. Berkeley 331. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 



fflx, Mmifter «^ lomfa Mhw 



The entire press of the British Em- 
A Diplomatic Tangle, pire is vigorously backing England 
in her protest against the pending 
Panama Canal Bill to regulate tolls on the basis of free use of 
the canal for American owned ships. The press of Germany, 
France and the Latin-American republics are equally in sym- 
pathy with England's position. And to this array of news- 
papers defending the protest, several prominent Senators and 
Congressmen in the American Congress are quite outspoken in 
their defense of Great Britain's demands. On the other hand, 
the press of the United States, and an overwhelming majority 
of the people are vigorously supporting President Taft's posi- 
tion, which is that the Americans constructed the canal primar- 
ily for their own benefit, and have at least a moral right to grant 
concessions to other nations, but no nation has a moral or legal 
right to enter or use the canal on an equality with themselves. 
The canal zone is as much the territory of the United States as 
is any State in the Union, and is not subject to international 
law from any viewpoint. Nevertheless, the fact remains that 
the pending canal bill does contemplate favoritism for Ameri- 
can ships, and discrimination against the ships of every other 
maritime nation. The people of this country understand very 
well that not for a dozen or more years will the tolls provided 
for in the Bill to which England objects begin to pay the cost 
of the administration of the canal and canal zone, and the 
maintenance of the waterway. In short, the people of the 
United States will be obliged for several years to come 
to go down in their pockets for money to make good canal 
deficits. No nation has indicated its purpose to help make up 
the canal's losses, but all of them expect to share in all the 
benefits that will accrue to the owners and builders of the great 
convenience to the world's commerce, without sharing in the 
expense of the operation of the waterway. That is the position 
of every maritime nation. The position of President Taft and 
Congress is that the canal was constructed by the United 
States with the money of its citizens, which morally gives them 
the say what other peoples and upon what terms they may use 
the waterway. England's protest is equal to a demand for all 
the privileges that the United States has in the premises, 
without being held for accruing costs of maintenance. In 
that proposition lies the whole point of the controversy. Eng- 
land's claim is based on the wording of the Hay-Ponceforte 
treaty, as England interprets it, which is exactly the opposite 
of this government's interpretation. The fact that the press of 
Europe favors England may be taken as indicating a purpose 
of the Powers to force the question before the Hague Tribunal, 
where the United States would be at a great disadvantage. 

A few days ago the Italians tried to force the Darda- 
nelles with eight warships, but were driven back by the Turkish 
forts at a great loss of life and ships for the Italians. The plan 
of the invaders was to pass the Dardanelles and bombard Con- 
stantinople, but it was a humiliating failure. What Russia will 
now do remains to be seen. The Czar's purpose in coming to 
an "understanding" with Italy was to push the Italians into 
an effort to force the waterway, when Russia would step for- 
ward and take possession. For more than half a century Rus- 
sia has been scheming to get possession of the Dardanelles, and 
Italy was the last hope, but now that Italy has failed, it will 
be interesting to watch for the next move of the Bear. 

General Orozco, the Mexican revolutionary leader, gives 

it out that he has arranged with Japan for supplies of arms and 
ammunition which will be delivered to the rebels at a seaport 
in Southern California, but it is doubtful if the other nations 
will permit the transaction, for Mexico is at peace with the 
nations, and such an act on the part of Japan would be a gross 
violation of international law. In as much as Orozco and his 
rebel army are on the run, most likely there is no truth in his 
Japanese story. 

The Powers have notified the Cretans that a reorganiza- 
tion of the government will not be permitted. The Powers are 
not disposed to let the Cretans cut loose from Turkish au- 
thority. 



Although Tokio denies it, the belief is in all the capitals 

of Europe that Japan and Russia have actually signed a treaty 
of an offensive and defensive character, at least so far as their 
several interests in Manchuria and Mongolia are concerned. 
This is taken to mean that the Russians and the Japanese are 
in Mongolia and Manchuria to stay, and are ready to join hands 
in defending their assumed ownership of the two Chinese prov- 
inces. The treaty is a slap at the open door policy in the Far 
East for which the United States stands sponsor. 

A condition has been discovered in the upper Ama- 
zon region in Peru, which, for atrocities, goes far ahead of 
the worst that was ever revealed in the Kongo Free State, and 
like as in the Free State, the rubber trade is the cause of it. 
Trading in slaves flourishes; bloodshed, lust and the most dia- 
bolical treatment of the natives is reported. The Prussian 
government refuses to interfere, and objects to the introduction 
of more humane methods in dealing with the natives. 

The fate of Finland has made the people of Sweden ap- 
prehensive of the safety of their own country from Russia's ex- 
pansion policy, and to better secure their safety, all the Scan- 
dinavian States are ready to form a league with Germany for 
mutual protection against Russian schemes. 

An American has been appointed to direct the financial 

department of the new Chinese republic, which leaves the syn- 
dicate of six nations out in the cold, so far as its scheme to 
secure a mortgage on the whole country is concerned. 

Public meetings are being held all over England to 

discuss the "effect of the Panama Canal on the best interests of 
the empire." Naturally a toll canal finds no favor. 

Since the Spanish-American war, toward a quarter of a 

million wholly illiterate foreigners, mostly from Southern 
Europe, have settled in the United States. 

English suffragists are becoming so hostile to the gov- 
ernment that jails have but little terrors for them. 



p- "The World is Hers" -. 




The sense of freedom that comes from a knowledge of food values makes 
the housewife equal to any emergency in household management. She is 
ready for the uninvited guest — for the disappointments of uncertain 
domestic service. "The world is hers" if she knows 

Shredded Wheat 

and the many wholesome, nourishing dishes that can be made with it. 
Shredded Wheat is ready-cooked and ready-to-serve. Nothing so 
wholesome and nourishing and nothing so easy to prepare as Shredded 
Wheat Biscuit and with huckleberries or other fresh fruits. 

Heal one or more Biscuits in the oven (o restore crispness and then cover wiih huckle- 
berries or other berries. Serve wi(h milk or cream and sweeten to suit the taste. A 
delicious, appetizing dish for the sultry August dnys. 

For noon-day lunch nothing so delicious and nourishing as Trlscuit. the Shredded Wheat 
wofer. eaten with butler, soft cheese or marmalade. Take It with you to the camp or the 
bungalow, on picnics or excursions on land or sea. 

The Shredded Wheat Company, Niagara Fails, N. Y. 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



Lfcairy T@y® 



Airships in War. 



To get anywhere near the ideal in 
war it is necessary to go back to the 
primitive. Then, if two men evolved 
a mutual hatred of one another, they fought it out between 
themselves, and each shouldered the responsibilities of his own 
dislike and his own fighting. The more civilized we grow the 
farther we get from that ideal. The man who sends the chal- 
lenge and the man who take it up recede further and further 
from the battlefield, and suffer the results of their actions less 
and less. And the aeroplane, like every other invention that 
has been turned to martial use, intensifies this condition. It 
will make, according to Messrs. Grahame-White and Harper, of 
the battlefield a chessboard, at which the two commanders in 
chief will sit, using men and guns as their pieces. And so war, 
becoming more and more a thing of cold-blooded intelligence 
instead of hot-blooded brute force, will become more and more 
a thing satanic, malevolent, horrible. 

Up to the present, the work of the war aeroplane has been 
confined to scouting, but our authors think that it will soon prove 
its worth as an engine of destruction which, in large squadrons 
of weightlifting machines, will make organized onslaughts and 
rain down tons of missiles over any given spot. They also be- 
lieve that, with the inevitable improvements in weight carrying 
possibilities, it will soon become practicable to transport troops 
by aeroplane, especially for their quick movment in an emer- 
gency. And this is their prevision of the next conflict: "Prob- 
ably waged with light guns firing explosive shells, the next 
great war will begin, not on earth, but several thousand feet in 
the air." 

Prophecy, however, is allowed to fill but an extremely small 
part of the book's 250 pages. Nearly the whole of it is taken 
up with accounts and discussion of what has actually been done 
Brief as is the history of the aeroplane, that of the flying 
machine for purposes of war is far shorter. But the authors, 
after a chapter devoted to the dawn and progress of aviation, 
go into it with much detail, and recount very fully those first 
experiments in the French maneuvres of the autumn of 1910 
that set the civilized nations agog, and inspired everywhere the 
conviction that a revolution in military methods impended. 
Then follows a full review of the development of military avi- 
ation in every country in which it has been attempted. And the 
two authors take occasion every few pages to be openly and 
emphatically ashamed of England's backward position in this 
matter, and to point out earnestly and enthusiastically how 
necessary it is that she should join in this new martial move- 
ment, and bring her interest, equipment and experiment up to 
at least an even line with those of her national rivals. A chap- 
ter inserted while the book was going to press gives a summary 
of the British government's military aviation programme for 
1912-1913, which the authors find inadequate and disappoint- 
ing. There is discussion, also, of the training of army airmen, 
the cost of war aeroplanes, of wireless telegraphy and pho- 
tography as aids to aerial reconnoissance, of the development of 
all-weather war aeroplanes, of the problem of artillery fire 
and the aeroplane, of weight-carrying aeroplanes and their 
destructive potentialities, of the value of the aeroplane in naval 
warfare. On this last question the authors are enthusiastic, 
believing that, for coastal use and for use from the decks of 
ships at sea, fast-flying aeroplanes would be invaluable. 

Reviewing the use of the aeroplane by the Italians in their 
Tripoli campaign, Messrs. Grahame-White and Harper decide 
that it demonstrates "the value of the scouting aeroplane when 
used in difficult or inaccessible country." They think it is hardly 
to be doubted that the aeroplane "will entirely change mili- 
tary reconnoissance." 

With painstaking enthusiasm the two authors have brought 
together and discussed every item of the development of mili- 
tary aviation, and their book breathes their ardent belief that 
in order to save itself from early destruction every nation of the 
earth ought at once to set loose a cloud of flying fighters. 

"The Aeroplane in War." By Claude Grahame-White and 
Harry Harper. Illustrated. J. B. Lippincott Company. $3. 




Game 



Try It. 



Poultry 



No condiment can equal Lea & 
Perrins' Sauce for delicacy of 
flavor. It is tasty, appetizing, 
and a digestive 

LEA * PERRINS' 

SAUCE 

THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

It is a perfect relish for Soups, Fish, 
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John Duncan's Sons, Agents, N.Y. 




The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 



RESTAURANT 



WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 Home C 6705 



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HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC Ar>D ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 

415-421 Bush St., San Francisco (Above Kearny) Exchange. Douglas 2411 



Ladies Enjoy the Grill at 

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Special 50c Luncheon Served in Ladies' Grill 
as well as Main Dining Hall 



Phones 



Sutter 1572 
Home C 3970 
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Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rittman 
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RESTAURANT AND HOTEL NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner in the Cily with Wine. Ji.oo. Banquet Halls and Private 

Dining Rooms. Music Every Evening. 
362 Geary Street San Francisco 



Brushes 



Back to our old location, 623 Sacramento Street, between 
Kearny and Montgomery streets. 



Home-made Jams and Jellies, plain and fancy. 

taken. 931 Eddy St. "Phone Franklin 723. 



Orders 



witli full line of Brushes, Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand an 
to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets. Chamois. 
Metal Polish, and Cleaning Powders. Hardware. Wood and Willow Ware. 
I, write or telephone Kearny '■' 

WM. BUCHANAN. 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 




"What is a court of last resort, pa?" "Courting an old 

maid." — Judge. 

"Pa, what is political knavery?" "What the other side 

is doing, my son." — Birmingham Age-Herald. 

Townley — How's the new cook getting on? Suburbs — 

I don't know. She didn't leave her address. — Boston Tran- 
script. 

To the Editor — Why do the most worthless men often 

get the best ^vives? Answer — I don't know. Ask your hus- 
band. — Smart Set. 

"This portrait doesn't resemble me at all!" "Pardon me, 

madam, but I once made a portrait of a lady that resembled 
her." — Fliegende Blaetter. 

"Jores is extremely attentive to his wife." "Still very 

much in love with her, eh?" "Either that, or he is afraid of 
her." — Boston Transcript. 

"Papa, is it necessary to whip me?" "You ought to 

know." "Well, 1 sometimes think you don't realize how little 
good it does me" — Life. 

Griggs — I should say that the two keys to success are 

luck and pluck. Briggs— Sure! Luck in finding some one to 
pluck. — Boston Transcript. 

Chief Clerk (to office boy) — Why on earth don't you 

laugh when the boss tells a joke? Office Boy — I don't have 
to : I quit on Saturday. — Satire. 

Suitor — I hope my nomination to the curatorship of the 

museum of antiquities will induce you to trust your daughter to 
my care. — Meggendorfer Blaetter. 

Gabbleton — Edison declares that four hours' sleep per 

night is enough for any man. Kidder — By Jove! That is ex- 
actly what my baby thinks. — Judge. 

Economical Host — Alice, just play some popular song 

that our guests can all join in singing. They are doing nothing 
but eat and drink! — Fliegende Blaetter. 

"I've got a new attachment for the family piano," said 

Mr. Growcher; "and it's a wonderful improvement." "What is 
it?" "A lock and key." — Washington Star. 

Young Husband — What a glorious day! I could dare 

anything, face anything, on a day like this! Wife — Come on 
down to the milliner's. — Fliegende Blaetter. 

"How's your son getting on in college?" "Great. They 

put him in as a pinch hitter the other day and he cleared the 
bases with a three-bagger." — Detroit Free Press. 

"Isn't that fellow ever going to propose?" "I guess not; 

he's like an hour-glass." "How's that?" "The more time he 
gets the less sand he has." — St. Paul Pioneer Press. 

Gabe — Why do these Mexican rebels always have a bat- 
tle every Sunday afternoor ? Steve — They know how scarce 
news is on Monday morning. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 

Poet (raising his glass) — A glorious fluid! A whole 

poem is contained in it. Skeptical Friend — Then in heaven's 
name swallow it down quick. — Meggendorfer Blaetter. 

"Well, old sport, how do you feel ? I've just eaten a 

bowl of ox-tai! soup and feel bully." "I've just eaten a plate of 
hash and feel like everything." — New Orleans Times-Democrat. 

Mr. Grump (with newspaper) — Here's an odd case — a 

woman marries one man thinking he is another. Mrs. Grump — 
What's odd about that? Women are doing that all the time. — 
Boston Transcript. 



Ask your grocer or family liquor store for the Italian- 
Swiss Colony's TIPO, Riesling, Chablis or Sauterne. They are 
California's finest white wines. 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY IS A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER 

Removes Ton. Pimples, Freckles. Molh-PatcKes, 
Rash and Skin Diseases, and every blemish oo 
beauty, and defies detection, (t ha* Hood the (est 
of 64 yean; no other has, and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure i I is properly made. Accept no 
counterfeit of similar name. The distinguished Dr. 
L. A. Say re said 10 a lady of the baut- ton (a patieni): 
"Aa yos ladies will ate then, I recommend 'Goo* 
rand's Cream' ai the least harmfal of all the Skin 
preparations." . 

For sale by all Drugjristi and Fancy Goods Dealers. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET POWDER 

For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irnuriom. cures Sun- 
bom and lenders an excellent complexion. Price 25 Cents, by Mail. 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 

Removes Superfluous Hair. f Price $1.00. by mail 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 51 Great Jones St.. New York C.iy. 





Continuous Eye Rest 
and Eye Comfort 




Mr. Geo. Mayerle, San Francisco. 

Dear Sir — I wore the glasses you made for me 12 years continu- 
ously, which I consider something wonderful, and can heartily rec- 
ommend you to any one In need of glasses. Also the new pair you 
Just made suit me fin* 1 . Yours truly. 

M. A. MORGAN, 
417 South Gates St. Los Angeles, Cal. January 15, 1912. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Optician. 
Charter Member American Association of Opticians. 
960 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 
Mayerle's Eyewater, the Great Eye Tonic, freshens and 
strengthens the eye. Sent by mail on receipt of 65c. 

Mayerle's Antiseptic Eyeglass Wipers (a chemical cloth), 3 for 25c. 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone Douglas 2608 



THE LATEST STYLES IN 

Choice Woolens 



H. S. BRIDGE 

108-1 10 Softer Street 



CO., Merchant Tailora 
French Bank Bids. 



Ask your 
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Hose 

GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 
R. H. PRASE. President 589, 591. 593 Market Si. 




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NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP. 

Notice Ib hereby given that the partnership heretofore existing between 
I. H HILL and B. I. BILL, unrler the firm name of L. H. & B. 1 
doing business at No. 543 Golden Gate Avei tnclsco, California, 

tual consent, L. H. Bill retiring from said business. 
B. I. Bill will continue said business, and pas and colled all Indebtedness 
due by or to said firm. 

L. H. BILL. 
(Seal) B. I. BILL. 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



The Directors of the Kennett Consolidated Copper Companies offer the FIRST 
ALLOTMENT of 100,000 Shares, 7% Cumulative Preferred, Par value $3.00, 
each at $1.25 per share and 250,000 Shares Common Stock, Par value $3.00, 
at 75c per share. 

Kennett Consolidated Copper Companies 



Organized under the Laws of Arizona, July 5, 1911. 
and Non-Assessable. 

Capital Stock 



Fully paid 



$3,750,000.00 

1,250,000 shares, par value $3.00 each, divided into 350,000 

seven per cent Cumulative Preferred — Par Value, $3.00 each. 

900,000 Common Shares, Par Value $3.00 each. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

FRANK W. LEAVITT President 

(Twelve years Senator in the California Legislature.) 

WILLIAM K. KENT Vice-President and General Manager 

Attorney-at-Law, Mine Owner. 

EUGENE S. VAN COURT Secretary 

C. J. KENT Director E. M. KNOPH. . . .Director 

CONSULTING ENGINEER. 

EDWARD H. BENJAMIN, M. E., Many years President of the 

California Miners' Association. 

Properties Owned by the Kennett Consolidated Copper Companies 

1. Big Back Bone Group. 2. The Elsie Group. 3. Keystone 

These three groups of claims comprise 50 U. S. Mining loca- 
tions, 20, 18 and 12 respectively, approximating 1,000 acres, 
and are situated in the Back Bone Mining District of the Shasta 
County Copper Belt, in Sections 18, 19 and 20, Township 34 
North, Range 5 West, about six miles by wagon road from the 
railroad and smelter town of Kennett on the Southern Pacific 
Railroad, 18 miles north of Redding, the county seat. 

They lie on the same belt as the Mountain Copper Company's 
(Iron Mountain) properties, the Trinity, Balaklala. Shasta 
King and Mammoth), and are less than two miles from the 
workings of the Mammoth Mine, a property owned by the 
United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company of Bos- 
ton, a corporation capitalized at $75,000,000. 

SHASTA COUNTY COPPER. 

The Shasta County Copper Belt already ranks fifth in the 
Copper production of the United States, and is one of the few 
copper districts where copper can be profitably mined when the 
metal is selling at less than 12 cents per pound. 

Copper is the chief product and the basis of the mining pros- 
perity and prospects of Shasta County, which is far in the lead 
of the mineral producing counties of the State of California. 

From 1894 to 1910, this county has produced copper of a 
value of over Fifty Million Dollars ( $50,000,000.) 

Briefly summarized, the advantages of the Kennett Consoli- 
dated are: 

1. A porphyry copper — the kind that pays the biggest divi- 
dends. 

2. The properties cover an extensive mineralized area — nearly 
1,000 acres. 

3. Located in a copper belt ranking FIFTH IN PRODUC- 
TION in the United States. 

4. Adjacent to the greatest producing mine in California, a 
regular dividend payer. 

5. Surfaced and underground similarity to the other big mines 
of the district. 

6. Formation indicative of extensive ore bodies. 



7. Worked by tunnels, reducing working costs to a minimum. 
No expensive hoisting and pumping. 

8. Timber and water abundant. 

9. Smelters, power and railroads close at hand. 

10. Small capitalization for a big porphyry copper. 

11. First issues of stock at a very low price. 

12. Celebrated Engineer's report says : "The formation is 
identical with that of the MAMMOTH property, which it ad- 
joins, and when I first examined the MAMMOTH property in 
1896 there was no better showing at that time than there is now 
on the Big Back Bone property." 

This is the first great Porphyry Copper stock ever offered in 
the United States on such a small capitalization. 

For six years the properties have been developed by the 
owners on a business basis and with their own capital. They 
will continue to be so managed for the profit of all. 

They have now reached the stage where large capital is ab- 
solutely necessary to continue operations on a large scale and 
provide diamond drills, machinery, etc. 

It is assumed that the proceeds of this First Issue will furnish 
all the capital required, and make of the properties another 
"Mammoth" Mine. They have everything that the "Mammoth" 
had ten years ago. Expert Copper Engineers' reports say they 
are equally as good. Capital can make them just as valuable. 
At the present market price of copper (YlVi cents per pound) 
the "Mammoth" is yielding an annual profit of two million 
dollars. 

Just think of a profit of $2,000,000 on such a small capitaliza- 
tion as ours. 

Such are the possibilities of these properties. Copper will 
be a scarce metal in a few years. 

HERBERT C. HOOVER, IN HIS 'PRINCIPLES OF MIN- 
ING," PAGE 38, SAYS: 

"In copper the demand is growing prodigiously. If the 
growth of demand continues through the next thirty years in 
the ratio of the past three decades, the annual demand for 
copper will be over 3.000,00(1 tons. Where such a stupendous 
amount of this metal is to come tram is far beyond any appar- 
ent source of supply." 

Horace J. Stevens, the world's greates*. authority on copper, 
predicts that in from two to four years there will be the greatest 
boom in copper that the world has ever seen. 

No promoters are handling this stock. Usually such a copper 
stock would cost at least $5.00 a share if promoters were hand- 
ling it. 

And mark this innovation : We do not intend to maintain ele- 
gant and expensive offices, pay extravagant commissions to 
agents, or pay big men for the use of their names on our Board 
of Directors. These are the causes of failure of more than half 
of the corporations that go to the wall. 

We will send you free a booklet called "Porphyry Coppers," 
which more fully describes these properties, if you will send 
us your name and address. Don't wait a week or a month be- 
fore you write for it, because only a few people can be ac- 
commodated with shares, as some large blocks are already 
spoken for. 



Address all communications to 



Kennett Consolidated Copper Companies 



924 Page Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




PL/EASUR.DS WAND 



"We obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




THEATRE TIPS. 
COLUMBIA. — "The Grain of Dust" is presented with a fine 

cast, and is logical and timely. 
CORT. — "The Mikado," successfully presented by a cast of 

players known to the world. 
ALCAZAR. — Second week of "The Rose of the Rancho." 

Worth seeing again. 
PANTAGES. — Estelle Allison & Company in "The Question." 

Scenic effects and singing are fine. 
ORPHEUM. — "The Drums of Oude" the one great feature. 
EMPRESS. — Troupe of Arabs the stellar attraction. 



James K. Hackett at the Columbia Theatre. 

The greatest assemblage of players which has been brought 
to this city since the halcyon days when Henry Miller brought 
his wonderful summer companies to the old Columbia Theatre 
is the organization which Mr. Hackett has brought with him on 
the occasion of his six weeks' season at the Columbia Theatre. 
It might be stated that Mr. Hackett is following closely in the 
footsteps of Mr. Miller in more ways than one. The former is 
now his own manager, and can play whatever plays he wishes, 
and engage actors as he sees fit, and to the credit of Hackett it 
must be stated that he is in every way aiming for the very high- 
est standards in histrionic art. The play which Hackett is show- 
ing us this week is the one he did last season, and with which he 
achieved a large measure of success in the East. It is a drama- 
tization by Louis Evan Shipman of David Graham Phillip:;' 
novel, "The Grain of Dust." When I read the book I was not 
exactly crazy about it, as it proved a somewhat conventional 
story written rather cleverly, with not many dramatic incidents, 
which caused me to wonder what Shipman would be able to do 
with the story in order to adapt it successfully for the stage. As 
I thought, Shipman has taken unto himself the necessary 
license in order to shape the play for the stage. He has wrought 
some very fine climaxes, ana he sustains the interest very 
cleverly. Candidly, I do not think the play affords Hackett the 
proper opportunity. "Samson," a play he did for us when he 
was at the Alcazar, but some months ago, for a short season, 
was a play along somewhat similar lines, and which possessed 
real cumulative interest which "The Grain of Dust" does not. 
The latter is, however, a play of deep interest, and is well worth 
while. 

The adapter has done all that was possible, and the story is 
logical and timely, and has to do with present day money kings 
and frenzied finance, and follows largely along the lines of the 
book, which only a short time ago was rated as a "best seller;" 
hence, I take it, has been generally read by the majority of the 
theatre going public. An altogether wonderful acting company 
extracts all the good from the play there is in it, and the players 
concerned in this particular play do not by any means comprise 
the entire company which Hackett has brought us. When 
Hackett was at the Alcazar, he confided to me that he had plans 
and hopes in mind, of which the present season at the Columbia 
is the consummation. He formally announces that during his 
present stay with us he is to do new plays by Booth Tarking- 
ton, Brandon Tynan, Ferdinand Gottschalk and Edwin Milton 
Royle, which does, indeed, look like a royal treat for this city 
— which literally starves for anything in the way of theatrical 
novelty. There was a time, and not so very long ago, when 
San Francisco was iooked upon as somewhat of a theatrical 
producing center, but it must be truthfully admitted that within 
the past few years Los Angeles has wrested this honor away 
from us. Hackett will do a great deal to bring us into promi- 
nence again in this respect, and, furthermore, it must be known 
that Hackett is risking a great deal in this local venture, and 
should therefore have the staunch and loyal support of every ar- 
dent theatre goer of this city. I have had occasion to state be- 
fore tnat I consider Hackett as one of the very greatest actors 
on our American stage, a man with a tremendous future, who 
has all his big things before him, a man equipped physically 
and mentally to do much in his profession, and with him, as 



with many of our best actors, much of his future success will 
rest on one thing, something Shakespeare mentioned when he 
said, "The play's the thing." His season shows clearly that he 
is doing his utmost to find the proper vehicle which will give 
him the opportunity which he so strenuously seeks. I am sure 
we all wish him the greatest possible success in his meritorious 
and worthy undertaking. 

Of special mention among the players in "The Grain of 
Dust" is E. M. Holland, one of our very finest actors, long an 
ornament to his profession. The last time we saw him in this 
city was when he gave his great performance of Captain Bed- 
ford in "Raffles," when he was the principal support of the late 
Kyrle Bellew. Holland is an actor who has had a long and an 
honorable career, who should by all rights and traditions have 
been a star for many years, but the peculiar hand of fate ruled 
otherwise, though it might be stated that Holland some years 
ago did try his hand at being a star, but again it was a case of 
not having the proper play. Monday evening Hackett was called 
upon for a speech, and after a few brief words of thanks, he 
made an affectionate allusion to Holland, and brought him out 
to speak for himself. This act of graciousness was duly ap- 
preciated by the audience, and goes to show the real calibre of 
Hackett as an actor and a man. Holland in turn made a grate- 
ful reference to Hackett, and of course applause was the order 
of the day for the time being. Holland has a role in which he 
can exhibit all his well known cleverness. He creates a dis- 
tinctive type, which he simply characterizes with all the skill 
and art at his command, and this means a performance which 
well nigh shares honors with the star. 

The roster of the players enacting "The Grain of Dust" con- 
tains many well known names, prominent among whom should 
be mentioned Frazer Coulter, Frank Burbeck, Vaughan Trevor, 
Olive Oliver, Beatrice Beckley, and several others. Each in- 
dividually gave a sterling performance, which meant a wealth 
of fine acting, and much space could be used in descanting upon 
the respective ability of each actor. A performance of which I 
want to give special mention, and a name I did not record, is 
that of Fred Sullivan, who gave a repressive enactment of the 
faithful butler which was a gem. Mr. Hackett has staged the 
play in a very thorough manner, and nothing has been left un- 




Mrs. Louis James, who will appear in the triangular comedy, 
'Holding a Husband," this Sunday matinee at the Orpheum. 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



done to make the performance of "The Grain of Dust" an even- 
ing of unalloyed enjoyment. Mr. Hackett is making a noble 
effort to give us a real treat, and in doing so he has summoned 
all the power at his command. Let us, then, by actual partici- 
pation, show our deep appreciation of his efforts, and lend our 
applause and encouragement. 

* * * 

"The Mikado" at the Cort. 

Dear, delightful memories of a quarter of a century ago are 
being brought back again in listening to the tinkling music of 
Sir Arthur Sullivan and the crisp and catchy libretto of Sir W. 
S. Gilbert. What a treat this Gilbert and Sullivan festival is go- 
ing to be for us all, and for the younger generation especially, 
who have been gorged for several years by the new form of 
musical comedy, which has been good and bad and indifferent 
in turn. We owe a debt of gratitude to the Messrs. Shubert and 
William A. Brady for their enterprise in bringing out again 
these comic operas which have been on the shelf for many 
years, and which have been massacred and mutilated beyond 
recognition for years by all kinds of aspiring musical students 
and amateurs of all kinds. A couple of years ago a manager 
on the lookout for novelty in the big metropolis on the other 
coast brought out a revival of one of the old dramas which, 
contrary to expectations, was a huge success. His example was 
followed by other managers, who delved into the archives of 
long-forgotten plays and produced them with the best acting 
companies which could be gathered together. All these re- 
vivals were, on the whole, successful, and then some astute 
manager conceived the idea, that the former musical successes 
could also be revived with equal success, the upshot being the 
Gilbert and Sullivan season at the Casino in New York, which 
proved a success far beyond expectations. 

The entire New York organization has been 
brought out here intact, and is as fine a singing and 
acting company as we have seen out here for many 
years for this form of entertainment. With the great 
acting company at present at the Columbia, we cer- 
tainly should be happy, as from a theatrical stand- 
point we have all we can wish for. If memory serves, 
"The Mikado" first saw the light of day some 
twenty-six or twenty-seven years ago, at a time when 
Japan was not the country it is now. In those days 
modern musical comedy was not the vogue which it 
is now. Really, it gave one the sense of complete 
satisfaction to see the gray heads and wrinkled faces 
laughing at the old jokes again which they heard 
more than a score of years ago, and to see them 
lean forward in their seats and listen with delight 
gleaming in their faces at the old, familiar melodies 
which have done yeoman service for so long. Verily, 
I came to the conclusion that the modern school of 
music could not teach the old timers anything; in 
fact, I think that the shoe is on the other foot, and 
that the younger generation of composers can learn 
something of the beauties of musical rhythm and 
genuine expression in music from these same old- 
timers. I was genuinely pleased to see that the local 
season of this all too brief musical festival promises 
to be an immense success, which is as it should be. 
If we could not appreciate this sort of thing, then 
we are indeed decadent. I presume that we will 
all decide that De Wolf Hopper is due for first men- 
tion when the company is being reviewed. As Ko- 
Ko he has ample opportunity for all his wealth of 
natural humor. 

Anybody seeing the opera for the first time I am 
certain would come to the conclusion that the role 
was especially written for the elongated comedian. 
He really does fairly revel in the many fun making 
opportunities the role affords him. He is indeed the 
central figure every moment he is on the stage. His 
"Titwillow" song has never been sung with more 
unction. Naturally, as is the custom in any play in 
which Hopper appears, he is supposed to give a 
speech, which is still rendered in the same inimitable 
way we have heard so often. George MacFarlane is 
the Mikado. I am sure that this gentleman ap- De Wol 

peared at the Savoy Theatre a couple of years ago "Pinafori 



in a musical affair which I believe was entitled "The Beauty 
Spot." I clearly recollect making reference at that time to the 
splendid voice which the young man possesses. It is a bari- 
tone of unusually fine quality, vibrant and true, and of much 
power, and MacFarlane is a splendid actor besides. The tenor 
is Arthur Aldridge, a clever young man with a sweet, clear 
voice which he uses discreetly. His "Wandering Minstrel" 
number was encored several times. Eugene Cowles, the best 
basso we have in this country outside of grand opera, is the 
Pooh-Bah. He is the same Cowles we have known of old, 
and still retains that glorious voice we have most of us heard 
so often. Arthur Cunningham, he of the former Tivoli, is the 
Pish-Tush. He is being welcomed back among us royally. His 
voice is as good as ever, and we all know what that means. 
Blanche Duffield is the Yum- Yum. She is a comely young lady 
with a clear soprano which she uses with much judgment. It i\ 
not a big voice, but of splendid timbre. She is a capable ac- 
tress, too. Kate Condon, who was also one of us out here for 
some time, is the Katisha. She, too, was given cordial greet- 
ing. Miss Condon still retains all her cleverness, and besides, 
her voice is still to be reckoned with. All her numbers were 
repeatedly encored. Alice Brady, a daughter of the producer, 
made a capital Pitti-Sing. She is pretty and vivacious, and 
has a voice which, while not large, is pleasing and musical. 
Louise Barthel is clever as Peep-Bo, and does all that is re- 
quired in a consistent manner. There is a splendid singing 
chorus of about fifty, who know their business and attend 
strictly to it. The costuming is in good taste, and the two 
scenes are very good. Frank Paret is the musical director. He 
will be remembered here for the capable work he did in the 
same capacity for Kolb and Dill. 




r Hopper, the noted comedian-singer, who plays DickDeadeye in 
at the Cort. 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 



Splendid Melodrama at the Orpheum. 

"The Drums of Oude," a one-act drama produced and pre- 
sented by David Belasco at the Orpheum is splendid. When 
David Belasco trains his stage genius upon the little brother 
of the legitimate, calls to his aid players rich in power and un- 
derstanding, imports his properties from India, and gives us a 
drama like "The Drums of Oude," which leaves the auditor in 
a quiver and sends him forth awed and spellbound, then this 
1912 kind of vaudeville must be reckoned with seriously. Vau- 
deville has never known so perfect, so artistic, so faithful and 
so compelling an act. The daring of the expert makes it strik- 
ing in its departure. The scene of the drama takes place in the 
tower of an ancient palace in India, where a few British soldiers 
with their women folk are preparing for the coming of the 
Sepoys. As was the case all over India during this terrible 
period of British history, the Sepoys have taken advantage of 
the absence of the regiment usually stationed at the garrison, 
and unless it returns in time, there is but one thing left for the 
besieged soldiers to do, and that is to blow up the powder maga- 
zine beneath their feet, and thus save the women from the 
unspeakable — a fate which will be theirs if they fall into the 
hands of the fanatical and barbarous Hindustani. The story is 
weirdly thrilling, and every moment is tense with dramatic sus- 
pense, and when the climax comes with one of the most im- 
pressive battle scenes ever created by the masterly combination 
of artistically used stage effects and the power of suggestion, 
an appeal is made to the enthusiasm of the audience that it finds 
it impossible to resist. 

Stein, Hume and Thomas sing respectively tenor, baritone 
and bass. They are also clever comedians, and their travesty 

on "II Trovatore" furnishes a laughable finale to their act. 

* * * 

Estelle Allison at the Pantages. 

Mirth, melody and good entertainment generally reign 
supreme at the Pantages Theatre this week, crowded houses be- 
ing in continual evidence, and the program including such nov- 
elties as the seven "Aviator Girls," with dainty Carlie Lowe, 
in their four scene musical extravaganza; Max Witt's Four Har- 
monious Girls, who sing, dance and play a bit; Estelle Allison 
and her excellent support in her own musical playlet, "The 
Question." Mrs. Allison is a prominent society woman of San 
Francisco, and is to be congratulated upon her success. The 
sketch is a prominent feature of the program, and is a skit which 
displays her histrionic ability, together with a wardrobe beside 
which the usual vaudeville star's apparel suffers considerably 
by comparison. The scenic effects and the singing of Mrs. 
Allison, and her supporting company of young men, are good. 
The act was written by the star, and the scenic arrangements 
designed by her husband. 

William Morrow, Donna Harries and their midget "Cupid," 
presenting an original conceit, "Happy's Millions;" Si Jenks, 
the quaint Yankee humorist and philosopher, and other clever 

entertainers, are entitled to favorable mention. 

* * » 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



Pantages. — An unusually bright array of attractions has been 
secured for the week commencing Sunday afternoon, Fred Ire- 
land and his dancing Casino Girls heading the bill. Wood's Ani- 
mal Actors, comprising several dogs that do almost everything 
but talk, and four monkeys that play "The Suwanee River" on 
chimes, will enliven proceedings, and El Barto, styled the "con- 
versational trickster," will deliver an original monologue as he 
mystifies his audience with extraordinary feats of prestidigita- 
tion. A special engagement of great interest to local lovers of 
clean, manly sport, is that of Willie Ritchie, the popular light- 
weight who is looking for championship honors that seem to be 
easily within his reach. He will offer a little skit, "Fun in a 
Gymnasium," in which he will punch the bag, skip the rope, 
and do all sorts of training stunts, in addition to sparring three 
rounds with his boxing partner. The Four Flying Valentinos, 
aerial athletes, will furnish a startling exhibition, and Ed. Dale 
and Edith Pfeil, comedy singers and talkers, will have no end 
of snappy songs and small talk, will furnish much food for 
laughter. Howsley and Nichols, novelty comedy musicians, 
who play well upon a variety of instruments, and Sunlight Pic- 
tures, showing many pictorial surprises, will complete a varied 
and entertaining program. 

» * * 

Orpheum. — The very highest standard of vaudeville is cer- 
tainly attained in the bill announced for next week at the Or- 
pheum. Marguerite Haney will appear in B. A. Rolfe's tabloid 
musical comedy, "The Leading Lady." Miss Haney has only 
just returned from Paris, where she created a decided hit in the 
review at the Folies Bergere. 

Mrs. Louis James, widow of Louis James, will make her 
vaudeville debut in this city in a triangular comedy by Arthur 
Hopkins, entitled "Holding a Husband," in which she will have 
the support of Laurette Brown and Elwood Bostock. Mrs. 
James has the distinction of being the youngest actress to por- 
tray the role of Queen Katherine in "Henry VIII." 

The Empire Comedy Four, which also comes, has a splendid 
record. 

Pauline Moran, one of the best singing comediennes in vaude- 
ville, will introduce herself and her clever and amusing enter- 
tainment. 

Next week will be the last of Lew Sully, the Four Flori- 

monds and Mademoiselle Sealby and Monsieur Duclos. It will 

also conclude the engagement of David Belasco's absolutely 

perfect production of "The Drums of Oude," which is proving a 

thrilling sensation. 

* * * 

Columbia. — The second and final week of "The Grain of 
Dust" commences Monday night, July 29th. There will be a 
bargain matinee Wednesday, in addition to the regular Saturday 
matinee. For the third week of the Hackett season there will 
be staged, for the first time anywhere a new play from the pen 
of Brandon Tynan, the actor-author. It is called "The Melody 
of Youth," and is in three acts with a story cf Irish interest. 



Alcazar. — Having succeeded in obtaining an extension of 
Bessie Barriscale's stay at the Alcazar, the management has 
acceded to popular request by deciding to present her in "My 
Wife," next Monday evening and throughout the week. When _ __ 

she last appeared here in this play, about two years ago, her CjOft 1 fl6dtV6 
grip on the favoritism of the Alcazar's clientele was immeasur- 
ably strengthened, for she had a role that brought out all the 
charm of her dainty personality, and enabled her to reveal new 
and charming phases of her art. Hence the demand for its re- 
vival. 



"What is the first step toward remedying the discontent 

of the masses?" "The fiist step," replied the energetic cam- 
paigner, "is to get out and make speeches to prove to them how 
discontented they are." — Washington Star. 



Cort. — The Gilbert & Sullivan Festival Co., now represent- 
ing a season of revivals of those famous authors at the Cort 
Theatre, "The Mikado" having proved a wonderful success dur- 
ing the past week, change their bill on Sunday evening, and will 
present for the entire week, beginning that day, another opera, 
perhaps one of the most popular of the even dozen which they 
gave to the world, in "H. M. S. Pinafore." 

For the third week of comic opera at the Cort Theatre, it has 
been arranged that "Patience" will be given production the first 
half of the week of August 4th, and to follow it with the pre- 
sentation of "The Pirates of Penzance" for the final half of that 
same week. 



Leading attractions only. 

Ellis and Market streets. 

Phone — Sutter 2460. 
Last time to-night— THE MIKADO. 

Beginning i vv (Sunday) night, second big week of THE 

GILBERT & SULLIVAN FESTIVAL CO.. De Wolf Hopper. Blanche 
Duffleld. Kate Condon. Viola Gillette, Alice Brady, George Mac- 
Farlane, Arthur Aldridge. Arthur Cunningham. Louise Barthel, 
Eugene Cowles. in 

"H. M. S. PINAFORE." 
Nights and Saturday matinee prices — 50c. to $2. Popular matinees 
Wednesdays. 

Seats now selling for week commencing Sunday. Aug. 4th. Sun- 
day, Monday, Tuesday. Wednesday matinee and night, "Patience." 
Thursday. Friday. Saturday matinee and night. Sunday. "The 
Pirates of Penzance." Week commencing Monday, August 12tfa 
To be annou I, 

Alcazar Theatre s^a-M.™. 

Belasco St Mayer, Owners and Managers. 

Monday evening. July 29th, and throughout the week. BESSH-: 
BARRISCALE. assisted by FORREST STANLEY ihis first app 
ance In San Francisco), and the Alcazar Company in 



MY WIFE, 



Michel Morton's delicious comedy. 
Prices— Night. 25c. to II; matinee, 
Saturday, Sunday. 



!5c. to 50c. Matinee Thursday, 



JuLY 27 ' 1912 - and California Advertiser 

A CfiMornakia Afeir@<si<al=°°A Mofevdl tafiMic© 

By Mark Twain. 
In October Overland Monthly, 1868. 



15 



We voyaged by steamer down the Lago di Lecco, through 
wild mountain scenery, and by hamlets and villas, and disem- 
barked at the town of Lecco. They said it was two hours by 
carriage to the ancient city of Bergamo, and that we would 
arrive there in good season for the railway train. We got an 
open barouche, and a wild, boisterous driver, and set out. It 
was delightful. We had a fast team, and a perfectly smooth 
road. There were towering cliffs on our left, and the pretty 
Lago di Lecco on our right, and every now and then it rained 
on us. Just before starting, the driver picked up in the street 
a stump of a cigar an inch long, and put it in his mouth. When 
he had carried it thus for about an hour, I thought it would be 
only Christian charity to give him a light. I handed him my 
cigar, which I had just lit, and he put it in his mouth and re- 
turned his stump to his pocket! 

We saw interior Italy now. The houses were of solid stone, 
and not often in good repair. The peasants and their children 
were idle as a general thing, and the donkeys and chickens 
made themselves at home in drawing-room and bed-chamber, 
and were not molested. The drivers of each and every one of 
the slow-moving market carts we met were stretched in the sun 
upon their merchandise, sound asleep. Every three or four 
hundred yards, it seemed to me, we came upon the shrine of 
some saint or other — a rude picture of him built into a cross 
or a stone pillar by the road-side. Some of the pictures of the 
Savior were curiosities in their way. They represented him 
stretched upon the cross, his countenance distorted with agony. 
From the wounds of the crown of thorns; from the pierced 
side; from the mutilated hands and feet; from the scourged 
body ; from every hand-breadth of his person, streams of blood 
were flowing! Such a gory, ghastly spectacle would frighten 
the children out of their senses, I should think. There were 
some unique auxiliaries to the painting, which added to its 
spirited effect. 

These were genuine wooden and iron implements, and were 
prominently disposed around about the figure a bundle of nails; 
the hammer to drive them ; the sponge ; the reed that supported 
it; the cup of vinegar; the ladder for the ascent of the cross; 
the spear that pierced the Savior's side. The crown of thorns 
was made of real thorns, and was nailed to the sacred head. 
In some Italian church paintings, even by the old masters, the 
Savior and the Virgin wear silver or gilded crowns that are 
fastened to the pictured heads with nails. The effect is as 
grotesque as it is incongruous. 

Here and there, on the fronts of roadside inns, we found 
huge, coarse frescoes of suffering martyrs like those in the 
shrines. It could not have diminished their sufferings any 
to be so uncouthly represented. We were in the heart and 
home of priestcraft — of a happy, cheerful, contented ignorance, 
superstition, degradation, poverty, indolence, and everlasting 
unaspiring worthlessness. And we said fervently, it suits these 
people precisely; let them enjoy it, along with the other ani- 
mals, and Heaven forbid that they be molested. We feel no 
malice toward them. 

We passed through the strangest, funniest, undreamt-of old 
towns, wedded to the customs and steeped in the sleep of the 
elder ages, and perfectly unaware that the world turns round! 
And perfectly indifferent, too, as to whether it turns round or 
stands still. They have nothing to do but eat and sleep, and 
sleep and eat, and toil a little when they can get a friend to 
stand by and keep them awake. They are not paid for think- 
ing — they are not paid to fret about the world's concerns. They 
were not respectable people — they were not worthy people — 
they were not learned and wise and brilliant people — but in 
their breasts, all their stupid lives long, rested a peace that 
passeth all understanding! How can men, calling themselves 
men, consent to be so degraded and happy ? 

We whisked by many a gray old medieval castle, clad thick 
with ivy that swung its green banners down from towers and 
turrets where once some old Crusader's flag had floated. The 
driver pointed to one of these ancient fortresses and said (I 
h-anslate) : 



"Do you see that great iron hook that projects from the wall 
just under the highest window in the ruined tower?" 

We said we could not see it at such a distance, but had no 
doubt it was there. 

"Well," he said, "there is a legend connected with that iron 
hook. Nearly seven hundred years ago that castle was the 
property of the noble Count Luigi Gennaro Guido Alphonse di 
Genova " 

"What was his other name?" said one of the party. 

"He had no other name. The name I have spoken was all 
the name he had. He was the son of " 

"Never mind the particulars. Go on with the legend." 

"Well, then, all the world at that time was in a wild excite- 
ment about the Holy Sepulchre. All the great feudal lords 
in Europe were pledging their lands and pawning their plate 
to fit out men-at-arms so that they might join the grand armies 
of Christendom, and win renown in the Holy Wars. The 
Count Luigi raised money, like the rest; and one mild Septem- 
ber morning, armed with battleaxe, with barbican, cresset, 
portcullis, Enfield rifle, Prussian needle gun and thundering 
culverin, he rode through the greaves of his donjon-keep with 
as gallant a troop of Christian bandits as ever stepped in Italy. 
He had his sword, Excalibur, with him. His beautiful coun- 
tess and her young daughter waved him a tearful adieu from 
the battering-rams and buttresses of the fortress, and he gal- 
loped away with a happy heart. 

He made a raid on the neighboring baron and completed his 
outfit with the booty secured. He then razed the castle to the 
ground, massacred the family, and moved on. They were 
hardy fellows in the grand old days of chivalry. Alas! those 
days will never come again. 

Count Luigi grew high in fame in the Holy Land. He 
plunged into the carnage of a hundred battles, but his good 
Excalibur always brought him out alive, albeit often sorely 
wounded. His face became browned by exposure to the Syrian 
sun in long marches; he suffered hunger and thirst; he pined 
in prisons, he languished in loathsome plague-hospitals. And 
many and many a time he thought of his loved ones at home, 
and wondered if all was well with them. But his heart said — 
Peace, is not thy brother watching over thy household? 

Forty-two years waxed and waned; the good fight was won; 

(Continued to Page 23.) 



Orph 



01J,W, O' Fan-ell Street. 

c/M/f iv Brt stockton an(J Powell. 

Safest and most magnificent theatre In America. 

Week beginning tbh inds afternoon. M- ie even flay. 

THE HIGHEST STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE. 

MARGUERITE HANEY In B. A. Rolfe's Tabloid Musical Comedy, 
'•The Leading Lady." with Ralph Lynn: MRS. LOUIS JAMES In the 
triangul "Holding a Husband:" EMPIRE COMEDY 

POOR; PAULINE MORAN, Singing : LEW SULLY: 

POUR FLORIMONDS; SEALS! IS; NEW I'AYi. 

MOTION PICTURES. Last weell DAVID liELASCO'S PRODUC- 

, "THE DR1 il DE." 

Evening Matinee prices 

(except Sundays and holidays), LOc, i'hones Dou^: 

Home C 1670. 



Pantages' Theatre 



Market street, opposite Mason. 



Week of Sunday, July 2Sth. 

HERE'S A BIG SHOW! 
Frederick Ireland and bis CASINO GIRLS, assisted by 

MISS NEMA CATTO; WOOD'S ANIMAL ACTORS: EL BARTO. 

the Conversational Trickster: HOWSLEY and NICHOLS, novelty 
Comedv Musicians; FOUR FLYING VALENTINOS, Sensational 
Aerialists: ED. PALE and EDITH PFEIL. Comedy Singers and 
Talkers: SUNLIGHT PICTURES and 

WILLIE RITCHIE in "Fun In a Gymnasium." 
Mat. dally at 3:30. Nights at 7:ln and 9.15. Sunday and Holiday 
Mats, at 1:30 and 3:30; nights continuous from 6:30. Prices — 10c, 
20c. and 30c. 



Columbia Theatre 



Corner Geary and Mason Its. 
Phones Franklin 110. 
Horn* C KM. 



Gottlob. Man * Co.. Managers. 
Beginning Monday. July 20th. t- if JAMES K. HACKETT 

and his famous New fork players in the dramatization 

of David Graham Phillips' novel. 

THE GRAIN OF DUST. 
Evenings and Saturday matinee. $1.50 to 25c. Bargain matinee 
Wednesd ■.. 51. 

Mondav, August 5th — Brandon Tynan's new play. "THE MELODY 
OF YOUTH." 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 





OTEiTX 



^<\ 



Were you one of the fortunate ones who witnessed the mar- 
riage ceremony that united Jennie Crocker and Malcolm Whit- 
man, and did you sit down to the wedding breakfast served in 
that pavilion of wondrous beauty? 

If you did not, you read all about it. 'Fess up, now, you did 
read some of it. Of course, we all pretend that we care nothing 
about the affairs of people we do not know, but in every com- 
munity there is one or more persons who somehow take hold of 
the imagination, fasten themselves upon the interest of every 
one. They apparently make no effort to achieve this place, but 
by force of personality, position, heritage or what not they be- 
come of general interest, and their destiny is of paramount in- 
terest to people who do not even know them by sight. 

Jennie Crocker is being credited with being the richest heiress 
in California. Statisticians will affirm that that is not true. 
Even if she were, that fact alone would not account for the 
number of star-gazers who crane their necks every time the 
star of her destiny hitches another notch in its orbit. A girl has 
to have something more than money to make her path across the 
Milky Way the course around which the lesser luminaries twin- 
kle. Even the combination of so much money and so many 
prize dogs wouldn't account for the interest Jennie Crocker has 
always aroused. To be sure, she has a romantic background— 
a grandfather who has enough iron in his soul to help lay the 
rails of the Central Pacific and so enable his descendants to 
go silk-hatted and satin-shod through life. But there are other 
young women who share this background — in fact, who are lost 
among its shadows, whereas Jennie Crocker stands out by force 
of her personality and talent for doing things that arrest the 
attention of the world as it spins by, bent on its own business. 

So we might as well be honest and say that whether or no we 
enjoy a howdy-do-ness with the principal figures in the wedding, 
we know all about the event. Which brings us to the crux of 
the matter — which isn't really a crux because no pheasant who 
was not a snob would feel at home on a crux. 

If you read the menu of that wedding breakfast you prob- 
ably said: "Huh! it doesn't sound like the kind of square meal 
where one gets hurt on the corners!" You bethought yourselves 
of the wedding feasts of ancient times, when the groaning board 
was freighted with roasted animals, and fowl turned on the spit 
and great tankards of spicy brew, and all the chinks between 
filled in with pigeon pies and blood puddings, and Lucullus 
knows what else! There were days within the memory of the 
men who saw a dozen miners and hardware men meet and have 
a vision of a railroad that should button the West to the East, 
when a wedding feast was a food fest. But the day of gorging 
is not with us. There was a time when it was not considered re- 
fined to go to college. To-day it is not considered unrefined 
to feed the mind, but the appetite must be disciplined. The 
well-bred host does not freight his table with all the fancy and 
high-priced food stuff in the market. It is not good form. 

But somehow one expected that Jennie Crocker's wedding 
breakfast would make the imagination of a gourmet vibrate with 
appreciation. Yet the average person reading it was not im- 
pressed with the six courses set forth in print. Ah, that is be- 
cause the average person does not know what trouble pheasants 
spell on a menu. 

A law was recently passed allowing the sale of domestically 
raised Mongolian pheasants. Heretofore it has been impossible 
to buy them in the open market. The order for the wedding 
breakfast was placed with the St. Francis Hotel. The man who 
made up the menu knew that he would have to go in for quality, 
not for quantity, in order to make the feast a memorable one. 
The result could not be obtained by piling course upon course, 
but there must be some original dish, some delicacy which 
would differentiate this collation from all others of the year. 
Frogs' legs, however shapely, are now commonplace, and while 
they are still good form on a menu, they do not put the in- 
durated dinner goers into the ecstatic "urn!" state of mind. 



PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street in the center of the city. 
Take any Market Street Car from the Ferry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The most beautifully situated of any City Hotel 
in the world. 

Take the Sacramento Street Cars from the Ferry 
Two Great Hotels Under the Management of the 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



There was once a dinner with frogs' legs that was highly 
appreciated. But that was because Colonel Kirkpatrick de- 
cided that there must be frogs' legs, and there were none in the 
market, so he went over to Stege himself, and with a couple of 
bon vivant club mates set out to capture some of the frogs on 
the private pond which furnished the Palace in the days before 
the fire, with its most succulent poulettes of frogs. There may 
be some people who have to cultivate a taste for frogs' legs. 
Without doubt or qualification all people have to cultivate a 
talent for catching them ! Ask the clubmen who tried it, if you 
don't believe it! Given a nice green, slimy pond full of big, 
imported frogs, a good row boat and all the implements of cap- 
ture, it may sound easy to transport the frogs from the pond to 
the fire, but only the finished performer who practices at sun- 
down and sun-up, can achieve. 

Frogs' legs make a very good course, but they have become 
a matter of course. So the man who makes up the menus sat 
him down and groped about for an inspiration, and across the 
foreground of his fancy stalked a pheasant. Confucius be 
praised, if there were enough Mongolian pheasants in the 
country to feed three hundred people. He began to take the 
census of said pheasants, and discovered that they were pro- 
curable. 

Then he consulted a lawyer to interpret the fish and game 
laws to make sure that he was not violating the code of Cali- 
fornia in serving pheasants. 

Next, he consulted the president of the Fish and Game Com- 
mission, and was instructed that each pheasant before it was 
sold would have to have a tag attached to it, which tags were 
furnished by the Commission. The men furnishing the pheas- 
ants were instructed to rigidly obey the law and secure a tag 
from the Commission, so that every pheasant delivered would 
be properly tagged and secure from confiscation. They were 
not taking any risks of seizure, and the possible regaling of the 
Alms House or penitentiary where other seizures have found 
their way. Nothing was left undone which would insure the 
presence of those pheasants at the wedding breakfast for which 
they were designed. 

So if you read that menu and fancied that any one could have 
it, just pause and picture projecting some three hundred "domes- 
tically raised Mongolian pheasants" into service, proving that 
each and every one is domestically raised, is Mongolian, and 
tagged bona fide. 

@ 9 © 

Gertrude Atheiton says that she misses the music of Munich, 
and had promised herself a winter there, but she returned to 
San Francisco the other day in order to register, and will re- 
main here until after the November election in order to cast 



Puckett's College of Dancing 

ASSEMBLY HALL 1268 Sutter strict 

A more beautiful ballroom could hardly be conceived. 

Classes Mondays; Classes and Social, Wednesdays; Assemblies Fridays. 

Private Lessons 

HALL FOR RENT Phone Franklin 118 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



her first presidential vote. She established a residence here 
during the suffrage campaign, and took an eager if not an active 
interest in the votes for women campaign. 

The other day a number of people at the Francisca Club were 
discussing the fact that Mrs. Atherton had traveled six thousand 
miles in order to vote, and was foregoing a winter of musical 
delight. "She is certainly a good citizen," acknowledged a 
woman who is lacking in civic consciousness, but knows some- 
thing about music. "I'm sure Mrs. Atherton will vote intelli- 
gently; doubtless she knows more about voting than music. 
You know in her book about the opera singer she has a woman 
sing Wagner out-of-doors without an accompaniment. Singers 
do such strange things in books!" 

© © © 

The arrival of Mrs. Patrick Calhoun next week is eagerly 
awaited by her friends. Miss Julia Langhorne, who is to be 
married on August 14th, tried to prevail upon Miss Martha Cal- 
houn to await her mother's coming, but Miss Calhoun is now in 
Cleveland acting as mistress of the house in her mother's ab- 
sence. She was Miss Langhorne's guest during June and part 
of July. The bridesmaids for the wedding, which will be an 
evening affair at St. Luke's, are Marian Newhall, Sara Cun- 
ningham, Louise Boyd and Constance Duane, a cousin from 
New York. Lieutenant James Parker, the groom, is now sta- 
tioned on the Pacific Coast, and will be attended by four brother 
officers. The house reception following the church ceremony 
will be a small affair, limited to relatives and most intimate 
friends. 



DEL MONTE SOCIAL NOTES. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Payot arrived early in the week, and 
were not left alone a minute, for the big hotel is filled with 
San Francisco friends and Coast visitors, as well as the large 
interior cities. 

Major F. H. Sargent, of the Presidio, of San Francisco, is 
down for a long stay with his family. Miss Alice M. Sargent, 
who is quite a favorite around Monterey, is recovering from a 
recent illness, and the surroundings of the peninsula are espec- 
ially conducive to her recovery and good spirits. Then the 
golf links of Del Monte are better than a medicine ball. 

Mr. J. W. Byrne, for many years a worshiper at the shrine of 
California, and member of the Pacific Union Club, always with 
an eye for the best as well as substantial comforts, is again at 
Del Monte, with his mother. Mrs. James Irvine, and expects to 
remain until October. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. G. C. Hahn, of Menlo Park, with the small 
member and nurse, drove in from the North on Tuesday, and 
were joined by Mr. and Mrs. Edward Salz, of San Francisco, 
who are in no hurry to leave the alluring place. 



Harris Weinstock, the well-known authority on political 

economy, gave an excellent lecture on the Panama Canal last 
Wednesday at the University of California. Mr. Weinstock is 
a regent of the University, and his lectures are always looked 
upon with favor. He had returned recently from a tour of the 
canal zone, during which he talked with Colonel Goethals and 
with the members of his corps. "The canal," Weinstock said, 
"will make the Pacific Coast the great industrial center, not 
only of the West, but of the nation. The cost of transportation 
of commodities from New York to San Francisco by way of the 
canal will be less than the corresponding cost of transportation 
from New York to Pittsburg. The tremendous industrial 
development of the Eastern States has been due in greatest 
measure to this cheapness of intertransportation, to which, by 
reason of the Panama Canal, the Pacific Coast is now to fall 
heir." 



"I suppose your wife was more than delighted at your 

raise of salary, wasn't she?" asked Jones of Brown. "I haven't 
told her yet, but she will be when she knows it," answered 
Brown. "How is it that you haven't told her ?" "Well, I thought 
I would enjoy myself a couple of weeks first." — Judge. 



City Candy in the Country. — Specially packed for sending by 
mail or express. Can be sent from any of Geo. Haas & Sons' 
four candy stores in San Francisco. 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Turkish Baths 

12 th Floor 

Ladies' Hair Dressing Parlors 

2d Floor 

Cafe 

White and Gold Restaurant 

Lobby Floor 

Electric Grill 

Barber Snop 

Basement. Geary Street Entrance 

Under the management of James Woods 



HOTEL SUTTER 



Cor. Sutter and Kearny 



San Francisco 



In the center of retail and wholesale shopping 

district. 
New. modern, up-to-date and fire-proof. 
250 rooms— single or en suite. Rates $1.50 

per day and upwards. 
Take any taxicab from Ferry or Railway 

depots at expense of the hotel. 
Cater to patrons of the famous Occidental 

and Lick Hotels of ante- 1906 days. 

Excellent Cafe in connection Merchants Lunch 50c 

Table d'Hote Dinner with Wine $1.00 



HOTEL MONTGOMERY 



San Jose's Newest Hotel 



Fireproof 



Rates $1.00 and up 
F. J. McHENRY, Manager 



European Plan 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

DEL MONTE 

PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL 

PACIFIC GROVE 

Arrange to spend your summer months on the Monterey Peninsula. 
No spot in California offers so much as does Del Monte, Monterey and 
Pacific Grove with its beautiful mountain scenery, drives, and par- 
ticularly the unexcelled grassy course of the 

Del Monte Golf & Country Club 

Both hotels under the same management. 
Write for rates, literature, etc., to 

H. R. WARNER, Del Monte, California 



STEVENS 
DURYEA 



For supreme satisfaction in tour- 
ing: the STEVENS-DURYEA SIX. 
With Its "unit power plant" 
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the maximum of power efficiency, 
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truly delightful. 



"SIX" PACIFIC MOTOR CAR 
CO., Distributors 
Golden Gate Avenue at Polk Street 
San Frandsco, Cal. 




SOCHL-'EERSOMBL ITEMS 




Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear in the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 

KENDALL-EELLAMORE.-Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kendall of Grimes 
Hill, N. Y., announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Muriel, 
to Davis H. Bellamore, son of Mr. and Mrs. David G. Bellamore of 
New York City. 

MET CALF- CLARK. —Mrs. "Victor H. Metcalf this week announced the 
engagement of her sister, Miss "Viva Nicholson, to Mr. Leon Clark. 
The wedding will take place in September. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

CASEY-BROWN.— The wedding of Miss Ruth Casey and Arthur Brown 
will take place in the middle of September. It will be an elaborate 
wedding at the home of the bride's aunt, Mrs. Frederic Hope Beaver, 
on Webster street. 

KRAFT-GUNN. — The marriage of Miss Ernestine Kraft and George Gunn 
will take place the first week in September at the home of the bride's 
sister, Mrs. Joseph Edward Birmingham, on Pierce street. 

LANGHORNE-PARKER.— Miss Julia Langhorne has chosen August 14th 
as the date for her wedding with Lieutenant James Parker, U. S. N. 
The ceremony will be performed at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in 
Van Ness avenue, the Rev. Edward Morgan officiating. 

MILLER-FORD. — Miss Marian Miller and Mr. Bernard Ford will be mar- 
ried on Die evening of September 11th at the home of the bride-elect's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller, in Pacific avenue and Baker 
street. 

WHITTLE-SYMMES.— Miss Grace Whittle and Mr. Leslie Webb Symmes 
will be married on August Hth at the home of Mr, and Mrs. A. M. 
Whittle in Mill Valley, only the immediate relatives attending. 
WEDDINGS. 

GARLINGTON-CKAMBERLAIN.— The wedding of Miss Sallie Garlington 
and Lieutenant Harry Dwight Chamberlain, TJ. S. A., took place Wed- 
nesday in Washington. D. C. 

JUNGBLUTH-BROTGHTON.— Miss Olga Jungbluth and Mr. Irwin Reece 
Broughton were married at the home of the bride's grandparents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Ohiandt, Monday evening. 

LOWE-WOUMANN— The wedding of Miss Edith Lowe and Hans Wol- 
mann took pla<-e Friday at Christ Church, Sausalito. 

MASSON-GARNIER. — Cards have been received from Paris announcing 
the marriage of Miss Clotilde Masson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Masson, formerly of this city, to Alain Garnier, which took place June 
17th. Mr. and Mrs. Gamier will make their home in Paris. 

PARKER-SMART.— The wedding of Miss Thelma Parker and Henry 
Gaillard Smart was solemnized on Thursday in the Hawaiian Islands. 
It was an elaborate affair, in Walmea, the large ranch owned by Miss 
Parker, and was distinguished by a typical Hawaiian celebration. 
The bride is the daughter of Mrs. Frederick Knight, and is a grand- 
daughter of Colonel Sam Parker. Mr. Smart is a Virginian, and lias 
many friends here. The young couple will live in Honolulu for a few 
months after their wedding before coming to this city. 

TAYLOR-SMITH. — September 6th is the date set for the marriage of Miss 
Cereta Taylor and Mr. George Smith. The ceremony will take place 
at Grace Cathedral. 

WINSLOW-WALLACE. — The wedding of Mrs. Sarah Stetson Winslow 
and Colonel Hamilton S. Wallace, U. S. A., will lake place later in the 
month, but the exact date has not been announced. 
LUNCHEONS. 

BISHOP. — Mrs. Thomas Bishop entertained at a luncheon for Mrs. Dawson 
Blackburn, the guest of Mis. Martin Crimmlns, recently. 

COOPER. — Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Cooper ained at an lnf< irmal luncheon 

recently at the St. Francis foi s group of frlendfi from Eurlingaine. 

PARDY. — Mrs. William S\ Pardy entertained at a luncheon at her home 
near San Rafael recently. 

TAYLOR. — Mrs. Charles Taylor gave a farewell luncheon at the Palace 
Hotel recently, prior to leaving for a sojourn of several months in 
the North. 

TEAS. 

BRAVERMAN. — Miss Florence Braverman entertained several friends In- 
formally at tea at the Palace recently. 
DINNERS. 

CRIMM1NS. — Mr. and Mrs. Martin Crlmmins entertained at a dinner at 
their quarters at the Presidio recently, for Mrs. Dawson Blackburn. 

MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin gave a dinner Tuesday evening In honor 
of Mrs. Carroll Buck. 

MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin was hostess at a dinner on Thursday 
night, at which she entertained In honor of Mr. and Mrs. E. O. Mc- 
Cormick. 

McCOMAS. — Mr. and Mrs. Francis McComas entertained at an elaborate 
dinner given recently at their home in Monterey, and several guests 
from this city went down for the occasion. 

SHARON. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Sharon entertained at dinner recently 
in honor of Mrs. Charles B. Alexander of New York. 
CARDS. 

RAY. — Mrs. Charles M. Ray and her niece. Miss Nina Blow, gave a hand- 
some bridge tea for Mrs. Roland Schumann recently. 
HOUSE PARTIES. 

McNEAR. — Miss Miriam McNear has been entertaining a house pa 

the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Mr-Near, at Petaluma. 



TUBES. — Miss Emily Tubbs was hostess at a house party given for less 

than a score of guests recently at her Palo Alto home. 
WILLIAMSON. — A number of young people left Friday to spend the week- 
end with Mrs. D. E. W. Williamson and her daughter, Miss Dorothy 

Williamson, at the Williamson summer home at Guerneville. 
THEATRE PARTIES. 
MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin gave an enjoyable theatre party recently 

in honor of Miss Rosita Nieto, who is spending a week at the Palace 

with her aunt. Baroness Rosenweig. 

DANCES. 
McINTOSH. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles K. Mcintosh gave a dance at the 

Menlo Country Club recently in honor of Miss Evelyn and Genevieve 

Cunningham. 
MORROW. — Miss Arabella Monow entertained recently at a dance in honor 

of Miss Virgina Walsh of Los Angeles. 
MOTORING. 
DOWLER. — Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Dowler and their daughter and son, Flor- 
ence and Fred Wlckersham, are enjoying a motor trip through South- 
ern California. 
FRANK.— Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Frank are motoring through Central 

California, making a stop at several places of Interest. 
FL'LLER. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Fuller have returned from a motor trip 

through Lake County. Several days were spent at Aetna Springs. 
GUESS. — Mr. and Mrs. Jules Gless, Miss Florence Welsh, of Colusa, and 

Miss Lucille Green spent the week-end at Santa Cruz, motoring by 
of Los Gatos to visit friends en route. 
GRANT. — Mrs. Adam Grant, who, with Mrs. B. B. Cutter, has been motor- 
ing through the southern part of the State, has returned to her home 

in this city. 
GRENCH. — Mrs. H. Glen Grench has returned from an automobile trip to 

Los Angeles and other southern points. 
HAMILTON. — Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hamilton are away In their 

machine on a jaunt that will keep them out of town for a couple of 

weeks. 
1IELLMANN. — Mrs. George H. Hcllmann returned this week to her home 

in California street after a motor trip through the Santa Cruz 

Mountains. 
HEWLETT. — Mr. and Mrs. George Hewlett are motoring through Southern 

Europe. They are now In Rome. 
HUNTINGTON.— Mrs. Mary A. Huntington and Miss Marian Huntington 

e left on an automobile trip through Southern California. 
KKXVON. — The Misses Anna and Emma Kenynn left early in the week 

for a motor trip with friends through Southern California, and will 

be av i < ral days. 

LEWITT. — Dr. and Mrs. W. B. Lewitt are away on a motor trip through 

the North. 
ROSS. — The Misses Ida and Josephine Ross, accompanied by Mrs. Adrian 

Von Eeluens, are enjoying a motor trip through the southern part of 

France and Italy. 
SPLIYALO.— Mr. and Mrs. Ray B. Spllvalo. Mr. and Mrs. Adrian Spllvalo, 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Ryan, are on an automobile tour in Central Cali- 
fornia, 

ARRIVALS. 
ALEXANDER.— Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Alexander and the Misses 

Alexander have returned from Del Monte, and are occupying their 
i tnenta at the Fairmont. 
ASHTON. — Mrs. George F. Ashton and her daughters, the Misses Helen 

and Bessie Ashton. have come over from San Rafael, and have re- 
opened their apartment at the St. Xavler. 
BAKER.— Miss Dorothj Bak< t baa returned from a visit to Mr. and Mrs. 

Itt Baker at thi Bakei ranch near Sisson. 
BEUT1IEAU. — Rudolph Bertheau has returned from Monterey, where he 

has been the guesl of Gayle Anderton. 
BONESTELL .Mrs. J. C. Bonestell of Fresno is visiting friends In this 

city. 
BULL. — Miss Edith Bull has returned from a tour of the world, and Is 

visiting her sister, Mrs. v'ovington Pringle, at Menlo Park. 
CALHOUN.— Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Calhoun, Judge and Mrs. J. H. Reed. 

Mr. and Mis. .Mason B. Starling, and Mr. George Bacon are a party of 

Cleveland people at the Palace. 
CLARK.— Miss Elise Clark has returned from Woodslde, where she has 

been the guest of Mrs. H. McDonald Spenci P. 
DE OJEDA. — Mrs. Francisco de Ojeda and Miss Nadine and Miss 

Yvonne de Ojeda have returned from a two weeks' visit to Del Monte. 
DIBBLEE. — Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin H. Dlbblee. who have been enjoying 

a visit in New York and Washington, have arrived from the East, and 

have gone over to Ross. 
DREYFUS.— A visitor to California is Louis Dreyfus. Jr.. who has lately 

arrived from Berlin. He Is at present In Santa Barbara, which was his 

former home. 
FEE. — Miss Marcla Fee has returned from Shasta Springs, where she was 

the ^uest for a week of Mr. and Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale. 
FTSNWICK. — Mrs. Fred Fenwlck has come from her summer camp near 

the Yosemlte, and Is spending a few days at her home on Pacific 

avenue. 
FLETCHER. — Mr. and Mrs, James C. Fletcher are here on their annual 

visit from Yokohama, making their home with the latter's mother, 

Mis. "W. B. Mills, and grandmother, Mrs. Simon Wenban, at 1286 Pine 

street. 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



FOLLANSBEE.— Mr. ana Mrs. A. W. Kollansbee ha d from 

Honolulu, and are again at their Green Btreet home. 

GIRVIN.— Mrs. Richard Girvin and Mis* Lee GfrvlD have returned to their 
'merits at the Bellevue, after a visit of several weeks to Del 
Monte. 

HECHTMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Walter Ivan Hechtman have returned from 
their honeymoon trip, and have taken an apartment In Jones and 
Sacramento streets. 

HOLLIDAY.— Mr. and Mrs. Burke llolliday. who were visiting in Los An- 
geles, have returned to their home In this city. 

HORSBURGH. — Mr. and Mrs. James HorsbUXgh, who have 1 n 0X1 the 

Atlantic Coast for six weeks, are again in town. 

JEFFRESS. — Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Garfield Jeffress have returned to their 
home in Berkeley, after having gone down to Del Monte for a brief 
visit. 

JOHNSON. — Among the recent arrivals from the Orient is Captain Graham 
Johnson, U. S. A., who is at the Palace for a week. 

KELHAM. — Mr. and Mrs. George Kelham and Bruce Kelham, who have 
been in the Santa Cruz Mountains for the past month, returned to 
town recently. 

LANGHORNE. — Miss Julia Langhorne has returned from a week-end visit 
with friends in the Napa Valley. 

LEE. — Mr. and Mrs. Cuyler Lee have returned from Del Monte. 

MARTIN. — Mr. and Mrs. Carl Martin have returned from Tahoe, and 
have taken apartments for the winter at the "Gainsborough," 2977 
Pacific avenue. 

MILLER. — Richard E. Miller, president of the Owl Drug Co., returned 
recently from a 10.000 mile automobile tour of Europe, which began 
at Naples and ended at Paris. Mr. Miller was accompanied home by 
his wife and his brother, Dr. Thurlow Miller, and his wife. Last Octo- 
ber the two ladies sailed from this port for Japan on a tour of the 
world. Mr. Miller and his brother left here February 3d last, via New 
York, and joined the ladies in Cairo. Landing at Naples later on, they 
greatly enjoyed autoing through many lands. 

MILLER. — Mr. and Mrs. Christian Miller have returned to San Francisco 
after a visit with Mrs. Miller's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Rhinehart, in 
Covington, Va. 

MITCHELL. — Wallace Mitchell and Bert Farrel returned to their home 
in Ross on Monday, and Fred Bromley Jansen, Jr., returned to his 
home in town after spending several weeks at his country place on 
the banks o" the Russian River. The two young men were his house 
guests. 

MORGAN. — Miss Ella Morgan came up from Del Monte during the week, 
and is the guest of her sister, Mrs. Norris King Davis, in her charming 
San Mateo home. 

MULLALLY,- Thornwell Mullally has returned to San Francisco after B 
visit of several weeks In the East 

MURPHY. — Captain and Mrs. John Burke Murphy have returned 1mm the 
Yosemite; and are at their quarters at the Presidio. 

MURTAG1T.— Mrs. John Murtagh, wife of Major Murtagh, U. S. A., ar- 
rived this week for a visit, and is the guest of her mother, Mrs. J. de 
Barth Shorn, in Broadway. 

NEWHALL. — Miss Virginia Newhall has returned from Los Angeles. 

PAGET. — Reginald and Arthur Paget have returned from a trip to the 
Santa Cruz Mountains. 

PILLS'BURY.— Mr. and Mrs. Horace D. Plllsbury have returned fcfl 
outing at Del Monte and in the southern pari of the Stati 

PONIATOWSKL — Mr, Stanislaus Poniatowskl. the oldest son ol 

and Princess Poniatowskl, of Paris, is a guest of his aim. 

Mr. and Mrs. William II. Crocker at New Place, Hillsborough, planning 

to pass the sui r In California 

RUCKER. — Mrs. Joseph Rucker and Miss Edith Rucker, who hai 

enjoying b ataj of a month at Santa Barbara, have 
RUSSELL Miss Mamie Russell ol ■ i to visii Kirs. 

cii irics B. Alexander, 
RUTHERFORD. — Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Rutherford have p 

m tr mm. i r, where thej war i «ls of Mr. Rutherfo ■ ■ ■-. Mrs. 

Philip Kearnj and Mis. Langdoxi Ervlng. 
SIMPSON.- Mrs. John Sli n ling the wli 

Sforh and >■ I 

will be established for the fail and winter months in an attractive 

apartmi 
SPRHCKELS. mi and Ura John p nd a party of friends re- 

turned Mondaj nam the North, where they went on their yacht 

Vent i Le 
unit 1 i Parker Whitney, Jr., came up from Monten 

Monday, and will pass the weuk In town with friends. 

ir. and Mrs. .1. W. Wright, Edgerton and Harvey Wright, 

have returned from Del Monte. 

DEPARTURES. 

AKKiv Dr. and Mi axles F. Aked have left for a month's outing at 

Pelican B 
BOURN. Mr. and Mrs William Bourn have left for Ireland, where they 

Will be the guests Of their daughter and >..n-in-la\v, Mr. and Mis. 

Arthur Roe 
BUCK. " s Prank Buck, Jr., will rtly for Laki 

several weeks. 
nt and Mrs Bruce Butler have left for Fort E 

AlasH ;!e >"- 

DTJTTON, Mr and Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton, who have been at the Bur- 

lingame Count n Club tor the past month, have left for Santa Ba 
EACRE 6ft this u.-'-k tor a visit in New 

Yo,k City, and will be away for a month. 
PARNHAM, i" ind Mis. D. C, Parnhara have h-ft tor New York, and 

FBNNtt Mrs. Arthur Penoll 

Wh< 



CII. US 

Mrs. Stuarl S, Wright, at theli ho has left toi 

home n er. 

GRSBNBAUM. Mr. and Mrs. Leon I have gono to Portland. 

where they will remain for about two weeks. 
HARRISON.- Mrs. i iaa lafl for Fort B 

Geoi 
HORST. — Mr. and .Mrs. B. Clemens Horsl n have gone 

to San Ral mer. 
HOYT. Lieutenanl and Mrs. Charles Shei Hoyi leai ihortly for 

Fort Sheridan, II!.. which will be ic for the next j 

two. 
JOHNSON. — Mrs. Eugene Cooper Johnson has returned to her hoi 

Los Angeles, after visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brlgham, 

at their home In Los Gal 
KAISER. — Mr. Joe Kaiser and sun, of L26 Highland avenue, left recently 

for North i tend, Oregon, to visit Mr. Kaiser's brother, Mr. Cha i tea 

Kaiser, They went as Car as Eureka by automobile, and on ace I 

of bad roads were compelled to tak< boal from Eureka to North Bend. 

They expect to be gone about a month. 
LANSDALE. — Mrs. Philip Van Home Lansdale has gone East to visit her 

brother-in-law and sister. Mr. and Mrs. George Hoodj at their home 

in Philadelphia. 
MARTIN. — Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Martin have returned to "Stag's 

Leap," after having spent the week in Burlingame with Mrs. Martin's 

father, Mr. Henry T. Scott. 
MCALLISTER.— Mr. and Mrs. Hall McAllister and Miss Ethel McAllister 

are on their way to the Yellowstone Park, and expect to be away for 

several weeks on the trip. 
MeBRYDE. — Mr. and Mrs. Douglas MeBryde have gone to their country 

home at Los Gatos, where they will be for the remainder of the 

summer. 
McDERMOTT. — Mrs. A. McDermott, sister of Henry Ward Brown, of San 

Mateo, who has been visiting here for the last few months, has left 

for her home in Washington, D. C. 
PATIGIAN. — Mrs. Haig Patigian and Mrs. Edgar Keithley left Wednesday 

for Santa Barbara, where they will be at the Hotel Potter for the next 

few weeks. 
PILLSBURT. — Mr. and Mrs. Horace Pilisbury left Wednesday for a 

week's outing at the McCloud River Country Club. 
PRATT.— Mr. and Mrs. Orville Pratt have gone to Butte County for a 

few weeks' visit to the Pratt ranch. 
SCHLACKS. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schlacks, who have recently returned 

from a trip East, left recently for Europe. 
SON NT AG". — Mrs. Julian Sonntag, Miss Ila Sonntag and Miss Maye Col- 
burn have gone to Tahoe for a month's visit. 
STEWART.— Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stewart will sail to-day for Victoria. 

where they will enjoy a brief visit before going to Canada and New 

York. 

INTIMATIONS. 
A LEXANDER. — Mrs. Charles O. Alexander has joined her sister, Mrs. 

Adolpb P.. Beheld, at Inverness. 
HALL.— Lieutenant-Colonel George Ball and Mrs. Ball are entertaining 

their son-in-law and & aptaln and Mrs. William S. Wood, in 

their apartments at the Hotel Richelieu. 
BENEDICT.— Mrs, Edgai Judson Benedict Is at Carlsbad, where she was 

joined by her son, Mr George Gllison, and friends. She plans to be 

away Indefinitely. 
I'd. AIR. — Mrs. Samuel Blaii and Miss Jennie Blair are at Del Monte. 
BREWER. -Mlsa Vm Bn ver, who - been thi gues! of her brother-in- 
law a Vfr. and Mrs, Edward Cudahy, In Chicago, has gone 
visit to relal ■' I ' 

fHTON. Mr. and Mrs, Irwin B aiding their honej 

moon in the North. 

\X Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carolan will sail for New York next 

Monday, and will come Straight through to California. 

CHASE". — Mi Bora- Blanchard Chas< I ahoe visiting at the villa 

at Mr. an. i a s. Tevis. 

COLBURN. — Miss May.- Tod. urn. who Is at her home in San Rafael, Is 

planning to come to the Fairmont early in the fall. 
COOK.-— Mrs. Horatio B. Cook and her son. Clifford Cook, who came from 
their ranch In Mendocino County. 

(Continued to Page 22.) 



THE Le GRAND 

Ladies' Tailors 

BRANCH OF OUR NEW YORK ESTABLISHMENT 
FIFTH AVENUE AND 32nd STREET 

In order to introduce our high class work we will make 
during the summer months our 

$85.00 Suits for $70.00 

80 00 Suits for 85.00 

75.00 Suits for 60.00 

70.00 Suits for 5500 

65.00 Suits for 50.00 

80.00 Suits for 45.00 

55.00 Suits for 40.00 

60.00 Suits for 15.00 



»07 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PHONE DOUGLAS 4122 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 




FINANCIAL 




Coal Production The United States has become a 

In the Year 1911. half billion ton coal country. Dur- 

ing the last two years the total pro- 
duction has averaged just a trifle short of the 500,000,000 mark, 
exceeding that figure in 1910 and almost reaching it in 1911. It 
is considered probable that in the future it will be a bad year 
whose production falls far short of this quantity. The final 
figures of prodrction have been compiled by Edward W. Par- 
ker, the government coal statistician, and are discussed by him 
in a statement just issued by the United States Geological Sur- 
vey. They show a total production in 1911 of 496,188,308 short 
tons, valued at the mines at $625,910,113. Of this production 
Pennsylvania anthracite amounted to 90,464,067 short tons, 
valued at $174,952,415, and bituminous coal and lignite to 405,- 
724,241 tons, valued at $450,957,698. The decrease in produc- 
tion in 1911 was 5,408,070 tons, or a little over 1 per cent, in 
quantity, and $3,646,908, or a little over 0.5 per cent in value. 
The decrease is attributed by Mr. Parker wholly to the de- 
pressed condition of the iron and steel trades in 1911, which was 
reflected in the decreased production of coke. The three lead- 
ing coke producing States alone showed an aggregate decrease 
of nearly 9,000,000 short tons of coal. 

The decrease in the production of bituminous coal compared 
with 1910 was 11,386,901 tons, but this loss was largely made 
up by the increase in the production of anthracite, which was 
5,978,831 short tons greater than in 1910. 

Considering the marked decrease in the production and con- 
sumption of coke and the fact that large quantities of coal in 
addition to that used for coke making are consumed in the iron 
trade, the comparatively small net decrease of less than 6,000,- 
000 tons in coal production must be taken as an indication that 
other manufacturing industries, the transportation companies, 
and the country generally were prosperous. The average price 
for bituminous coal was 1 cent a ton lower in 1911 than in 1910, 
and that of anthracite was 3 cents higher. 

The total number of men employed in the coal mines of the 
United States in 1911 was 722,322, of which 172,585 worked in 
the anthracite mines of Pennsylvania. The average number of 
days worked in the anthracite mines was 246, and in the other 
mines 211. The average production per man was 3V2 tons a day 
in the bituminous and lignite mines, and 2.13 tons a day in the 
anthracite. The time lost by strikes in 1911 was insignificant. 



A small flurry struck a number of 
Mining Share Market, issues in the Goldfields and Tono- 

pahs this week. How extensive the 
rise will be has not yet developed. At any rate, it is one of 
those ripples which have occurred during the past six months to 
carry prices to horizontally higher levels on the score of the 
improved showings being generally made. The Tonopahs 
started this line of action shortly after the last big strike in 
Belmont developed the fact that the Tonopah camp possessed 
permanent ore at depth. This week's rise was led by Tonopah 
Meyer, which easily trebled in price to $1.30, and by Meyer 
mines of Goldfield, the latter going over the 60 mark. A cross- 
cut will be run from a depth of about 1400 feet in the big Meyer 
shaft to connect with a like working from the 1400 foot level 
of the Grizzly Bear shaft of Goldfield, Con., when the depths 
named are reached in the respective properties. The two shafts 
are about 600 feet apart. An average of about 100 feet per 
month is being maintained in the important Meyer mines shaft, 
which is being sunk to determine definitely the deep mining 
possibilities of its territory. Midway, of the Tonopah group, 
was the strongest and most active issue there during the week, 
because of the character of the ore, which has enabled the 
company to resume temporary shipping. Big Four and the 
othe r Manhattans all report themselves in promising ore bodies, 
and the shipments being made bear out these reports. Flor- 
ence is at work on a crosscut on the 300 foot level, which prom- 
ises to furnish some interesting developments. The Comstocks 
continue to mark time, owing to a hitch in the work of unwater- 



ing the mines on the lower levels. Those handling the engineer- 
ing end of the problem expect to have it remedied at an early 
date. 



Local Stocks 
And Bonds. 



Though the stock and bond market 
developed light trading during the 
week, prices were well maintained, 
and went higher in a number of 
bonds, owing to the inquiry of the July dividend money still 
seeking investment in first-class securities. Pacific Gas & Elec- 
tric, Pacific Tel. & Tel., Great Western Power, the Oro issues, 
S. P. Refundings, People's Water 5's, and a number of other 
bonds attained higher prices. In stocks, Hutchinson and Ono- 
mea Sugars gained in value; so did Alaska Packers on its ex- 
cellent prospects of a big catch. Giant Powder, Natomas Con. 
and others. This movement in purchases was of an investment 
character only, and bore none of the slightest ear marks of 
speculation, even in the sugars. The semi-annual reports from 
all the public utilities show a satisfactory increase in net sur- 
plus, despite the growing aggregate in cost of production and 
maintenance. Leading officials of the United Railways Com- 
pany arrived here during the week on their regular inspection 
of the company's several plants. They report that no big 
change of consequence is on the carpet, and that there is no 
ground for the report that the company's San Mateo line would 
be extended to Monterey. 



British consols this week dropped to 
British Consols 73 3 /j. the lowest level in 80 years. 

Supported. Increased expenditures forecasted in 

the speech on an additional appro- 
priation for the navy by the First Lord of the Admiralty in the 
House of Commons helped the decline. With a market satu- 
rated with securities, the apprehension of increased govern- 
ment expenditures was sufficient to keep the quotation down. 
The government later checked the downward movement by 
purchasing $10,000,000 in the open market. This is in line 
with a promise it made consol holders several weeks ago. 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



New York Slock Exchange 

New York Cotton Exchange 

Chicago Board of Trade 

The Stock and Bond Exchange, San Francisco 



Main Office 

MILLS BUILDING 

Sin Francisco. California 



Branch Offices 

Loa Angeles San Diego 
Coronado Beach Portland, Ore. 
Seattle, Wash. Vancouver, B. C. 



H. ZADIG 

Member 
Merchants' Exchange 



E. P. BARRETT 

Member 
S. F. Stock Exchange 



ZADIG & CO 



STOCK BROKERS 



324 Bush St., San Francisco. Cal. 



Phone Kearny 1725 



ON JULY 1, 1*12 

Our offices were moved to 410 Montgomery Street 

Our Facilities for handling: 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

Will be considerably increased 

Established 1858 

SUTRO & CO. 



Telephone Sutter 3434 



Private Exchange Connecting all Depts. 






July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



The State Railroad Commission has granted the People's 

Water Company permission to issue promissory notes at a total 
of $571,000 to take up existing obligations and to use as security 
therefor its 5 per cent bonds not to exceed $1,600,000. Appli- 
cation has also been made by the Union Home Telephone and 
Telegraph Corporation for permission to issue $173,000 of bonds 
as security for notes to the amount of $113,175. These notes 
are to be used in meeting existing obligations. The company's 
headquarters are in San Bernardino County. 



Returns for May of fifty representative railroads, operat- 
ing in all sections of the country, with a mileage of approxi- 
mately 148,000, show an increase in gross earnings of 2.42 per 
cent and a decrease in net earnings of 6.76 per cent. This com- 
pares with an increase in gross of 2.59 per cent and a de- 
crease of 11.3 per cent in net for the month of April. Operating 
ratio, exclusive of taxes, but including net results of outside 
operations, was 70.8 per cent, as against 68.7 per cent in May, 
1911. The greater portion of the decrease in net earnings was 
due to the comparatively poor showing of the hard coal roads. 

Notice is given that under the deed of trust all the out- 
standing bonds of the Stockton Gas and Electric Corporation 
have been called for payment and redemption on January 1, 
1914, at the office of the Mercantile Trust Company at the 
face value thereof and a premium of 6 per cent thereon, together 
with all interest accrued and unpaid on the date mentioned, on 
which date interest will cease. Any of these bonds will be paid 
if presented at the office of the trust company before January 
1, 1914, at the face value thereof, and a premium of 6 per cent, 
together with accrued interest to date of payment. 



The Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company reports 

to the New York Stock Exchange for the quarter ended March 
31, 1912, as follows: Gross revenue, $3,957,777; operating ex- 
penses and taxes, maintenance and depreciation, $3,076,584; 
net revenue, $881,193; interest, $548,285; balance, $332,908; 
preferred dividends, $275,250; surplus, $57,658. 



WHY THE DELAY? 

The Engineer's Department of San Francisco is still lax in 
providing plans for an incinerator plant at North Beach. A 
garbage plant was needed in 1908. During the four years 
since that time, the need has not decreased. Why does not the 
Board of Supervisors consider that, hasten the work, have the 
City Engineer and the Board of Works start something. 

Last December, the Supervisors declared that the incinera- 
tors would be built at once. The incinerators are still unbuilt. 

The public health demands that the garbage of a great city 
like San Francisco be disposed of scientifically, expeditiously, 
hygienically. The city is busy removing shacks and making 
basements rat proof, looking for the germ of this and that ex- 
otic disease, but neglects the conditions which will cause the 
more homely, but as dangerous diseases, such as typhoid fever. 

Because the City Engineer is not ready to present plans is 
no reason why the site should not be selected at once. The 
money for that purpose is at hand, and land values are steadily 
advancing. The land should be acquired at once, and the 
Engineer's Department should be notified to prepare plans im- 
mediately. Further than this, the Board of Works should be 
forced to get busy and build the plant at the earliest possible 
moment. 

The public voted money for an incineration system four 
years ago, and it is about time that these plans were finished. 



Dr. Washington Dodge has resigned his office of As- 
sessor of San Francisco, which he has occupied for over twelve 
years, to take the position of first vice-president of the Anglo 
and London-Paris National Bank, a change which has been in 
contemplation for over a year. He will assume his new duties 
August 1st. John Ginty, chief assistant of the Assessor's office, 
was appointed to fill the position vacated by Dr. Dodge. 



STABILITY AND STRENGTH 



SUN 

OF LONDON 

MICHIGAN 

FIRE AND MARINE OF DETROIT 



Resources Over $47,000,000.00 



NATIONAL 

OF HARTFORD 

MECHANICS & TRADERS 

OF NEW ORLEANS 



COLONIAL 

FIRE UNDERWRITERS AGENCY 

SUN 

UNDERWRITERS 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 



WILLARD 0. WAYMAN & CARL A. HENRY 



FRANK E. STONE 



JOINT GENERAL AGENTS 

MAXWELL H. THOMSON 

Assistant General Agents 



Sansome and Sacramento Streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

Branch Offices: Los Angeles, Cal., Portland, Ore., Seattle and Spokane, 'Wash, and Denver, Colo. 

Agents Wanted in Erery City, Town or Village 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 



SsckH smndl IP@irs@na@l h<sm§ 



(Continued from Page 19.) 

COOPER. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Cooper, who have been abroad for sev- 
eral months, are now in Vevy, Switzerland, where they will remain for 
the summer. 

CORYELL.— Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Coryell are guests of Lieutenant Ar- 
thur Poillon at the army post In Yosemite Park. 

CROCKER. — Mr. and Mrs. Templeton Crocker are making their plans to 
return to Honolulu, where they will remain at the Irwin home at 
Waikiki. 

CROPPER. — Mrs. Laura Welter Cropper will leave early next month for 
Berkeley, to remain for several months. 

CROSBY. — Dr. and Mrs. Dan Crosby were recent visitors In New York, 
where they had a delightful time, and were entertained by friends. 

CROTHERS. — Mr. and Mrs. George Crothers will arrive from New York 
the latter p.rt of the month. 

CUNNINGHAM. — Mrs. Mary Cunningham and her daughters, Miss Sara 
and Miss Mary Cunningham, spent the week-end as the guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. James Athearn Folgt r at Woodside. 

DAKIN.-=-Mrs. F. H. Dakin, Miss Alice Schroth and Mrs. M. E. Hebbard 
are at Feather River Lodge for a few weeks' stay. 

DAVIS, — Mr. and Mrs. "Win field Davis have been enjoying a tour of the 
North. 

I)E VKCCHL— Dr. Paoli de Vecchl and his son. Robert, of this city, who 
have been spending the summer with Mrs. de Vecchi and Miss de 
Vecchi at Bass Rocks, Mass.. are now in New York. 

DIBBLE.— Mr, and Mrs. Oliver Dibble are spending the summer at Menlo 
Park. 

DOLAN.— M. J. Dolan and Miss Alice Dolan are at Klamath to remain 
several weeks. 

EASTON. — Mrs. Adeline Mills Easton. the venerable grandmother of Mrs. 
Malcolm D. "Whitman, will make her future home with her son's fam- 
ily. Mr. Ansel Baston, at Burlingame. 

FARRELL. — Mrs. James Farrell, Mr. and Mrs. James Shea and Miss 
Kathleen Farrell are at Tahoe for the month. 

KKNNIMORE. — Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Fennimore have taken an apartment 
on Pacific avenue, which they will occupy during the winter. 

FOS"S. — Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Foss will be here until fall. They are 
making their home with Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred B. Chapman. 

GARCEATJ. — Mrs, Alexander Garceau, accompanied by Mrs. Camiiio Mar- 
tin and Miss Hyde, will leave shortly for New i'ork. 

GODCHAtTX. — Miss Rebecca and Miss Josephine Godchaux have gone to 
San Jose for an outing of a few days. 

GRANT. — Major and Mrs. Frank A. Grant, who have been living in Ber- 
keley, expect to dispose of their home in the college town, and will be 
in this city for the winter. They will be established at Fort Mason, 
according to their present plans. 

GRAVES. — Mrs Robert N. Graves, with her grandsons, Melville and Rob- 
ert White, are at Palo Alto. 

GREEN. — Mr. and Mrs. J. Charles Green are^enjoying a tour of the East- 
ern cities, and wili be absent for some time longer. 

HAMBERGER. — Mrs. W. C. Hamberger and her daughters, the Misses 
Ramona and Alvita, have postponed their European trip until next 
summer. 

HARRELL. — Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Harrell, of Bakeisfleld, have 
apartments at the Fairmont, where they will be domiciled for aei 
months. 

HENLEY. — Mr. and Mrs. Barclay Henley and Barclay Henley. Jr., are 
established for the summer In an attractive cottage In Sausalito. 

HENSHAW. — Mrs. William G. Henshaw, with he] daughter, MiSS Flor- 
iM ■■■ Mnii, and her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Chickering, are planning to pass the remainder of the summer at their 
country home at Mom 

I IKK MM ANN. — Mr. and Mrs. William Herrmann and Miss ESrna Herrmann 
■ e soon for Europe, probably continuing their trip around the world, 
remaining away Indefinitely, 

HERRICK.— Mrs. Lester Horrick is now In the Whit M tains of New 

Hampshire, where she will spend a month. 

HOPKINS.— Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hopkins have returned from their 
honeymoon trip, and are in Menlo Park, staying with Mr. Hopkins' 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Hopkins. 

HUNT.— Miss Florida Hunt is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Son* 
Mill Valley. 

KEENEY. — Miss Innes Keeney is enjoying the summer at Montecito, and 
expects to remain away for several weeks. 

KERR. — Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Kerr are visiting In Seattle, and are en- 
joying a series of motor trips through the northern States. 

LIVERMORE.— Miss Edith Livermore will leave In the fall for Dresden 
Germany, to be the guest of her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and 
Mrs. Alfred Hurtgen. 

LONG. — General and Mrs. Oscar Fitssa'en Long and their daughter. Miss 
Amy Long, are enjoying a delightful outing in Lassen County. 

LUNDBORG. — Mr. and Mrs. Irving Lundborg are at idlewlld in the Santa 
Cruz Mountains. 

LYMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Lyman are settled in their new home in 
Sacri in top where Mr. Lyman !s engaged in business. 

LYMAN. — Dr. and Mrs. George Lyman, who have been abroad since theii 
marriage last December, are settled In Munich for the next three or 
four months. 

Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Eugene Payne, dentists, have resumed 

practice at 146 Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 66. Hours: 9 to 4. 



MARTIN. — Mr. and Mrs. Peter Martin and son have established their home 
In an apartment in Paris, where they will remain for an Indefinite 
time. 

MeBEAN. — Mrs. Athole McBean, who is summering at Auburn, will soon 
spend a few weeks with her paienls. Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Mayo New- 
hall, at Pale Alto. 

McNAB. — Mi. and Mrs. Stuart McNab are enjoying a visit at Banff, but 
will return shortly to their home in this city. 

MERLE. — Mr. and Mrs. Leo Vasserot Merle. Jr.. are in Los Altos, where 
they are the guests of Mrs. Merle's parents. Mr. and Mrs. B. P. Oliver, 
In their country residence. 

MEYERFELT).— Mrs. Morris Meyerfeld and her sister, Mrs. F. Schloss, 
are enjoying a summer outing at Del Monte. 

MILLS. — The Misses Gertrude and Marlon Mills are spending the summer 
at their charming country place in Novate. 

MITCHELL, — Mrs. Morton Mitchell and Miss Edith Johnson, who ar- 
rived last week from Paris, and are at the Fairmont, are planning a 
visit to Santa Barbara. 

MOORE.— Mrs. Philip N. Moore, of St. Louis, is visiting with friends in 
the Yosemite. 

NEWHAIiL. — Miss Marian Newhall enjoyed a visit last week as the guest 
of her sister, Mrs. Athole McBean, at Auburn. 

NEWTON. — Mrs. California Newton and her daughter, Miss Susette New- 
ton, are enjoying a summer outing at Moscow Cottage on the Russian 
River, their country home. 

O'CONNOR.— Miss Lillie O'Connor has been visiting Mrs. James V. Cole- 
man at Mountain View for the last month. 

I'.\i ;KT. — Reginald and Arthur Paget have taken an apartment at the 
Somerset on Pine street. 

PASCHEL. — Mrs. Philip Paschal has taken apartments at the Hotel Belle- 
vui, and will be established there throughout the fall ami winter 
months. 

PKIXOTTO.— Mi. and Mrs. Ernest PelxottO, who recently returned from a 
tour of the South American countries, are at Lake Tahoe for a month's 
sojourn. 

PERINE. — Mr. and Mrs. George M. Perine and Mrs, Duncan McKlnlay are 
at Deer Park Springs at Lake Tahoe for a month. 

PETERS.— Mrs. J. D. Peters and her daughter, Miss Anna I 
Del Monte, where they will remain tor several de 

PIKE. — Mr. and Mrs. Roy Pike have been visiting in New fork, where 
they have been entertained by Mrs. Gen,.: i : : ri Baker. 

PLATT. — Mr. and Mrs. Eugene A. Piatt have taken a I In Mill Valley, 

and will take possession of their summer home about the end of 
August. 

\'< 111,1,1 in. — Mi>*. William Poillon and i") daughter, Miss Gladys Poillon, 
are now In Yosemite Valley, where they are visiting Lieutenant 

Poillon. 

POLK.— Mr. and Mrs. Willis Polk are spending several weeks at tl 
ter in Santa Bai b 

POMEUOY. — Miss Harriet Pomeroy, who has spent the past few months 
abroad, has sailed from England for America. 

RAAS. — Mr. and Mrs, Alfred Raas will pass the remainder of the summer 
at San Rafael, where they have an attractive place. 

RUTHERFORD. — Mr. and -Mrs. Alexander Ruth irford are temporarily at 
the Granada Hot I pending the completion of their new home on a 
ranch out of Paso Roll- 

s» 'ill : .LING. — Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Schilling have been the guests re- 
cently of Mr. and Mrs. A. Schilling at their place In W Is 

SCHLESSINGER. — Mr. and Mrs. Bert Si hlesslnger are entertaining Lieu- 
tenant and Mrs. Albert Rees In theli hoiro on '•■.■■■■ 

SHARON, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Shai tained several friends at 

Hi. Palace ree ntly In honor of Mrs, Jack Breckenrldge of Paris. 

S LOSS.— Mr. and Mrs, Leun Sloss, Louis Sloss and Leon Sloss, Jr., have 
:\i'\\ y/ork, after sevei i spent In Burope. 

SMEDBERG Captain William R. Smedhe-rg, son of the late Colonel 
William Renwlck Smedberg, Is staying at the Palace Hotel. 

TAYLOR.— Mr. and Mrs Felton Ts lor, Mr and Mis. Charles m. Hol- 

i k. Mr. and Mrs, Rufus Thayer, Mr. and Mis. W, S, M i 

Mr. and Mrs. A, Q visiting in Carson i 

TEVIS. — Gordon Lansing and Will T'v Is, Jr., are spending a week in 
town, having comt from Lake Tahoe, where Mrs. Tevls and hei 
are spending the summer. 

THOMPSON. Mrs. Frank Thompson ol Palo Alto Is entertaining as her 
house guest her daughter, Mrs, George Is Farge, the former Miss 
i ;■ >i ierta Thompson. 

WHITE. — Mrs. Lovell White has closed her home on Sacramento street, 
and will spend the remainder of th it her Mill Valley resi- 

dence. 

ZEILK.— The Misses Marion and Ruth Zeile will spend the late summer 
weeks at Santa Barbara. 



Santa Cruz has been the scene this week of one of the 

grandest water celebrations known to that city. Manager Fred 
Swanton outdid himself in aiding the celebration. San Fran- 
cisco was well represented. Practically all of the San Francisco 
yachts which arrived early Sunday morning in the big ocean 
race remained in Santa Cruz harbor Monday, and the five gov- 
ernment vessels, including the cruisers Denver and Cleveland, 
remained on hand to enliven the night and the beach crowds 
with their searchlights. The weather conditions were ideal, 
and the large number of people from all over California made 
up an enjoyable scene at the Casino and Casa del Rey, Santa 
Cruz' new and popular resort. 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



A CALIFORNIAN ABROAD— A MEDIEVAL ROMANCE. 

(Continued from Page 15.) 

Godfrey reigned in Jerusalem — the Christian hosts reared the 
banner of the Cross above the Holy Sepulchre! 

Twilight was approaching. Fifty harlequins, in flowing 
robes, approached this castle wearily, for they were on foot, 
and the dust upon their garments showed that they had traveled 
far. They overtook a peasant, and asked him if it was likely 
they could get food and a hospitable bed there, for love of 
Christian charity, and if perchance a moral parlor entertain- 
ment might meet with generous countenance — "for," said they, 
"this exhibition hath no feature that could offend the most 
fastidious." 

"Marry," quoth the peasant, "an it please your worships, ye 
had better go many a good rood hence with your juggling circus 
than trust your bones in yonder castle." 

"How now, Sirrah!" exclaimed the chief monk; "explain 
thy ribald speech, or by'r lady it shall go hard with thee." 

"Peace, good mountebank, I did but utter the truth that was 
in my heart. San Paolo be my witness that did ye but find the 
stout Count Leonardo in his cups, sheer from the castle's 
topmost battlements would he hurl ye all! Alack-a-day, the 
good Lord Luigi reigns not here in these sad times." 

"The good Lord Luigi?" 

"Aye, none other, please your worship. In his day, the poor 
rejoiced in plenty and the rich he did oppress; taxes were not 
known; the fathers of the church waxed fat upon his bounty; 
travelers went and came, with none to interfere ; and whosoever 
would, might tarry in his halls in cordial welcome, and eat his 
bread and drink his wine withal. But woe is me! two and 
forty years ago the good Count rode away to fight for Holy 
Cross, and many a year has flown since word or token was 
had of him. Men say his bones lie bleaching in the fields of 
Palestine." 

"And now?" 

"Now! God 'a mercy, the cruel Leonardo lords it in the cas- 
tle. He wrings taxes from the poor; he robs all travelers that 
journey by his gates; he spends his days in feuds and murders, 
and his nights in reve! and debauch; he roasts the fathers of the 
church upon his kitchen spits, and enjoyeth the same, calling it 
pastime. These thirty years Luigi's countess hath not been 
seen by any one in all this land, and many whisper that she 
pines in the dungeons of the castle for that she will not wed 
with Leonardo, saying her dear lord still liveth, and that she 
will die ere she prove false to him. They whisper likewise that 
her daughter is a prisoner as well. Nay, good jugglers, seek 
ye refreshment otherwheres. 'Twere better that ye perished in 
a Christian way than that ye plunged from off yon dizzy tower. 
I give ye good day." 

"God keep ye, gentle youth — farewell." 

But heedless of the peasant's warning, the players moved 
straightway toward the castle. 

Word was brought to Count Leonardo that a company of 
mountebanks besought his hospitality. 

" 'Tis well. Dispose of them in the customary manner. Yet 
stay! I have need of them. Let them come hither. Later, cast 
them from the battlements — or — how many priests have ye on 
hand?" 

"The day's results are meagre; good my lord. An abbot and 
a dozen beggarly friars is all we have." 

"Hell and furies! Is the State going to secede? Send 
hither the mountebanks. Afterward, broil them with the 
priests." 

The robed and close-cowled harlequins entered. The grim 
Leonardo sate in state at the head of his council-board. Ranged 
up and down the hall on either hand stood near a hundred men- 
at-arms. 

"Ha, villains!" quoth the Count, "what can ye do to earn 
the hospitality ye crave?" 

"Dread lord and mighty — crowded audiences have greeted 
our humble efforts with rapturous applause. Among our body 
count we the versatile and talented Ugolino; the justly cele- 
brated Rodolpho; the infant phenomenon, Sig. Beppo; the 
Palestine Pet — Zelina; the gifted and accomplished Rodrigo. 
The management have spared no pains and expense " 

" 'Sdeath ! What can ye do ! Curb thy prating tongue." 

"Good my lord — in acrobatic feats, in practice with the dumb 
bells, in balancing and ground and lofty tumbling, are we 



versed; and sith your highness asketh me, I venture here to 
publish that in the truly marvelous and entertaining zampil- 

laerostation " 

"Gag him! Throttle him! Body of Bacchus! Am I a dog 
that I am to be assailed with pollysyllabled blasphemy like 
this? But hold! Lucrezia, Isabel, stand forth! Sirrah, behold 
this dame, this weeping wench. The first I marry, within the 
hour; the other shall dry her tears or feed the vultures. Thou 
and thy vagabonds shall crown the wedding with thy merry- 
makings. Fetch hither the priest!" 

The dame sprang toward the chief player. 

"Oh, save me!" she cried; "save me from a fate far worse 
than death! Behold these sad eyes, these sunken cheeks, this 
withered frame ! See thou the wreck this fiend hath made, and 
let thy heart be moved to pity! Look upon this damsel; note 
her wasted form, her halting step, her bloodless cheeks where 
youth should blush and happiness exult in smiles! Hear us and 
have compassion! This monster was my husband's brother. 
He, who should have been our shield against all harm, hath 
kept us shut within the noisome dungeons of his castle, for, lo, 
these thirty years — for what crime! None other than that I 
would not belie my troth, root out my strong love for him who 
marches with the legions of the Cross in Holy Land, for 0, he 
is not dead! and wed with him! Save us, 0, save thy perse- 
cuted suppliants!" 

She flung herself at his feet and clasped his knees. 

"Ha! ha! ha!" shouted the brutal Leonardo. "Priest, to 
thy work !" and he dragged the weeping dame from her refuge. 
"Say, once for all will you be mine? — for by my halidom, that 
breath that uttereth thy refusal shall be thy last on earth!" 

"Nev-er!" 

"Then die!" and the sword leaped from its scabbard. 

Quicker than thought, quicker than the lightning's flash, fifty 
monkish habits disappeared, and fifty knights in splendid ar- 
mor stood revealed! Fifty falchions gleamed in air above the 
men-at-arms, and brighter, fiercer than them all, flamed Ex- 
calibur aloft, and cleaving downward, struck the brutal Leo- 
nardo's weapon from his grasp! 

Count Luigi bound his usurping brother hand and foot. The 
practiced knights from Palestine made holiday sport of carv- 
ing the awkward men-at-arms to chops and steaks. The vic- 
tory was complete. Happiness reigned. Everybody married 
somebody else! 

"But what did they do with the wicked brother?" 

"Oh, nothing — only hanged him on that iron hook I was 
speaking of. By the chin." 

"How?" 

"Passed it up through into his mouth." 

"How long?" 

"Couple of years." 

"Count Luigi — is he dead?" 

"Six hundred and fifty years ago, or such a matter." 

"Splendid legend — drive on." 



A SUN-DIAL. 



Each morning sees my task begun, 
Each evening finds my duty done : 

The shadows on my dial show 

Only the joyous hours that go 
Along the pathway of the sun. 
Only the happy hours I write, 
Between the daybreak and the night : 

My records all are golden rhyme; 

I am the troubadour of Time, 
And all my songs are of delight. 

— Frank Dempster Sherman in Scribnefs. 

Doris was radiant over a recent addition to the family, 

and rushed out of the house to tell the news to a passing neigh- 
bor. "Oh, you don't know what we've got upstairs!" "What is 
it?" "It's a new baby brother!" and she settled back upon her 
heels and folded her hands to watch the effect. "You don't say 
so! Is he going to stay ?" "I guess so"— very thoughtfully; 
"he's got his things off." — Everybody's Magazine. 

Miss Quizz — Have you ridden in Charlie's new auto? 

Mrs. Malaprop — Yes; it was lovely. There was some oscula- 
tion, but it didn't bother me a bit. — Brooklyn Life. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 



OBITUARY. 

Ferdinand L. Vassault, for many years a lead'/ig editorial 
writer and newspaper man of San Francisco, met his death 
July 7th in Washington, where he had lived for a number of 
years. Vassault was one of the examiners connected with the 
Interstate Commerce Commission at the National Capital. He 
was an able worker and rendered valuable service to the gov- 
ernment. He was a graduate of the University of California, 
and was in college with Franklin K. Lane, Attorney Seth Mann, 
William R. Wheeler and other men who since have become 
well known in public life. Prior to going to Washington he was 
connected with the "Argonaut" as an editorial writer, and later 
with the "Bellman," a literary weekly published in Minne- 
apolis. 



The feeling of many men with regard to public office is 

much the same as that which a certain distinguished Frenchman 
had toward the Academy — that group of forty who are called 
"the Immortals." He was asked one day why he did not pro- 
pose his candidacy for the Academy. "Ah," said he, "if I 
applied and were admitted, some one might ask: 'Why is he 
in it?' and I should much rather hear it asked, 'Why isn't he in 
it?'" — Christian Register. 



The dining rendezvous of those who appreciate comfort, 

luxury, impeccable service and the best productions of unex- 
celled table, is at Techau Tavern, Market and Mason streets. 
The atmosphere of quiet enjoyment and satisfaction which pre- 
vails there has made it the most attractive place of its kind in 
San Francisco. Special 50 cent luncheons every day to suit the 
convenience and meet the requirements of shoppers and busi- 
ness men. 



Women suffrage enthusiasts of California should be 

warned of the effort that is being made by the race track gam- 
bling interests of California. Women are being put into the 
field to canvass signatures under one guise or another, and with 
these a second paper is innocently presented to the signee and 
is signed without the full knowledge of the voter. This prac- 
tice is a rank fraud and should be exposed. 



MISS HEADS SCHOOL 

2588 Charming Way, Berkeley, Cal. 

Boarding and day school 

College preparation 

Accredited to college 

25th year, August 20, 1912 
MARY E. WILSON, M. L., Principal 



A. W. Becft 



Alic. BoA 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1625 California Street 



Life Claaaea 
Day and Night 



llluatratlnc 
Sketching 
Painting 



MANZANITA HALL 

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA. 

Makes a specialty of preparing boys and young men for entrance 
to the universities. The location adjacent to Stanford University 
and to Palo Alto, a town of remarkable culture, makes possible a 
school life of unusual advantages and opportunities 

Twentieth year opens Aug. 27, 1912. For catalogue and specific 
information, address 
W. A. SHEDD, Head Maste r. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



DOMINICAN 
COLLEGE 



SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIFORNIA 



& & 



A Boarding School for Young Women, conducted by the Sister* 
of St. Dominic, situated In Magnolia Valley and protected by the 
lofty hills of the Tamalpals Range. Fifty minutes by boat and 
train from San Francisco. Climate unsurpassed for healthfulnest. 
Ideal condition for scholastic work. 

Classical, Scientific and Commercial Courses. Specially organized 
departments of Music, Art and Domestic Economy. Well equipped 
Library and Laboratory. Accredited by the University of California. 



The Raymond Coaching School 

Twelfth Year 

Individual Instruction Only 

Preparation for University Entrance Examinations, 
for West Point, Annapolis and Professional 
Colleges. 

Ten departmental teachers of special training and 
extended experience. 

The chief purpose which the methods of the school 
seek to further: the development in the student 
of the greatest possible mental power. 

Telephone West 2751 
2659 California St San Tranclsco 



PRIVATE INSTRUCTION ONLY 

Shorthand — Typewriting— Bookkeeping 

Munson School of Shorthand 

820 to 827 Whitney Building 

133 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 3671 LUCILE SMITH, Principal 



Miss Harker's School 



PALO ALTO 
CALIFORNIA 



Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year begins August 15th. 
Catalogue upon application. 



HEALDS 

BUSINESS COLLEGE 

425 Mr. Allister St.San Francisco. 
▼ I7COURSES.T 



Each leads to a Lucrative Position 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



25 




mmm 



p^spe 



■■ ■> i \j 



By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

New licenses were issued to the following purchasers of au- 
tomobiles in San Francisco and vicinity for the week ending 
July 20th. The total number of licenses issued for the State 
for the same period was 567. 

REISS-WILSCAM & ROOKS. 31(1 Golden Gate Ave., S. F Loco 

DOUGLAS, B. C, 5S3 Market St., S. F E-M-F 

SAMUEL, ADA, 415 O'Favrell St., S. F Premier 

LANCASTER, C. J.. Alameda Marquette 

ROBBINS. M. H., Alameda Marquette 

VERBA, A. D., Davis and Clay Sts., S. F Cartercar 

SCHMIDT LITHOGRAPH CO., 2d and Bryant sis., s. F. ...Abbott-1 

HODMAN. A. S.. Travelers Ins. Co., S. F White 

REED, E. J.. 3J57 Grove St., S. F Buick 

SW1NK, R. C so-1 San Mat''" Road, Berkeley i 'Ids 

ARMSTRONG, NELLIE A.. 1424 Grove si . Berkeley Reo 

McNEAR, GEO. P., 2 Main St.. Petaluma Federal 

BSBORN, HOMER, 209 Main St., Vallejo Hupp 

WHEELER, E. W„ 3U6H 16th St., S. F Buick 

STONE. FRANK B., 405 Sansome St., S. F Chal rs 

PELTON. S. G., 445 S. Second St.. San .Icise Kissel 

DANNH'NBAUM. E.. 313 Georgia St., Vallejo E-M-F 

BROWN, W. T., 32JS Folsom St.. S. F Winton 

PACIFIC HARDWARE & STEEL Co.. S. F Buick 

AICHEH, G. A.. 1650 Stockton St.. s. F Fires 

SHOW, M. S.. 1235 Pine St., S. F Buiek 

HOWELL, E. E., Rosemont Apartments. S. F Elmore 

MONARCH OIL REFINERY CO., 60 California St., S. F Speedwell 

LEE, .IAS. D., 1508 Guerrero St.. s. F Rambler 

MAYFIELD BREWERY. Mayfield Gramm 

MAJESTIC BOTTLING CO., Ellis and Bledemann Sts., S. F i 

HANSEN & FORSMANN, 2022 15th SI.. S. F damn 

COAXES, ALFRED H.. 31 Alvarad,, i;. .ad, Berkeley Premier 

SUCKLING, MRS. A.. 2S 1 1 Woolsey St., Oakland Loco 

KOCH-BYRON & CHASE. 136 W. Santa I 'Inn. St., San Jose Reo 

WISNOM, w. D., 2*: Second Ave., San Mateo Oakland 

PBNLAND, W. B.. 700 Palm Ave., San Jose Brush 

MOORE. GEO. B., 139 W. Si 'ord A\e, Mayfield Chal is 

WALKEY, A. T„ IIS Turk St., S. F Mr. than 

GLUM & PERSICK, Half Moon Buy : Sunset 

HALL, .i. w.. Theatre Hide'., San Jose Franklin 

i.i -cAs, GEORGIA C, 2U. Washington si , Rid id Chalmers 

TAFT, F. W., 1015 Merchants' Ex. Bldg., S. F Knt 

BROWN, C, H., 2137 Pacific Ave., s. F Loco 

BELLS, CHAS. iv. 2416 Pierce si. s F . Cadillac 

C. W. smith COPPER WORKS, L6 Washing SI S. F Reo 

SI 'Hill :Y FLOUR CO., id ii Claj SI . Oal I I' 

GROVE, II ii. its; di md St., Oakland 

KYLE. W. B., 8021 Claremonl : 

OSTERLOH, WM., Haywards Maxwell 

LIVINGSTON. J. P., Sausallto Kline 

MIANO. JOHN N., 22 s. Tenth St., San Joa Little 

MARCELLUS B 1AM CO 3. 1 Hupp 

GALLOWAY LITHOGRAPH CO., 616 Howard St., s. F Hupp 

i.'i.i ii i] i, .IAS, i... 2" . n i Bldg , S i' S 

STEEKE, .1. E„ 180 Jessie si . s, P E-M-F 

SPERRY FLOUR CO., 343 San .mi, St., S. F 

I .i i\ BRBERT C, I'd 1 1 and Division Sts., S. F 

BE1 1 - SCi '. '■'.. M' '■ i '"". s. F " 

ii m ;i E, WM. E., 1639 i lalll'ornia St., s. F Reo 

l. i;i SE, FRED W.. 1789 Ninth \ s !■' Buick 

ii CR \ckhx. i ir, w . i; 14th and Kirkham Sts.. Oakland 

Dl i\\ I 'El I., l I [i IS S i ' '.a- lino 

SI] \\\. G. C.| Sun Mat. o KlB 

GERDES HERMAN, 324 Fourth St., San Rafael : 

ii , L. ft TEL. CO.. S. F Buick 

McDERMOTT, ll J., Snnol 

HIKSCll ll s .-.'.■. i Sanl t.. San Jose Little 

ARNOLD, ll'. 179 X First St., San .ins, 

KIRK, 1. II.. 1100 Brvant St. Palo Alto 

l'El.l, HUMAN. X. A. 17" San Augustine Si 

ant Ave., s. F " niton 

! F 

' r MRS, J., 760 Elizabeth St., S. F ' 

C W.IFi 'KM \ BARRE1 , CO 

MALONE ! ' '• 1 Stnvens-Dury. a 

31 . s. F 1 

LYON. R. T„ 41" Montgomers St., s. F 

S1SS"X C C 2186 lo - ' ' ' 

ROBINSON, 1 

LEFJ «■■ S. F 

JUSSEN. ET>\\ \KI ■ Post St., S. F ^ 

HAL] J. F ' . , ,. 

h-M-I- 

-lli- i .\ F.l - six.; CO., Oakland 

t 

: 

UI'ERTZ Cl 

Ivla and Addison Sts.. 1: 

Regal 

Moon 

.Hupp 

: Duryea 

ihima 

RYAN. H. J.. Stai ■■• 

a'RGH I. P.. IS-'S Jerrold " ... S F ' 

' 

FOARD ' 

>■ x Hup S 

lakland Oakland 

LESTER, JAN o Bancroft W ay, Berkelej .Buick 



INS, A. W., 1811 Bonita Ave., Berkeley 

1 1 AX. M P., Bi resford, Belmont P. O i 

VS., 16 N San Pedro St. San Jose Hupn 

.X. c. k,, 2423 Larkln St.. s. F 

i-SI. S. F 

RTY. E. W. ro 

Ito 

S, WM., So. 11 

» * * 

The question to what extent an em- 
Chauffeur's Authority ployer is legally responsible for the 
To Bind His Employer, acts performed and contracts made 
by his chauffeur is one which af- 
fects all automobilists who employ drivers, according to Clin- 
ton B. Marshall, quoting from Huddy's work on the Law of Au- 
tomobiles. There are probably more court decisions concerning 
the owner's liability for his chauffeur's conduct in driving than 
regarding any other legal aspect of motoring. The following 
propositions have now been definitely established : 

1. The chauffeur is an employee and a servant of his em- 
ployer while engaged in the business for which he is hired. 

2. He is employed to operate and drive his employer's car 
only at such times and to such places as designated by his em- 
ployer personally, or his agent, either expressly or by impli- 
cation. 

3. Any driving for the chauffeur's own pleasure at times or 
to places not authorized expressly or by implication by the em- 
ployer does not constitute driving for the employer, and an in- 
jury occurring while so driving will not bind the employer. 

4. In order to hold the owner of an automobile responsible for 
an alleged injury caused by any other person driving his 
machine, the relation of master and servant must have existed 
at the time. 

5. The borrower of an automobile cannot make the person 
loaning it responsible for the former's conduct or acts. There 
is no relation of master and servant in such a case. There is 
no hiring. 

Although as a general proposition it is laid down that an 
owner of an automobile may not be held legally liable for the 
acts of the chauffeur which are committed when not engaged in 
the owner's business, it is, however, difficult to determine in 
every case when a chauffeur does not act for his employer. He 
is hired to drive the automobile and to care for it, but the terms 



AUTOMOBILE OWNERS 
Attention!! 

For several years past due to our Factory not 
being able to supply the demand we have not 
been in a position to offer Kelly-Springfield tires 
to the general public. The Kelly-Spingfield Tire 
Factory has been enlarged several times during 
the past few years and we are now receiving 
shipments of Kelly-Springfield automobile tires 
from Akron, Ohio. We now have a limited 
supply of tires and tubes in stock at our San 
Francisco Branch and for this reason we are in- 
viting the Public to call at our place of business 
to inspect the quality of our automobile tires. 
There is perhaps no other automobile tire on the 
market that can equal the Kelly-Springfield 
quality. As you probably know, the Kelly- 
Springfi Id Tire people manufactured the first 
solid rubber carriage tire that was placed on the 
market. 

Our tires are guaranteed to give better service and 
more mileage than any other tire on the market. 

Kelly -Springfield Tire Co. 

489 Golden Gate Avenue 

Phone Market 1542 S«n Francisco. C»l. 

MR. CHAS. W. FLINT, Pacific Coaat Maoager 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 



of his employment, generally speaking, authorize him to drive 
only as directed. In other words, he has no independent action 
of his own volition. If he is to drive with authority to a certain 
city, for example, he must have either express or implied per- 
mission to do so. If he orders supplies for the automobile he 
must also have similar authority. 

The owner of an automobile is not necessarily liable for an 
injury committed by his chauffeur while driving the automobile 
with the owner's consent, if the chauffeur was driving at the 
time for his own pleasure or business. This is what the Appel- 
late Division of the Supreme Court of New York has just de- 
cided, and decided correctly, in the case of Cunningham vs. 
Castle, reported in the New York Law Journal of Monday, July 
20, 1908, 127 N. Y. App. Div. 580, 111 N. Y. S. 1057. The 
owner had loaned the chauffeur his automobile for a certain 
length of time, during which time an injury was inflicted on the 
public highways. The opinion of the court is based upon the 
theory that there was no relationship of master and servant 
when the injury was inflicted. The consent to use the machine 
did not make the owner liable. The case was the same as any 
other where a person loans one vehicle to another. Although 
the court in this case did not cite the authorities, there are, 
nevertheless, two decisions in this country, which hold that the 
owner of an automobile cannot be held legally responsible for 
the acts of a borrower. 

Just exactly under what circumstances an owner is respon- 
sible for the acts of his chauffeur, and when authority, or at 
least the presumed relation of master and servant, does or does 
not exist is a question not often easy to decide. 

The legal doctrine of agency is playing an important part in 
everything that has to do with the automobile, and our courts 
are now frequently called upon to determine the rights and lia- 
bilities of parties arising out of the acts of the agents. The 
vital question, on which every controversy hinges, is: "Was 
the party acting as an agent or servant at the time he committed 
the unlawful act or made or broke the contract?" 

The most important relation of agency (so far as the automo- 
bile industry is concerned) is that of employer and chauffeur. 
The latter manages and operates the car, and while so doing ren- 
ders his employer liable for whatever authority from the owner ; 
but when a chauffeur is or is not acting according to authority is 
a matter difficult to determine. For example, a chauffeur takes 
the owner's car and drives for his own pleasure. While so driv- 
ing he runs over a pedestrian. Is the owner liable? The courts 
have held that in such a case the employer is not liable, since 
at the time the chauffeur did not act for his employer. It is also 
held that an injured party who attempts to hold the owner of 
an automobile liable for damages done by a chauffeur must al- 
lege and prove that the employee acted for the master. There 
are a large number of decisions to this effect, although in Mis- 
souri the contrary is held. The doctrine there is that the injured 
party need not allege and prove that the chauffeur was acting 
for his employer, but that the law would presume that a chauf- 
feur acts according to instructions while driving the car of an- 
other. There may be cases where it is doubtful whether one 
occupies the relation of chauffeur to the owner of the machine. 
In order to hold an owner liable the relation of master and ser- 
vant must exist, and unless this relation is established, there 
can be no liability on the part of the owner. For instance, 
where an owner lets out his car to another on commission, the 
other party using it in a livery business and being himself the 
driver, it is held that there is no liability on the part of the 
owner for the acts of the driver, since there is no relation of 
master and servant between them. 

As to whether a chauffeur is such of his employer that he may 
bind his employer for certain current supplies purchased, there 
can be but little doubt. It is the general custom for chauffeurs 
to purchase supplies and parts, and a dealer or manufacturer 
has the right to presume that a chauffeur acts for his principal 
in making such contracts. For a chauffeur to obtain a secret 
commission on the sale of supplies or parts to the detriment of 
his employer is clearly illegal under both common and statu- 
tory law. It is his duty to give to his employer every possible 
advantage to be gained from any transaction connected with his 
employment. 

The phrase "unauthorized use of automobiles" is very com- 
prehensive, and includes many acts which are not only civilly 
wrong, warranting an action for damages, but which are crimi- 
nal ; as, for example, driving without a license or without num- 



bers, violating the speed regulations, etc. However, what we 
wish to discuss here is that use which is not strictly criminal and 
prohibited by statutory enactment, but which violates the com- 
mon law right of the owner of the vehicle, constituting an inva- 
sion of his right of property. The law books call it a conversion 
of the property belonging to another. 



"Let's be something or do something." The motto that has 
been turned to the wall by the automobile owners and the deal- 
ers in San Francisco has been dusted and turned face outward. 
There is something stirring. Dame Rumor has chirped a few 
times these same dulcet notes, when there was going to be a 
reunion at Santa Cruz, and games with a frolic in the water. 
Then there was going to be a fine club with a fine club house 
where the world would be entertained in 1915. But the old dame 
only chirped. 

Now, however, it really looks as if there was going to be 
something doing. J. J. Doyle, one of the old stand-bys on auto- 
mobile row, has been given a dream powder of some kind, and 
while he was not thinking, has been handed a splendid prize 
package of getting up a run for the motorists. After the event 
is over, Doyle will wake up when the anvil chorus beats its 
merry roundelay. 

But it is too late for Doyle to back out. 

Doyle has planned an automobile run to Highland Springs 
to be held on Saturday, August 3d. A special boat will be pro- 
vided to carry the automobile owners over early enough, so that 
the Springs can be reached early in the afternoon. 

A stop will be made at Santa Rosa for luncheon, where the 
Mayor of the city will welcome the motorists. 

Those in control of the toll road over the Pieta Grade have 
lifted the toll for those who take part in the run. 

Sunday will be spent visiting Lakeport, Clear Lake, the Blue 
Lakes, Laurel Dell and the many other delightful places in this 
most enjoyable section. 

The hotel management at Highland Springs has thrown open 
the hotel grounds, and special rates have been made to those 
who take part in the event. 

There will be a blind handicap. Those who are competing 
will, on Saturday evening, come before the committee, and 
write a handicap on a card. This will be put into an envelope 
and sealed. After all the handicaps have been made they will 
be drawn by the contestants, and the nearest to the specified 
time will be declared the winner. Several very fine prizes have 
been offered. The new owner who has just bought his first car 
to-day will have an equal chance with the oldest expert. It will 
be purely a matter of luck who is declared the winner. 

Discussing the run recently, Doyle said: "I believe this tour 
will be the best attended gathering of motorists ever held in 
California. The route is an easy one, and the roads all the way 
are in fine shape. The Pieta toll road is the best mountain road 
in the country to-day. The hotel people have promised many 
special features, and I am sure that all who participate will have 
a good time. Entry blanks, which are free, will be out within 
the next day or two, and I suggest that the motorists demanding 
them will return them quickly in order that I may send them 
their credentials for free passage over the Pieta toll road, and 
to arrange for adequate accommodations at the hotels. A letter 
addressed to me in care of the Fireman's Fund Company will 
receive prompt attention." 

Runs of this nature are the best proposition that can be de- 
vised, for the reason that they greatly help the cause of good 
roads. If it is found that there are bad roads on the way to any 
rendezvous, it is a certainty that the motorist will not return. 
Trades people realize the value of visiting motorists, and as 
they are always the live ones in any town or city, it is certain 
that where bad roads exist the conditions will be changed. 

If the motorists don't get together, like on this event, the 
trades people do not have a chance to judge of their value. 

It is now up to the automobile owner and dealer to keep Doyle 
dreaming. They should turn out in full force, so that when 
this event is over it will be such a success that he will try it 
again in another direction. 

* * * 

Direct branches of automobile factories have met with favor 
from the buying public of the Pacific Coast, as can be seen in 
the splendid business enjoyed by the Oakland Motor Company 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



during the three months that the company has had a branch 
here at 542 Van Ness avenue. 

This concern has set a mark not only for big sales in new 
cars, but has also established a record for quick sales when it 
disposed of many of the demonstrating cars. 

The company, when it opened its branch in San Francisco, 
brought a new idea of having a demonstrating car of every 
model that it made. A buyer had a chance to ride in and try 
out the particular style of car that he was trying to buy. He 
has had a chance to test every little peculiarity of the model he 
was investigating. There has been nothing left to the imagina- 
tion. The record of three hundred cars sold in the short time 
that the Oakland factory branch has been established shows 
that the buyer appreciates progressive methods. 

The company has not limited its endeavors to the local trade, 
but has extended its energies out into the country, where to-day, 
throughout the Coast, the Oakland cars are as fully well known 
as they are in San Francisco. 

"We have disposed of more cars than we expected during the 
first three months here," s^ys Henry L. Hornberger, "and our 
plans for the coming season will call for an even larger dis- 
tribution of the well known Oakland cars. The entire Western 
territory is remarkably good for the automobile business, and 
we intend to make arrangements for increasing the sales of our 
lines of cars throughout this field for the 1913 season." 

* * * 

"The radiator on an automobile is a husky looking affair, 
but the motor car owner should remember that, like some child- 
ren, it has been raised a pet, and should be carefully handled," 
says E. Stewart, the head of the E. Stewart Automobile Com- 
pany, agents for the S. G. V. cars. 

"Whenever it is necessary to back a car into place by pushing 
it, about the first thing that some one will choose as the most 
accessible point to which his power may be applied is that of 
the cap on the top of the radiator. This is a poor practice, for 
there are a number of cases where the filler caps or pipes have 
been broken away, and caused the person pushing them painful 
injury. 

"One case in particular is remembered in which the filler 
cap gave way, and the person who was pushing upon it seemed 
to be taken with a mad desire to bite a chunk out of the top 
of the cooler. 

"Aside from the physical injury to the operator, considerable 
harm in the way of leaks has been done to many radiators by 
pushing on them to move the vehicle backwards." 

* * * 

Norman De Vaux, the head of the Reo-Pacific Company, has 
returned from the Reo and Little factories. The Reo factory is 
in splendid shape. They are shipping the 1913 models to their 
different agents. The first of these models were on the local 
salesroom floor this week. The new Reo is finished in the regu- 
lar black body with gray running gear. An owner, however, 
can get them finished in Brewster green or gray bodies. De 
Vaux states that the 1913 agency contract will be out on August 
1st for signatures. 

The Reo-Pacific Company has sold the last two of the 1912 
models of Reos, and the force has been giving its attention to 
the several carloads of Little "20's" that have been arriving 
the past week. 

F. H. Holmes, the Little agent in San Jose, has made the 
Garden City a Little town. Since the first of these new popu- 
lar cars reached the Coast he has sold ten of them in San Jose. 

Of the fourteen Little cars received last week, eight of them 
were taken by F. H. Holmes of San Jose, two by A. Zeller of 
Napa, one by P. Ritchie of Merced, one by J. B. McCutchen of 
Healdsburg, one by F. M. Barrett of Corning, and one by Philo 
Grabt of St. Helena. 

* * • 

The automobile owners and dealers of the Northwest are 
again turning their attention to breaking records. The latest 
record was smashed at Seattle. Henry D. McCoy, the head of 
Chanslor & Lyons Motor Supply Company, has just received the 
following letter from W. A. Avery, the manager of the Seattle 
branch. Avery writes: "Roland P. Rice has relinquished his 
hold on the Chanslor & Lyons trophy, at any rate for the time 
being, to Leonard McClure, who lowered the former's time from 
Portland to Seattle by twenty-three minutes, making the run 
in a Ford car in eight hours and one-quarter. The Chanslor & 



Lyons cup having now been won three times and lost twice, it 
has become a trophy of considerable importance in the North- 
west. That there is still an opportunity to lower McClure 's 
record and wrest the cup from him, is suggested by the fact that 
he suffered delay at the hands of an astounded policeman, who 
caused his arrest for exceeding the speed limits. A few min- 
utes at least can be knocked off his record by keeping a sharper 
lookout for the officer of the law." 

* * * 

Mr. A. H. Howe, secretary and treasurer of the Goldfield 
Consolidated Mines Company, of Goldfield, Nev., accompanied 
by his son, arrived in San Francisco last week, having motored 
from Goldfield to this point in his Chalmers "36," which he pur- 
chased two months ago from the Pioneer Automobile Company, 
the Chalmers agents. "I have driven the machine 5,000 miles 
since I bought it," said Mr. Howe, "and I have experienced no 
trouble of any kind with it. From Goldfield to Los Angeles we 
made the trip via Independence, Owens Valley and Mojave, 
this being the projected transcontinental auto route from Salt 
Lake westward. The roads from Goldfield to Independence, 
over the White Mountains, are excellent. From Independence 
to Mojave the roads are in poor condition, owing to the heavy 
teaming, incident to the aqueduct construction. These teams 
are heavily loaded with cement, and cut the roads up pretty 
badly. From Mojave we proceeded to Los Angeles, through 
the Mint Canyon. This road is fairly good, though much longer 
than other routes. The shortest route is via the San Francis- 
quito Canyon. This canyon has fifty-six fords, and the road 
is also badly cut up by aqueduct teams. Los Angeles people 
who are familiar with the roads say that the preferable route — 
though one little used — is via the Bouquet Canyon from Eliza- 
beth Lake to Saugus; it is not a signed road. From Los An- 
geles we came to San Francisco via the Coast route, and found 
the roads only fair. The worst stretch is from Santa Barbara 

to Los Olivos." 

* * * 

Following the announcement of the direct factory branch of 
the Haynes Automobile Company, F. W. Hauger has been ap- 
pointed manager of their Oakland branch at 205 Twelfth street. 
The Haynes people have increased their facilities for taking 
care of owners in their transbay territory, with factory men in 
their service department, and with their new and spacious quar- 
ters, nothing has been overlooked to still advance the well 
known reputation of the Haynes cars. They want to impress 
all owners and prospective purchasers that their Oakland or- 
ganization is a direct branch and not an agency. 

Hauger has had three and one-half years' factory experience 
in all departments, as well as three years on the Coast, and al- 
ways has in mind the extreme satisfaction of all owners. In 
speaking of the outlook for the coming year, he says : "It will 
not be a question of selling the Haynes line, but of the factory 
being able to take care of the demand. They are branching out 
into the foreign field, and the direct factory branch idea in this 
country has made the Haynes car greatly in demand, for owners 
as well as prospective purchasers have come to realize that it 
is the only source through which they can purchase cars and be 

protected for the life of their guarantee. 

* * * 

The Normandin-Campen Carriage Company, of San Jose, 
who have taken the agency for the Flanders electric cars for 
San Jose territory, have found it not only practicable but de- 
sirable to run their electrics overland to San Jose. This sets 
a new mark for electric efficiency. A year or so ago no one 
would think of touring to San Jose in an electric car. Mr. Cam- 
pen, who is in San Francisco for a few days, made his initial 
run last Saturday, leaving here at 5 :45 p. m„ and arriving at 
his place in San Jose at 8 :45 p. m. "Such a run in an electric 
car," said Mr. Campen, "is an experience both novel and de- 
lightful, as the noise and vibration of the gasoline vehicle is 
totally lacking, and we glided along as though in a boat, and 
on arriving at San Jose, found we had used only 55 per cent of 

our charge." 

» * * 

Motorist — Shall I pass a hotel on this road where I can 

get something to drink? Tramp — Hanged if I know, sir. 

I'm blamed sure I wouldn't. — Maclean's Magazine. 

* • • 

The mere fact that a camel can go seven days without 

a drink has nothing to do with the radiator on your car. 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 



Worth While 
Your Attention 

Regal Model T "25" Underslung Touring Car 

UNDER a thousand dollars — 
Twenty - five horse power- 
Comfortably seating five pas- 
sengers. A veritable challenge to 
competition. An "Underslung" 
with all the advantages of "safety," 
"economy," "beauty," "accessibility," 
"comfort" this costly construction 
assures. 

A Touring Car that will amaze you by 
its ability, its flexibility and its absolute 
sufficiency for any and every purpose 
—speed— endurance— hill climbing. 

Compare it— Match it— Value against 
Value. 

Let the car do justice to the good 
things we haven't said about it. 

Some Specifications: 



Motor, 25 H. P., 3%x4'/ 2 Inches; 
Wheel Base, 106 Inches; Mag- 
neto and Batteries (dual Igni- 
tion); Transmission (Selective) 
Highest Grade Nickel Steel, 3 
speeds forward, one reverse; 
Morgan & Wright Tires 32x3'/ 2 



inches; Standard Equipment, 
Five Lamps; Generator: Horn; 
Complete Tool Equipment (Fold- 
ing Glass Windshield and Mo- 
hair Top and Top Boot, $50 ex- 
tra.) 



S950 

The Regal "25" Underslung Touring Car 

REGAL MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

Automobile Manufacturers, DETROIT, MICH. 
San Francisco and Oakland Agents 

Frank O. Renstrom Company 




(THE HOUSE OF SERVICE) 



Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves. 
Twelfth and Jackson Sts. 



San Francisco, Cal a 
Oakland, Cat. 



Dealers Everywhere 



The season of 1913 in the automobile trade is now at hand, 
and from the present indications, it is going to be a record in the 
history of the industry. There is no question but what many 
of the builders will bring out their new models much more re- 
fined and extensively equipped. The tendency is to add more 
to the equipment instead of lowering the price, and this policy 
is likely to be followed out the coming season. 

Wonderful changes have taken place since the first motor car 
was offered for sale to the public. The history of the automo- 
bile in time to come will read like the story of an over-worked 
imagination. However, the great advancement of the making 
of making motor cars is history — history that can be traced 
through the publications of the times. It is here that the News 
Letter becomes the record of the automobile on the Pacific 
Coast. 

The San Francisco News Letter is now in its 56th year, and 
during all that time it has been the first to publish the news of 
the day. In keeping with this policy the editor was the first 
to publish the news and the doings of the automobile world and 
trade in a weekly on the Coast. 

The public has appreciated this fact by the way they have 
supported this publication. They have not only supported it 
by their continued subscription, which has run the lifetime of 
many, but they have found that the class of advertisers to be 
found in the News Letter are the most profitable and satisfac- 
tory to trade with. The result has been that for over this half of 
a century the reader and the advertiser have been brought to- 
gether through the columns of this weekly in a way that has 
proved of mutual benefit to each. 

The reason that such results are to be obtained through the 
News Letter is from the fact that during the time the first issue 
came off of the press the weekly has been in the family of the 
present proprietor. This is a point that cannot be passed over 
by the advertiser. He must realize that the weekly must have 
been a paying property, or else it would have changed hands 
or gone out of existence long ago. 

Advertising is what pays the man that owns a publication, 
but he cannot get it without his publication gives results, and 
results can only be obtained through a large circulation. It is 
here that the News Letter is showing, and has shown, its great 
worth. It has and always has had the greatest circulation of 
any of the weeklies on the Pacific Coast. 

When the motor car came before the public it was taken up 
by the editor of this paper in a way that commanded the atten- 
tion of the owner, dealer and enthusiast. The result has been 
that it is acknowledged to be the one medium where the news 
of the day first appears, and is sought and read by every 
motorist. 

* * * 

The division between the Henderson and Cole forces of In- 
dianapolis has now been completed, and hereafter each of these 
motor car makers will operate its own factory and sales de- 
partment entirely independent of each other. Mr. R. P. Hen- 
derson has disposed of his interest in the Cole plant, and has 
discontinued all active interest in the Cole sales. 

From the inception of the Cole, that car has been marketed 
by the Henderson Motor Sales Company, but the demand for 
a popular-priced car among the dealers has been so insistent 
that Mr. R. P. Henderson is building a car in response to that 

demand. The popular-priced car is called the Henderson. 

* * * 

The electric vehicle is taking a firm hold on San Francisco. 
The latest is the placing of electric coupes in the rent service 
by the Guarantee Battery Company, with their exclusive elec- 
tric garage. These are obtainable at all hours by those who 
desire the more refined taxicab. 

Particular attention is called to the fact that the electric coupe 
service differs vastly from that of the taxicab. In using the 
electric coupe you do so as though it were your own private car; 
there is not the usual rush and tear as there is with a taxicab, 

the cars being noiseless, odorless and easy riding. 

* # * 

George P. Moore, Coast manager of the Monogram Oil 
branch, has just issued a telephone directory card giving the 
telephone numbers of all those interested in the automobile 
business. It is one of the most complete automobile direc- 
tories that has been issued. The Monogram people are giving 
these cards away from their headquarters at 491 Golden Gate 
avenue, or 516 Second street. 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



VELIE MOTOR CARS, 1912 



■-^ 



i i I is no such thing 

■ '■■■! \ a in.- i. .1 in.- nei thai Vell< Motoi Cai an b led 



■ are like ev< ommodtty, In thai popuiai 

directed wort and bj giv Ing the i 
i in the automobile Industry. 

No description, however complete, can depict the ease of operation, i accession! tj ol parts, and strength of materials which, In 
Velie M i Cars, represenl years ol bxj erli nee and trial, and all thai s good In Motor Car Manufacture, 

THE VELIE in HAS MORE HORSEPOWER THAN A.w CAK 01 EQ1 \i, PRICE ,\i i mslom i re not alone responslbl< foi 

this, but equally as well are the large valves and tappets, special Limmg and high-grade workmanship. 

[T is THE BEST HILL CLIMBER IN AMERICA 

The \ elie 40 has never been defeated by any competitor In a hill climbing contest. A demonstration will easllj provi this i lalm. 

MOTOR IS ABSOLUTELY QUIET. 

No power was sacrificed to obtain silence. Let us show you the advanced v&tve tappel design that guarantees a longer continual 

silence than can be obtained on any other car, 

VELIE 40 is PROM 200 TO 500 LB. LIGHTER THAN ALL COMPETITORS, as a motor efficiency ol 80 lb. per horsepower as com- 
pared to an efficiency of from 90 t<> 115 lb. per horsepower of competitors. You do not need to be an expert motorist to appreciate the 
great saving this lighter weight accomplishes, both in the matter of tires and gasoline. 

IT HAS THE SMOOTHEST ACTING CLUTCH TO BE FOUNl> ON ANY CAR. No car selling Tor less than $3,600 uses (his expen- 
sive type of dry plate clutch, has several patented features that make it easier to adjust than any other clutch. 

THE PULL FLOATING riMKEN REAR AXLE PREVENTS ANY TROUBLE PROM BROKEN AXLE SHAFTS OR STRIPPED 
DIFFERENTIAL GEARS. 

The L910 Velie was the first moderate priced car to adopt this more expensive axle, but to-day it Is standard on the better ears. In other 
words, Velie ears always represent at least one year's advance In design and construction. 

THE DOI RLE IGNITION SYSTEM RELIEVES THE DRIVERS OF A VELIE 40 OF ANY WORK WHILE TOURING. 

90 per cent of motor troubles are traceable to Ignition. The Velie 10 has two independent systems, employing 8 plugs, which furnish a 
reserve system In case of emergency, 

VELIE MOTOR VEHICLE COMPANY, Moline, 111. 

AGENCIES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES 

AUTO SALES COMPANY, san francisco 



MAX L. ROSENFELD, President 



Service Dept., 419 Larkin Street 



418 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 



Firestone 

Tires and Demountable Rims 




THE sure service com- 
bination, not only speci- 
fied, but demanded by 
a rapidly growing number of car 
owners who know full value. 

Firestone Smooili Trend 

Tires, because of the highest 

percentage of pure Up-River 

Fine P;na Rubber in them — 

because of their sturdiness of 

the expert know-how of 

their carefully inspected building 

— are unquestioned leaders by a 

big margin. 

Firestone N«n -Skid Tires, 

with over-built security against 
road slipping, and in-built strain- 
resisting strength — hold the car 
firmly on the road. 

1* i n'sionc Quirk Dr-tnr liable 
DetnmuidiMe RiittN, alone have 
passed experiment to sure accomplish- 
ment. Moisture proof, they protect 
the tire from decay. 

Simple, a wrench removes the rim, a screw- 
driver the tire, whether tim is on or off ;he wheel. 

They Cost More To Build 
They Cost Less To Use 

THE FIRESTONE TIRE t& RUBBER CO., Akron, Ohio 

"America's Largest Exclusive Tire and Rim Makers" 

Van Ness and Fulton Streets, San Francisco 



r\ 



WHEN BUYING 

RAJAH SPARK PLUCS 

"INSIST ON THE GENUINE" 

Don't accept cheap imitations — spark plugs similar 

in appearance but made of cheap material 

and construction. 

SEE THAT THE SHELL AND PORCELAIN IS STAMPED 

" RAJAH " 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS. 

Hughson & Merton, nc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 



RYRBC 



PRICE 
$3.00 

$3.50 (Foreign) 




Saves 10 to 25 per cent gasolene Fils 
intake pipe. Spins around at great speed 
and "mixes the mixture." Attached in five 
minutes. Don't have to disturb engine. 
Gyrex increases power and flexibility, snap 
and smoothness of motor. 

THE ROYAL EQUIPMENT CO. 

Manufacturers of Raybrsto* Friction Facing, 
Duplex and Raymond Brakes 

Conn. 



Bridgeport, 

CHANSLOR & LYON MOTOR SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

Pacific Coast Distributors 
San Francisco Los Angeles Spokane Fresno Seattle Portlind 



Save Repairs 



Save Money 



Save Trouble 



by replacine" worn nut Bearings with the world re- 
nowned HESS-BRIGHTS. All sizes carried in stock 




Pacific Coast Distributor* 



Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co., Inc. 



Los Angeles 



D. McCOY, Sec. & Treas 
San Francisco Seattle Fresno Portland Spokane 



Rex Metal Cream 

The King Polish 

Not because tt possesses any 
one particular advantage but 
because It possesses all — some 
of them exclusive. 



REX METAL CREAM gives 
maximum service. It goes further 
and gives a more brilliant and dur- 
able polish than any other polish 
on the market. It never scratches 
the metal or Injures the hands 

For Sale By 
ALL JOBBERS 




SHAWMUT 
TIRES 



The Tires that have proved 
BEST 

TANSEY - CROWE 
AUTO SUPPLY 

}4S Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 




A Unique Photograph. 

Above is shown a Spitfire Plug with the likeness of H. A. 
Wattenschmidt reproduced in the center. It will be remem- 
bered that Mr. Wattenschmidt recently visited the Coast, rep- 
resenting the Mosler Companv, who manufacture the Spitfire 

Plug. 

• • • 

The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company of California will 
open its new building at Van Ness avenue and Sutter street this 
Saturday. The management has issued an invitation to friends 
and patrons to participate in this interesting event. It is grati- 
fying to the patrons of "Goodyear Service," as well as to the 
Goodyear firm itself, to note the advance made in recent years. 
Prosperous business concerns help to make a prosperous com- 
munity, and enterprising business men are entitled to the hearty 
support of the public. The Goodyear firm and the Goodyear 
management have the confidence of the public, and a steady 
growth will surely be theirs. 




Renault 

" The Car," 

New Types at New Prices 

NOW ON EXHIBITION AT 

RENAULT FRERES SELLING 
BRANCH, Inc. 



Telephone Market 7038 



116-120 VAN NESS AVENUE 



San Francisco 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



Modern road building is making good use of the motor truck, 
and is introducing a new idea in economical motor traction by 
means of the trailer truck. 

Both truck and trailers are fitted with special quick-dumping 
bodies to facilitate delivery. Two of these road trains hauled 
by Knox trucks have been in active service in Sioux City, 
Iowa, for the past year, and have made a remarkable record in 
road building, having delivered an average of 44V 2 yards of 
material per day, a distance of 3y a miles during a busy season. 
The contractors who use this method of hauling road material 
estimate that it would have required over 10 two-horse teams to 
do this amount of work, while the cost by horses would have 
been twice as much. 

Grades varying from three to seven and one-half per cent 
were negotiated without difficulty, and while the practice of 
hauling such heavy loads by this method on grades puts an 
unreasonable strain upon a motor truck, and is therefore not 
sanctioned by truck manufacturers, it nevertheless illustrates 
the great strength and power of Knox construction. 



"The average buyer of an automobile generally makes the 
fatal mistake, in purchasing a car, in not first considering the 
special work and purpose to which he is going to put the auto," 
says E. Stewart, of the E. Stewart Automobile Company, the 
agents for the S. G. V. cars. 

"A buyer generally figures how many people he is to ac- 
commodate in his automobile. He generally likes a large, 
powerful-looking vehicle, with the appearance of class and 
cost. He generally does not figure where the car is to be used 
the most. One can see many motor cars on the city streets 
being used day after day, whose wheelbase and size are out of 
keeping with the work called for within the city limits. 

"If a man is going to use his car for six days in the week in 
the city and the seventh in the country, he should first and fore- 
most have a city car. The city car must not only be good for 
the city, but must also be suitable for the country. There are 
but few essentially country cars that give satisfaction and ser- 
vice when used in the city." 



TIRE RELIABILITY 

Can Be Secured By Using Woodworth Treads 




Remember, 'Woo.! 
cannot bi 
loose to chad 
the tire. The coll Springs 
IP any 
stretch In the li 
consentient);? i he tires are 
never chafed or h 
Good tiros used 
with Woodworth 
Will last at least three 
times as long as when run 
bare, and at the same 
time the user will be pro- 
tected from punctures 
and skidding. 

Even the best makes of 
tires are not safe from 
injuries when run bare, 
but good tires protected 
by Woodworth Treads 
will be practically proof 
against trouble of any 
kind until the treads wear 
out; for Woodworth 
Treads will give protec- 
tion from wear, cuts, 
bruises and similar in- 
juries, from the action of 
oil, from skidding which 
scuffs off the rubber, and 
in fact from all injuries 
which can be caused to 
the tire by the road or 
objects in the road. 

Send for 1912 catalog 
showing the reduced 
prices and free booklet on 
the Preservation of Tires. 



Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co., Inc. 



Los Angeles 
Seattle 



San Francisco 
Fresno 



Portland 
Spokane 




HARRIS 



TRADE MARK REGISTER 



OILS 

AND GREASES 

"HARRIS TRANS COMPOUND" (DARK) 

is a heavy oil reduced to grease consistency and is a lubricant especially designed for and per- 
fected for TRANSMISSION and DIFFERENTIAL gears and far surpasses any other lubricant 
of its kind, barring none— in actual use it becomes of the fluidity of molasses (no thinner) and 
meshes thoroughly with the gears providing a heavy friction-reducing film between all contact 
surfaces—when the motion stops it drains off from the gears leaving them coated with a thick 
lubricating film, regaining its normal consistency in bottom of case, ever ready to mesh in again 
when motion starts. 

"HARRIS MOTOR GREASE" 

is a cup grease of highest QUALITY especially prepared for compression cups and axle bearings 
and is not affected by climatic conditions and is especially efficient and economical for the 
purposes intended. 

Obtainable of leading dealers and garages or write direct to 

A. W. HARRIS OIL COMPANY 



PACIFIC COAST - 

CHANSLOR & LYON MOTOR SUPPLY CO. inc. 

H. Dv M9COY, Sec. & Tr*as,/ 
LOS ANGERS SAN FRANCISCO; 

SEATTLE \ FRESNO PORTLAND ^SPOKAJsTE 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 



f 

t*~-£i naisaao' .jdjLA 


> 


IV" — 


1 

ft 


7 jr.: ' v -JE-- #i , . - "■■■ --{■ > 
j| wmL^Jj- y - \ -\ 


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a 



The ten Baker electric trucks in this picture were part of a 
line of fifteen Bakers participating in Cleveland's sane Fourth 
of July parade. Twelve Baker 2-ton trucks have been shipped 
to Washington, D. C, where they will be put in service by the 
American Express Company. The Baker Company at the pres- 
ent time holds orders equally as large as the Washington instal- 
lation for seventeen other cities in the United States. These 
orders are additional to the earlier installations of Baker elec- 
tric trucks, which amounted to about a hundred cars in New 
York, Boston and other cities. 

The mammoth orders for express trucks which the Baker 
Company has received up to date are the result of their superior 
demonstration of economy and efficiency over all others with 
which they have been put in direct competition for a period of 
several years. In nearly all the large cities of the country the 
express companies are substituting the electric truck in the 
place of horse and gas car equipment for general city delivery 
service, just as fast as the change can be conveniently made. 

* * * 

No period in the history of the motor truck industry has de- 
veloped such marked improvements in solid tires as those 
noticeable during the past year. The best proof of this state- 
ment is the fact that within the year manufacturers have in- 
creased their mileage guarantees 2,000, and in some instances 
4,000 miles. It now is possible for a truck owner to buy tires 
covered by a guarantee of 10,000 miles, irrespective of the city 
or locality in which they are to be used. 

Commenting on the solid tire situation at the present time, F. 
F. Phillips, of the United States Tire Company, says : 

"Track owners are not only receiving greater mileage guar- 
antees to-day than ever before, but they are getting better all- 
around service. As the tire question is regarded as one of the 
greatest determining factors entering into economic motor truck 
operation, the general effect upon truck development is ap- 
parent." 

* * * 

The Standard Motor Car Company sold to the State Engi- 
neering Department of Sacramento a SO h. p. Stoddard-Dayton 
"Saybrook" roadster, to be used by Mr. Lester H. Gibson, State 
Road Engineer, who has under his supervision the construction 
and maintainance of roads, with the exception of the new con- 
struction being carried on by the State Highway Commission. 
His work carries him into the following counties : Trinity, 
Placer, Sierra, Nevada. Eldorado, Amador, Alpine, Calaveras, 
Tuolumne, Mono, Fresno and Kings. These counties are the 
roughest in the State, necessitating a high-powered car with 
good clearance and equal to any emergency. 

Up to the present time Mr. Gibson has made two trips, regis- 
tering 898 miles, and stated that he is amazed at the ability of 
the car to surmount the obstacles encountered in his work. 

* » * 

The Reliance Automobile Company, through its manager, 
Samuel M. Crim, reports the sale to the city of Berkeley of a 
Knox chassis, on which will be mounted a combination hose 
and chemical body. The company also reports a sale to the 
city of San Jose of a Knox motor-driven combination hose and 
chemical wagon. 



Direct Factory Branch 



ANNO UNCEMENT 




In line with our perfected plans for 
great expansion and to build more 
largely than ever upon the solid foun- 
dation already created by Marion Age, 
Marion Quality and Marion Reputation, we 
announce the opening of our own 

San Francisco Office 



346-348 Golden Gate Avenue 



Phone Franklin 6892 



In charge of our Western District Manager 



Latest Models on Display Experts in charge of Service Department 



Marion Motor Car Company 



Indianapolis, Ind. 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



33 



Mosier 



are the best 
A.R.MoslerfrCo. 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Western Representative 
ALFRED H.COATES 

444 Market Street 

San Francisco 
Cal. 



Light Your Automobile With the 

DYNETO 

Automatic Electric Lighting System 

Guarantee Battery Co. 

Pacific Coast Agents 
630 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 

Call and See Demonstration 



ST. FRANCIS GARAGE 

Under the Management of the 

FRANCIS BROS. AUTO RENTAL CO. 

Announce the Opening of One of the Finest and Most 
Up-To-Date Garages in the City. 

Conveniently located POST STREET, bet. Polk and Van Ness 

Phone Sutter 1O10 

Thoroughly Fire-Proof, Situated in a Class A Building 

Inspection Invited 1912 6-CYLINDER PEERLESS FOR HIRE 



Expert Automobile Washing and Polishing 
By SKILLED Workmen 

Only the very best automobile soaps, 
new and clean sponges and chamois 
used. Day Service a Specialty. 



E. R. WOLFKIEL, v «" Ness Ave. al Golden Gate Ave. 
Phone Franklin 2399 



A. B. C. 

Anti-Puncture Tire Fluid 

will positively stop punctures 
in your tire. Eliminates all 
trouble such as nails, tacks 
and slow leaks. 
Guaranteed not to rot or injure the tube. 'Will 
outlast the tire. Costs $7.50 for tires 34x4 or 
under, or $10.00 for tires over 34x4. 

Call at 606 Van Ness Ave. for Demonstration 
JAMES BOGLE, Sales Manager 




AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States, Canada and Europe 

AETNA INSURANCE CO. 

OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH— 325 California Street. San Francisco 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 

The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and suoDly 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 



SAN MATEO COUNTY. 
CYPRESS LODGE, BELMONT.-Phone Belmont 111. Touring Informa- 
tion. Meals at all hours. Our specialty, steaks and broils, cold lunches. 
Private dining rooms. Thoroughly equipped bar. 
NELSON & JOHNSON. Propr. 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SAN JOSE— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the tounng public. Attractive parlors tor ladles In connec- 
tion. .Mission Front garage next to corner o f First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California. 76 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

SAN JOSE.— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE. Market and St. James 
street. 20.000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire-proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler, Oaklnnd and Hupmo bile agencies. 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE, 443 Emmerson St Tel P A 
333. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries in stock. Gasoline oil 
repairing, lathe work, vulcanizing. Open dav and night. 



PALO ALTO.— LARKIN'S CAFE— Just opened. The only strictly flrst- 
ciass cafe on the Wishbone Route devoted to the patronage of automobile 
Corner of University avenue and The Circle. 



owners and their families. 



GILROY.— "FOWLER'S" GARAGE, North Main St. Phone 1153. Rent 
cars at all hours. Tires and sundries in stock; gasoline, oil, repairing 
lathe work, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 
SANTA CRUZ.— CENTRAL GARAGE; autos for hire; general repairing- 
cars stored. Phone S. C. 446. 25-27-29 Soquel Ave. BEACH GARAGE 
cor. First and Cliff Sts. Phone S. C. 652. Opposite Casa Del Key. E \ 
Noyes &. Son, Props. 

LAKE COUNTY. 
LAKEPORT.— LAKEPORT GARAGE. Vulcanizing, batteries charge*. 
Gasoline and lubricants. First-class machine work. One block from 
Fostofflce. F E. Watkins, Prop. Phone Main 521. 

HIGHLAND SPRI NGS.— Garage, gasoline (30c. per gallon), oils, light 
machine work. Phone, Highland Springs. Special attention to comfort 
of automobilists. Meals al a'i hours. 

SONOMA COUNTY. 
HEALDS8URG— FITCH MOUNTAIN GARAGE. Robinson & Groshong, 
Props. F. L. Robinson. Phone 221 J. Sid Groshong, Phone 220 J; General 
rent and garage seivico. First class auto repair work; full line of supplies. 

GUERNEVILLE.— GUERNEVILLE GARAGE. Automobiles for hire. 
Gasoline, oils and automobile supplies. Main street, Guerneville, in rear 
of City Livi-ry Stables. Phone Main 153. R. N. Tunstall. Prop. 

CLOVERDALE.— WABREN'S GARAGE. Geo. F. Warren, Prop. Fully 
equipped blacksmith and machine shop, Studebaker headquarters; tires In 
stock; supplies and repairs. Upper West St.. Cloverdale. Phone Main 221. 

SANTA ROSA. — Houts Auto Co.. Mendocino Ave., one-half block north 
of Court House. Expert automobile repairing, supplies, tires, oils and 
gasoline. Open day and night. Telephone 527. Agents Overland, Stod- 
dard-Dayton. Kissel-Kar. 

PETALUMA.- PETALUMA CARAGE. Sparks & Murphy, Proprietors. 
General machine work. Supplies, repairing and auto livery; lubricating 
ails and gasoline. Corner Third and C streets. Tel. Petaluma 3. 



EMPIRE TWENTY - FIVE 




THE. LITTLE ARISTOCRAT 




The touring car that looks like a small $5,000.00 car and sells for $850. 
It's the famous Empire Roadster's BIG BROTHER. 




Specifications make the Empire "25." the most aristocratic little car in 
America. Write for details. 




THE EMPIRE AUTOMOBILE CO. 236 Massachusetts St., Indianapolis. USA 





Firestone 

TIRES AND DEMOUNTABLE RIMS 
THE FIRESTONE TIRE AND RUBBER CO. Cor. Van Ness ind Fultoo. Sin Francisco 



MONAMOBILE 

That ONE Best Oil 

251 Minna St., San Francisco. Phone Sutter 2031 



FOR SALE. — 1910 Wlnton Automobile. Perfect condition, fully equipped. 
Warner Speedometer; top; glass front; clock; tire irons; trunk rack; 
Prest-o-L.it* tank; electric and oil lamps; two horns — bulb and electric; 
,wo tire covers; two extra tires; two extra tubes. Address: Owner, 21 
S'utter St. 'Phone Kearny 3594. 

FOR SALE. — Autocar Runabout, with top. lamps and generator. In rood 
condition. Price $160. Apply 21 Sutter street 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 



If you want to prolong the life 
of your engine. 

If you want to eliminate smoke 
and carbon, 
11 /I T"* |— "v T If you want to reduce your oil 

Mo J oKoL <^ nse - 

Use MoToRoL 
''It suits because it doesn't soot" 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 


BEST IN THE 

GOODRICH long RUN 
TIRES 

THE B. F. GOODRICH 
CO., of California 

556-558 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco 


Full factory equipment on all Pack- 
er Tjr~v/— \\ ;cd» ' ards, Oldsmobiles, Coles, Thomas and 
HUUVcK Seven others. Absolutely perfect. 
Full set of four— $14 to $18. Under 
AI1XII IARY SPRINH & compression by heavy loads, roueh 
AUA1L.1AKI arrcirNU Oi roads or bumps. Under all conditions 
ot.^-x^^,^ r^^~ ^r- rides as easv as on asphalt. Impos- 
SHOCK ABSORBER sible to break springs. No competition 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 
Polk and Fulton Sts.. San Francisco 


GOODYEAR F«.ory Br.„cb 

THE GOODYEAR TIRE AND 

NO RIM CUT RUBBER CO. 

TIRF9 161-36! Golden Gate Avenue 
1MXLO San Francisco. Cal. 


EXPERT p - J - KRUG 

426-431 Golden Gate Ave. 

AUTOMOBILE WoodworkinE. Blucksmithine 

and every known repair for 
PAT lMT T T\T f tne automobile 
J-^-^llN J. UN U A „ Work Guaranteed 


Machinists and Engineers 

fCCMAM DDMC Automobile Repairing a Specialty 
IXCCINAIN Dl\ WO. J50 Golden Gale Avenue, bet. Hyde 

and Latkln Streets 
Phones: Franklin 6823. Home J 2012 


FREE FROM CARBON 
PANHARD L. H. * B. I. BILL 
^v T T 543 Golden Gate Ave. 
^"^ San Francisco. Cal. 


PEART & ELKINGTON 

VULCANIZING ph0De Market 6370 

42 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 


Call and Investigate 
N.C.LL I ~ r\.AL-<llN E chanslor & lyon motor 

SUPPLY CO. 

1 llvCo soi Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 


"THE STANDARD OF QUALITY" 

FISK. TIRES Made t0 fit aM st y le rims 

For Sale by all Dealers 


MILLER SERVICE Now facilitated by a new wholesale 
AND depot at 589-591 Mission St , S. F. 

Mil I PP TIPF^ W. D. NEWERF RUBBER CO. 
IVllLLClA 1 1IVDO Los Angeles San Francisco 


NO OTHER HIGH POWERED CAR APPROACHES 

THE .MARMXXN 

* Th« Eui*kst Riding C*r tn The 'World " 

53 6 FCONOMY Telephone 
Golden Gate Ave. ajV-WllUlUl Franklin 4142 


REMY REMY ELECTRIC CO. 

• , , ,-, \ir7-r/~v 17 ° Golden Gate Ave. 
JVIALjINeIU San Francisco, Cal. 


PAPIFIP The Largest Automobile Repair Shop 

AllTnu/IDIirj ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

AUTOMOBILE , r„M„r.*. 

« jo Golden Gate Avenue 

-. -^ ■ . - . ~ -, San Francisco, Cat. 

EXCHANGE correjacars 


1 1Kb VULCANIZING mctarnahan vulcanizing 
A\ir> inRRiMr & tire company 

nl'U JUDDlllU 630 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 


AMERICAN THERMOS BOTTLE 

THERMOS company 

Thermos Building. New York City 
BOTTLES, CARAFES and 

MOGENSON WELLS CO. 

And LUNCH KITS Phelan Bide.. San Francisco 


PENNSYLVANIA Pennsylvania 

VACUUM CUP RUBBER COMPANY 
TIRES 512-514 Mission Street 



rX'ol 




HAVE YOU SEEN IT? 

THE NEW 

MICHELIN QUICK-DETACHABLE-CLINCHER TIRE 

It's as good as the Michelin Red Inner Tube 
MICHELIN 



San Francisco 



TIRE COMPANY 

Los Angeles 




July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



35 



R. K. Roberts, manager of the Howard Automobile Com- 
pany, who, for the past three weeks has been in the East on 
business connected with the Buick and National automobile 
factories, has returned home, and is again found in charge of 
the multitudinous duties which would necessarily follow a con- 
cern the proportions of the Howard Automobile Company, with 
agents in every city and town of any importance, from the 
most southerly line of Southern California to the border line 
of British Columbia on the north. 

As some evidence of the growth of this wonderful business, 
it may be stated that upwards of two thousand automobiles 
were sold during the closing season, and the Howard Auto- 
mobile Company sold more machines than any other branch 
or agency in the United States bearing the Buick name, and it 
is fully anticipated that this number will be exceeded by at 
least twenty-five per cent during the coming season. 

In speaking of this wonderful business with the name of the 
Howard service, Manager Roberts said : "I can assure you that 
it was a real and gratifying pleasure, supporting the last state- 
ment, to hear the kindly expressions of big, broadminded, far- 
seeing men of affairs expressing their admiration for the able 
organization away out there on the Pacific Coast, leading the 
entire country on sales and the high standing which has been 
attained through that service." 

This shows that the fame of the concern has spread to the 
largest manufacturing cities of the United States, displaying 
that one strong fact that the clean, straightforward methods 
and policy of the Howard Company has become far reaching, 
and no longer confined to local conditions. 

Still more comprehensive details are planned for the future, 
augmenting the Howard service, and this will be continued to 
that perfection which renders to customer and the seller alike 
that confidence which a high standard of business policy al- 
ways breeds when faithfully performed. 

* * * 

Through the Standard Motor Car Company comes the report 
of a wonderful record of endurance and power made by Dr. 
Albert D. Bailey, the noted eye specialist of Boston, Mass., 
who has just completed a trip across both continents in a 40 
h. p. Stoddard-Dayton "Stratford." Just one year ago Dr. 
Bailey, accompanied by his wife and two daughters, shipped 
their car to Liverpool, touring from that city to London, visiting 
Chester, one of the most famous cities of the old world en route. 
Thence the party motored to Stratford-on-Avon, the home of 
Shakespeare, continuing on over the finest drive in England to 
Warwick Castle, the ruins of Kenilworth, Leamington and 
Dover, from whence the car was shipped across the Channel 
and driven to Paris. After a week's stay in the gay city, the 
car was driven to Switzerland, and two delightful weeks spent 
motoring over the ideal Swiss highways through the Alps. Of 
all roads on either side of the Atlantic the doctor says that none 
can compare with those in Switzerland. There one can climb 
to an altitude of eight thousand feet on highways surpassing 
our finest boulevards, and the ascent is over easy grades rang- 
ing from five to nine per cent. After leaving Switzerland the 
itinerary included stops in Germany, Belgium and Holland. 
Sailing from Hamburg, the tourists returned to New York City, 
arriving there May 2d. 

» » * 

On May 29th, Mr. E. E. Bloom sailed for Europe in the in- 
terests of the Haynes Automobile Company. The increased 
demand for the Haynes cars in foreign countries has grown to 
such important proportions that a separate export department 
was made necessary in order to give this branch of the busi- 
ness the careful and prompt attention it requires. Mr. Bloom 
has spent many years in the exporting business, and his famil- 
iarity with the numerous details connected therewith has been 
a great factor in the success of the Haynes Company abroad. 
But to the Haynes car itself must be given the credit of having 
made good in the hands of its foreign owners. 




A Show » .t.uhh-, norchrd treads 

B Show* iin.t.t . 

D Show* abnorbinK mr«i>» wh» 
pa Ming ovrr an obstruction 



MOTZ Cushion Tires 

For Pleasure Cars and Light Delivery Car* 

■ 
The Motz Tire and Rubber Co., Executive Office: Akron. Ohio 

BRANCHES: :<•:• Micbigafl *-»»< CM* l|PM l" i: Broadway, N«r*f fork N V 
Ufa R*i-c St.. Philadelphia: •%• Woodward Ave.. Detroit. Mick) 
4*« E. 15ih St., Kama* Cttv. Mo : »5i Euclid Ave.. Cleveland. 
Ohio Standard lire A Rubber Co.. IM-IM Portland St.. 
BoaftM MfM Pistributora lor the New England State*. 




s20GN&S± 



'Always Tbert" 

SPLITDORF SERVICE goes arm In arm with 
SPLITDORF IGNITION— and has been a continuous 
SPLITDORF POLICY for more than two decades. 
From the earliest days of coils and pluos and 
through every stage of Ignition service, SPLIT- 
DORF has been synonymous with SERVICE. 
If YOU DO NOT BENEFIT from this SERVICE, 
the fault is your own. Our experts are at your call 
— our branches, which are miniature factories In 
equioment, are scattered throughout the country 
and our Inflexible rule is— "SATISFY THE CUS- 
TOMER." 

Com,' to us with your Ignition troubles — we will 
gladly shoulder all responsibilities for changes and 
adjustments and guarantee the greatest satis- 
faction. 

Write for our "Racine Record" 

Splitdorf Electrical Company 

Pacific Coist Branch 

430-36 Van Ness \ve. San Francisco 



tUhUl 



THE CHAMPION WIND SHIELD 



IS GUARANTEED 




GIa»i Fronti For All Types of Automobiles 
HIGHEST QUALITY GREATEST STRENGTH 

Champion Wind Shield Mfg. Co. 



Eddy and La r kin Sta. 



San Franciico 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Call on us when you want photographs of any kind. 
We can and will please you. Our new studio, the 
largest west of New York, covers 9,000 square feet of 
floor space and is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. Tou are cordially Invited to call and 
we will be very glad to take you through the different 
departments, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging, 
Kodak, etc. Tou will be Interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO., 
Everything In Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phones— Franklin 1184. Home C 4084 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER. 



37-45 First Street, San Francisco. Phones: Sutter 2230; J 3221 

Private Exchange Connecting all Departments. 




GTlLVAND^ XJfflCB RESORT: 




x 



&®m 




Highland Springs 

RATES— Tents, $12 per week; cottage, $14 to $16: main hotel, $14, 
$16, $17.50. FARE— San Francisco to Highland Springs, train and 
stage, $S round trip; train and auto, $11 round trip. Special trans- 
portation rates to guests as follows: 1 week's stay at Highland 
Springs, San Francisco to Highland Springs and return by stage. 
$7; by auto. $9.50. 2 weeks' stay, San Francisco to Highland Springs 
and return, by stage, $6.50; by auto, $8.50. Those wishing these 
rates, inquire of Peck-Judah, 6S7 Market street, or address 



W. H. MARSHALL, Prop.. Highland Springs. 



HARBIN SPRINGS 

NEAREST LAKE COUNTY REPORT TO SAN FRANCISCO 
A delightful run over good roads through a beautiful country. 
Automobile supplies kept; facilities for ordinary repairs; wash rack. 
Hot and Cold Tub Baths, Showers, Natural Hot Mineral Water 
Plunge, Swimming Tank, Etc. 

EXCELLENT TABLE. 



Emerald Bay Camp 

Beautifully situated, moderately equipped tents and cottages; 
boating, fishing, bathing, tramping. New management. Nelson L. 
Salter, Prop. Lee S. Seward, Manager. Address Manager, Emer- 
ald Bay P. O.. Lake Tahoe, CaL, or Peck-Judah Co.. 687 Market St., 
San Francisco. 



HOWARD SPRINGS 

Lake County's Famous 42 Mineral Springs 

(Under new management) 

Lithia for kidneys; hot iron, bath, 1 1 > degrees, for rheum- 
a i - m. The waters of the Hot Magnesia Springs have a wonder- 
ful record in the cure of stomach trouble; SlV!toS18 Derweek. 

R. J. YATES, Prop.. Howard Springs. Lake County, Cal. 



MOUNTAIN HOME 

In the Santa Cruz Mountains. No better place In Central California 
for hunting, fishing or swimming. Table unsurpassed; delightful 
climate; stage at Morgan Hill Monday, Wednesday and Saturday. 
Excellent roads for automobiles. Train leaves San Francisco at 
7 a. m. Phone Farmers 61. Madrone. Send for souvenir of Mrs. 
V'lc. Poncelet. Llagas, Cal. 



CARRS 

NEW MONTE RIO HOTEL 

Nearest to Station and River 

N»w modern hotel, first class In every detail and equipped with every modern 
convenience Swimming, boating, canoeing, fishing, launching, horseback 

rilineand driving. Address C. F. CARR, Monte Rio, Sonoma Co.. Cal. 



CASA DEL REY 



SANTA CRUZ 



CAL. 



New 30^-room, fireproof hotel 
located near the beach and the 
Casino, open all the year round 

AMERICAN PLAN 

Tennis Courts, Good boating, 
bathing and fishing; numerous 
drives along the Coast and 
through the mountains. 

SUPERIOR GOLFING 

SANTA CRUZ BEACH HOTEL COMPANY 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Now Open 

Hot Steam Baths Cold Sulphur and Sour Springs 

Address — 

MISS ROSE ANDERSON 

Anderson Springs, Middletown Lake County, Cal. 



FETTERS HOT SPRINGS 

Modern, Convenient, Comfortable. Open all Year 'Round. 
Natural hot mineral springs, bath-house 50 feet from hotel and 
cottages; electric lights, new garage; hot and cold mineral water in 
every room; hunting, fishing, swimming, orchard, vineyard and 
dairy; two blocks from station; auto and 'bus meet all trains. Buy 
ticket to Agua Caliente, via N. "W. P. or S. P. Address GEO. FET- 
TERS. Fetters Hot Springs. Sonoma County. Cal. 



Brookdale Hotel 

In the heart of the Santa Cruz Mountains, only 2l£ hours from 
S. F. White sulphur water springs on hotel grounds. No wind; 
no Tog. Climate ideal. TROUT FISHING, the best In 10 years. For 
Information and booklet, write MRS. M. FAIRLEE, Prop., Brook- 
dale, or Peck-Judah's. 



C. J. Boehm, Proprietor. Ben Lomond. Santa Cruz County, Cal. 
18 Trains Dally. 

HOTEL BEN LOMOND 

AND COTTAGES 
C. J. BOEHM, Proprietor 

Rates $2.50 per day. Most beautiful home in the Santa Cruz 
Mountains. Private baths. All modern conveniences. First-class 
tennis and croquet courts. Billiards, Bowling Alley, Boating, Bath- 
ing and Fishing. 



Campers to Yosemite Valley 

Can be supplied with tents, complete camping outfits and all kinds 
of provisions at the Yosemite Valley store. Parties outfitted for 
High Sierra trips and flshinf, excursions. Rates reasonable. NEL- 
SON L. SALTER. Proprietor. 



GILROY HOT SPRINGS 

Santa Clara County. 

Only four hours from San Francisco. Round trip rate, including 
stage, $5.70. Fine road for automobiles. Full Information and 
folders at Peck-Judah Co., 687 Market St., S. F., or 

W. J. McDONALD, Prop. 



BEAUTIFUL 



Paraiso Hot Springs 



Now's the Time to Visit California's Real Paradise 

Weather and roads are unsurpassed. Wonderful natural hot soda 
and sulphur; guaranteed for rheumatism, liver, kidney and all 
stomach troubles. Expert masseurs. Rates $12 to $16, including 
baths. Round trip $6.35, including auto. Mecca for north and 
south bound autos. Logical one-day run. Free workshop and gar- 
age; accessories. Leave Third and Townsend, 9:00 a. m. First and 
Broadway, Oakland 8:00 a. m. Or will meet 4 p. m. train if notified. 
Booklets Peck-Judah or Bryans'. 

H. H. McGOWAN, Prop, and Mgr. 

Paraiso Springs Monterey County 



YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK 

The Oiiiing-Phice of California 

SNOW-CAPPED MOUNTAINS MIRROR LAKES AND HAPPY ISLES 

THUNDERING WATIRI-ALLS MASSIVE WAILS AND DOMES 

A Galaxy Unsurpassed 

A Smooth, Dustless, Well Sprinkled Road Into the Valley 

A Special Feature of This Season's Trip 

The waterfalls are booming full. Condi- 
tions in the Valley were never better than 
this season. Surrounding mountain peaks and 
watersheds are covered with late snows, 
which insures a lasting flow of water. 

Why visit the commonplace resorts, when 
the sublime and the beautiful beckon you. 
Cost of this trip is now reduced to popular 
prices. Four excellent camps offer the visitor 
the most pleasing entertainment: 
CAMP CURRY, CAMP AHWAHNEE, CAMP 
LOST ARROW, SENTINEL HOTEL. 
j^ach Is charmingly and picturesquely situ- 
ated on the floor of the Valley, surrounded 
by the masterpieces of Nature. 

Tt is now a quick, comfortable trip into the 
Valley. For full information or descriptive 
folder, address your camp or hotel in Yosem- 
ite. any ticket office or Information bureau In 
California, or 

YOSEMITE VALLEY RAILROAD COMPANY, Merced, Cal. 




Hotel Westminster 

LOS ANGELES. CAL Fourth and Main Sta. 

American Plan Reopened. 

Rates per day, $2.50, rooms without bath 
Rooms with bath, $3, $3.50 and $4. 

European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up. 
With bath $1.50 and up. 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



White Diamond Water Co. 



locorporated 



rwiWitrrl.rOl.lJld 

Alssie* 
Berk«te? 



An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 
treated, but bacterlologlcally purified by electrical process. 6 gallons 
DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. $1.50 per month. Single 6 gallon 
bottle. 40 cents 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 86792, 
S736 T«(egraph Ave-, opposite Idora Park. Oakland, Cal- 



SULTAN TURKISH BATHS 

624 POST STREET. 

Special Department for Ladles. 

Open Day and Night for Ladles and Gentlemen. 

Al. Johnson, formerly of Sutter Street Hammam, has leased ths 

Sultan Turkish Baths, where he will be glad to see his old and new 

customer*. 



She — Didn't you say you'd go through fire and water for 

me? He — Yes, but I'm blowed if I'm going through bank- 
ruptcy for you! — Yonkers Statesman. 



Tallac and Brockway 

LAKE TAHOE 

The scenic resorts that have made Lake Tahoe 
famous. Open June 1st, under same management as in 
past years. Fishing season opens June 1st. 

Autos From Placerville Daily 

The Automobile Trip over the Placerville State Road 
is the most picturesque in America. Two 7-passenger 
Pierce-Arrow automobiles run daily, one leaving Placer- 
ville at 7 a. m. daily; one leaving Tallac at 7 a. m. daily; 
arriving at destinations at noon. 

LAWRENCE & COMSTOCK 



Tallac. Cal. 



Brockway, Cal. 




Open all the year. New 
ownership. New man- 
agement. New features. 
Forty rooms with private 
baths. 

Golf Tennis Bowling Fishing 

Boating Swimming Club House 

Free Garage 

Everything Possible for Your Comfort and Pleasure 
Rates $17.50 to $25.00 per week, $3.00 to $4.00 per day 

Booklets and other particulars at PECK-JUDAH CO., or write 

J. M. SHOULTS BEN LOMOND. CAL. 



Lake County 
Automobile Transportation Co. 

■ tigers carried by automobile and stages from Fieta to High- 
land springs, I-.akepnrt, Kelseyville and Upper Lake Fine moun- 
ovei i his line. I Special all-rail and auto round -trip 
tickets, San Francisco to Bartlett Springs and return, only $18. In- 
cluding trip across beautiful Clear Lake.) Also Soda Bay and re- 
turn for ?13.r.<>, Including boat nn lake. Extra auto charge in addi- 
i in Highland Springs, $1.60; to Lakeport 
-l 50. Tickets nn sale at Northwest Railroad Company, 

i :i_ , in. I s7 1 Market street. San Francisco. 



RIONIDO HOTEL 

AND TENTS 
The ideal resort of the Russian river. Now open. 
Make your reservations now. Rates $12 per week. 
Address Rionido Co., Rionido, Cal. 



MARK WEST SPRINGS 

Trains leave S. F. twice daily to Fulton, where stages connect. 
Round trip $3. 75, Including stage. Excellent table; hot mineral baths. 
All kinds of sports. Address MRS. A\. MULGREW, Fulton, Cal. 
Particulars, Peck-Judah, (-87 Market St. 



HAMMOCKS 

We have an overstock and will sacrifice these Hammocks at 
a very low price. We are making a specialty of Blue and White 
Canvas Striped Hammocks at $1.25 each. 

WEEKS-HOWE EMERSON COMPANY 



51 Market Street 



Francii 



THE GABLES 

The hotel that is different Every thing new . Nearest hot mineral 
springs to City. Paying guests received. Address 

H. P. MATHHWSON, Sonoma, Cal. 

Buy tickets to Verano. N. W. P. Railway 



38 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 





THE AMERICAN GENTLEMAN EXCELS 
IN THE HOSPITALITY OF HIS HOME 

HUNTER 
WHISKEY 



EXCELS IN ITS PURITY. FLAVOR 
AND GENERAL EXCELLENCE 



Sold at all flrat-class cafes and by jobbers. 
WM. LANAHAN & SON. Baltimore. Md. 




y*?\ Toyo Kisen 
r* Kaisha 

(ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO.) 

S. S. Shinyo Maru (New) Saturday, August 3, 1912 

S. S. Chiyo Maru Saturday, August 31, 1912 

S. S. Nippon Maru Saturday, September 21. 1912 

(Intermediate Service Saloon accommodations at reduced rates.) 
S. S. Tenyo Maru (via Manila direct) ...Friday. September 27, 1912 

Steamers sail from company's pier. No. 34. near foot of Brannan 
street 1 p. m. for Yokohama and Hongkong, calling at Honolulu, 
Kobe (Hlogo). Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hong- 
kong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

No cargo received on biard on day of sailing. 

Round trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For freight and passage apply at office, 4th floor. Western Metrop- 
olis National Bank Building. 625 Market street. 

W. H. AVERY. Assistant General Manager. 



Murphy Grant & Company 

■Wholesale Dry Goods Furnishing Goods 

Notions 'White Goods Laces 

N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 



I "uBBER STam£ u . 

Stencils,Seals.Signss_Etc. 




JWSVKAral 




f'JUi 



560 MARKET ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



The sick-insurar.ee law of Norway, which was effective July 
1, 1911, embraces all wage earners and public servants over fif- 
teen years of age whose yearly earnings do not exceed $322 if 
in the rural districts, or $375 in the cities. The law also pro- 
vides that the employer shall pay a certain percentage (one- 
sixth) of the premium, while he is held responsible for the 
whole, but may deduct from the wages of the insured, at the end 
of the term for which the premium is paid the amount thus ad- 
vanced. Theoretically, it is self-insurance on the contributive 
plan, while actually it amounts to an extra tax upon the em- 
ployer, as most employees stipulate when engaging their ser- 
vices that the insurance premium shall be paid in addition to 
the wages. The first report just made from one of the cities in- 
dicates that the law is not working satisfactorily, as there was 
a shortage due to the immense number of applications for sick 
benefits. 

* * * 

City Auditor Anderson of Los Angeles has proposed to the 
Public Service Commission the organization of a bonding asso- 
ciation among the employees of the Los Angeles water depart- 
ment. There are about forty employees of the department who 
are required to give bonds ranging from $1,000 to $25,000 
when engaged in special work for a limited period. It is pro- 
posed to organize a mutual bonding association in the depart- 
ment to save the employees the payment of premiums. The 
plan is said to have been favorably received and special counsel 
assigned to define a definite plan of procedure. As there is no 
provision in the California insurance laws for mutual bonding 
or surety concerns, it is doubtful whether the project will ever 

be placed in operation. 

* * * 

E. D. Crane, lax collector for Riverside County, Cal., was ar- 
rested during the past week, charged with a shortage of ap- 
proximately $11,000 in Ihe accounts of his office. Crane sub- 
sequently made good the amount missing, but not until after 
twenty-eight of his fellow citizens at Riverside had endured 
considerable mental anguish. The tortured twenty-eight had 
loaned themselves as personal surety for Crane for amounts 
ranging from $1,000 to $5,000, twenty being bound for $2,000 
each. The National Surety was formerly bondsman for Crane, 
but secured its release several months ago, following a report 
by the Grand Jury criticising the conduct of Crane's office. 

* * * 

A unique claim for compensation has been filed with the 
Washington Industrial Insurance Commission. Joseph W. 
Brown, who was employed on State road work, asks indemnity 
from the State insurance fund for injuries received in a saloon 
fight at Newport, Wash., last May. Brown claims he was sent 
into Newport to secure men to work on the roads, and visiting 
a saloon for that purpose, was severely beaten and suffered a 
broken leg while trying to enlist workers. He claims that these 
injuries were received in the proper discharge of his duties. 

* * * 

A jury at Minneapolis has returned a verdict against the 
Travelers, holding death by ptomaine poisoning to be an acci- 
dent within the meaning of an accident policy. Adele W. 
Durant was awarded a judgment of $6432.90. Her husband 
had taken out a policy just before starting on a trip June 29, 
1910. While awav, he was poisoned by food, and died soon 
after returning. The full amount of the policy was awarded 

Mrs. Durant. 

* * * 

The National Association of Life Underwriters is expected 
to have the greatest convention in its history at Memphis next 
October. A list of eminent speakers and a splendid entertain- 
ment have been arranged. 

* * * 

Georgia has passed a bill requiring life insurance companies 
to invest 75 per cent of their Georgia policies in Georgia se- 
curities. The same action was attempted in Texas, and all the 
large outside companies withdrew from the State. 



July 27, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



39 



The Denver & R ; o Grande has started an accident prevention 
campaign among its employees. It proposes to organize safety 
committees from employees at the various division points and 
other towns along the road, which shall co-operate with a head 
committee of company officials in detecting and remedying 
causes which contribute to railroad accidents. 

* * * 

The executive committee of the Washington State Associa- 
tion of Local Fire Insurance Agents, met in Seattle July 19th, 
to consider the conditions of insurance business in the various 
sections of the State. The different parts of the insurance code 
were also discussed. 

The brokerage firm of Kahn & Feder has been given a con- 
tract to write local business for a syndicate of guaranteed un- 
derwriters at Lloyd's. Risks will be written in the field west 
of Chicago. 

* * * 

The largest fire of the week was in the business section of 
Vancouver, resulting in the destruction of a big hotel and sev- 
eral other big buildings, with damages estimated at nearly 
$2,000,000. 




Pacific Mutual Life 
Ins. Co. of California 

Insure Against 
LOSS OF INCOME 

EARNING POWER 




or SALARY 



*A^&*^**^ 



SHREVE BUILDING 



Manager Accident Department 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



British fire companies report that the profits will be scant 
from their operations in the United States this year. Fire 

losses and rate reductions are attributed as the cause. 

* * * 

Assessment life insurance companies are on the decline. 
Their failure is attributed to attempts to furnish insurance for 
less than mortality requires. 

:;: ft :J: 

L. A. Blackman was re-elected president of the California 
National Life Insurance Company at San Diego last week. The 

company reports $2,000,000 paid insurance on its books. 

* * * 

Arthur M. Brown, of Edward Brown & Sons' general agency, 

is on his way home after an extended tour of Europe. 

* * * 

Charles W. Smith, a well known insurance man, was arrested 
this week on the charge of procuring insurance in two com- 
panies unauthorized to operate in California. 

* * * 

George H. Strat f on has been appointed State agent for the 
Germania Fire, with headquarters in this city. Of late years 

Mr. Stratton ha? made his home in New York. 

* * * 

The Century Insurance Company, Ltd., of Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, and the New Hampshire Fire, have applied for licenses 

to enter California. 

* * * 

F. H. Rhoads, who became manager of the Metropolitan dis- 
trict for the National Union Fire some four months ago, has 
resigned. No announcement has been made of his successor. 

* * * 

Rolla V. Watt, manager of the Royal & Queen, is on a busi- 
ness trip in the Northwest territory. 



Capital $1,500,000 



Assets $8,650,000 



A commercial traveler at a railway station in one of our 

Southern towns included in his order for breakfast two boiled 
eggs. The old darkey who served him brought him three. "Un- 
cle," said the traveling man, "why in the world did you bring 
me three boiled eggs? I only ordered two." "Yes, sir," said 
the old darkey, bowing and smiling. "I know you did order two. 
sir, but I brought three, because I just naturally felt dat one of 
dem might fail you, sir."— Harpers Weekly. 



Wedding Presents.— The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Dr. Agnew. racial ilieatai exclusively. 424 Pacific Bulldlnc, San 

Francisco. 



The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organised 1S6S Caeh Capital. M.000.000 

Insurance on personal eftecta of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere In United States. Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss 
by Ore Automobile Insurance. Indemnity tor loss of rental Income by 
Ore. 

H. U ROFF. General Agent. J. J. 8HBAHAN. Assrt, general Agent 

124 fansome Street, Ian Francleco, Cel. 



California and Sansome Streets, 
San Francisco, California. 



Capital, 1400.000 



Assets, Over a Million 



Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 
(Best In the West.) 

Employers' Liability. General Liability. Teams. Elevator. Workmen's 
Collective. Vessels. Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass Accident and Health 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; Marshal A. Frank, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Joy Llchtensteln. Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co.. Treasurer; F. P. 
Deerlng, Counsel. L. B. Hoge, General Manager Accident and Health De- 
partment. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 416 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Weft Coaft Life Insurance Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are r-lear and explicit and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

Geo. E. Billings Roy C. Wird James K. Polk J. C. Meussdorf.tr James W. Dees 



GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED 



S12 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Douglas 22SI 
Home Phone C lilt 



The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1!50. 

Sixty-Second Annual Statement. 

Capital 11,000,000 

Surplus to Policyholders 3,117.284 

Total Assets 7,617,091 

Pacific Department: 

Alaska Commercial Building ..... g an Francisco 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 





REMEMBER!!! 




We write 




Liability Insurance, in all its branches, Automobile 


Plate Glass, 


Burglary 


, Elevator, and Health and Accident Insurance. 
PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY 




Sen 


Francisco. Csl. C. H. CRAWFORD. 


President 



40 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 27, 1912. 



BANKING 



•J A section of the SAFE 
DEPOSIT VAULTS of the 

Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank of San 
Francisco, California. 

<| Here will be found fifteen 
automatic and anti-burglar cou- 
pon rooms arranged with every 
convenience, for the exclusive 
use of the patrons of the 
Vault Depart nent. 

BOXES $4 PER YEAR AND UPWARD. PACKAGES TAKEN FOR STORAGE 




/ 




ANGLO & LONDON 

PARIS NATIONAL 

BANK 

SAN FRANCISCO 
FKld-Up Capital H, 000,000 



Surplus oDd Undtridad 


ProflU $1,000,000 


Total Resource* 


$40,000,000 


OFFICERS; 


HERBERT FLEIS WHACKER Praaidcnl 


510, QREENEB1CM Che 


irmaoof the Board 


JOS. FRIEDUKDKR 


Vica-Pra»idcnt 


C. F HUST 


Vice-Preiidrnt 


R. ALTSCHTJL 


Caihior 


0. R. PARKER 


AniBlaDt t'aitiier 


WH. H. HIOB 


AasUtai.t OuUer 


H. CliOVNSKl 


AsaistADt Caihkr 


Q. R. BURDICK 


AiiUUdI Caahler 


A L. LANOERHAN 


SecreUrj 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO 

SIR EDMUND WALKER C. V. O.. LL. D.. D. C. L. 

President 

ALEXANDER LAIRD General Minuter 



ESTABLISHED 1867 

Paid-up Capital, $15,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 12,500,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers* Cheques recently Issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way In which to carry money when traveling. They are Is- 
sued In denominations of 

$10, $20, $50, $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable In Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland Is stated on the face of each cheque, while In other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all Information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

460 California Street, corner Leldesdorff. 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

(The German Bank) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The following Branches for Receipt and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission St., Between 21st and 22nd 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 Clement St., cor. 7th Ave. 

H VIGHT STREET BRANCH, 14S6 Haight St., Near Masonic Ave. 

June 29th, 1912 
Assets ------ 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 
Reserve and Contingent Funds 
Employees' Pension Fund 
Number of Depositors - 



$51,140,101.75 

1,000,000.00 

1,656,403.80 

140,109.60 

56,609 



Office Hours : 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays 
to 12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 
o'clock p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 




HISTORY. 

"Past is the past." But no, it is not past; 

In us, in us, it quickens, wants, aspires; 
And on our hearts the unknown Dead have cast 

The hungers and the thirst of their desires. 

Unknown the pangs, the peace we too prepare! 

What shakes this bosom shall reverberate 
Through ages unconceived; but in dark lair 

The unguessed, unhoped, undreaded issues wait. 

Our pregnant acts are all unprophesied. 

We dream sublime conclusions; destine, plan, 
Build and unbuild; yet turn no jot aside 

The something infinite that moves in man. 

We write The End where fate has scarce begun; 
And no man knows the thing that he has done. 

-Laurence Binyon in The Oxford and Cambridge Review. 



THE GREAT SOUL. 



Simply he fared along the ways of men, 
Nor looked he other to the stranger's eye 
Than those, his brother souls, who walked near by, 

Companions in life's endless caravan; 

And if he caught some far-off answer when 

Their grieving souls would vainly question why. 
He gave no sign, nor if above the sky 

Some vision lured, that lay beyond their ken. 

But sometimes, when the road was hard and long, 
And weary feet would falter near his own, 

His voice would lift itself in some clear song, 
So full of hope that all who were in pain 
Or doubt, would listen, then to him unknown, 

Take heart, and start upon their way again. 

— Mary Page Greenleaf in Sunset. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 

Railway construction in India is booming under the in- 
spiration of British money and engineers. 



ARMOR PLATE SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of Union Safe Deposit Company in Building of 

UNION TRUST COMPANY 

of San Francisco 

Junction of Market and O'Farrell Streets and Grant Avenue 




Largest, Strongest and Most Conveniently Arranged 
Safe Deposit West of New York 



Boxes $4.00 Per Annum and Upwards 



Telephone Kearny 1 1 




QattflrwhMi jmr *k **»> 



Vol. lxxxiv 



FRANCl&j 

)TER 

Dtvoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 





San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, August 3, 1912 



No. 5 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published everv Saturday by the Proprietor. Fred- 
erick Marriott. 21 Sutter street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco. Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office— (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, and 156 Fifth 
avenue, S. L. Carman, representatives. 

Chicago Office — H. L. Selden, 122 South Michigan Boulevard. 

Boston Office — Charles S. Parr, 525 Tremont Temple. 

London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements, or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 
CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, should be sent to the office not later than 
5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (including postage)— 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, $2.26. 
Foreign — 1 year, $6.00; 6 months, $3.26. 



And now there's a law against free lunch in Los Angeles. 

Take a bite or two of that matchless climate with your ap- 
petizer. 

"There is nothing to it," say the bull moosers, "but 

Roosevelt." Indeed, the country at large had begun to suspect 
as much. 

The reported effect of the hula-hula trust in Hawaii is 

to make every "little movement" mean a little less and cost a 
little more. 

Mrs. Gertrude Franklin Atherton rises to remark that 

San Francisco women "live like a lot of oysters." Don't get 
rude, Gertrude. 

President Taft's kindly words to and for old maids will 

not lose him anything in those six States where the ballot 
knows no sex. 

The open season for bull moose will begin early next 

November. There will be no restrictions against soft-nose or 
dum-dum ballots. 

New Jersey boasts a book agent one hundred years old, 

and still working at it. There's a man who ought to have some 
kind of a pension. 

A grim, rectangular shadow with a noose dangling from 

its cross-beam is cast athwart the entrance to police headquar- 
ters in New York City. 

Los Angeles has a woman beggar with a tidy little for- 
tune of about $300,000. It must be terrible to be really poor in 
a community like that. 

A Minnesota Congressman is out to abolish the United 

States Senate. Where, then, shall the millionaires spend the 
afternoons of their lives? 

"Congress," says a press despatch, "may be in continu- 
ous session for a year." Oh, Lord! What has this poor coun- 
try done to deserve such treatment ? 

It has been discovered by a French physician that stage 

fright can be cured by treating the nose with a red-hot needle. 
We shall prefer to go on being scared whenever it is our turn 
to get up on our hind legs and talk to our fellow citizens. 



A few arc lights along the Park drives might help some 

to cut down the early morning record of motor mishaps. 

Scientists have uncovered in Wyoming the remains of a 

dinosaur which, in life, was sixty-five feet long— big enough 
to bolt a bull moose in one big bite. 

Here we are talking about game protection, and a lusty 

buck nearly frazzles the daylights out of a Marin County dep- 
uty sheriff. Why not man protection? 

— — The Colonel, according to a Rhode Island clergyman, is 
more like Jesus Christ than any man in public life. Well, how 
about Heney, and Rowell, and Lissner? 

Chicago folks have subscribed $5,000 a year to publish 

a magazine of verse — and we were just beginning to think that 
the Lake village had got over most of its troubles! 

At 83 a San Francisco business man applies for a license 

to wed a lady something less than half his years. The attention 
of Dr. Osier is respectfully invited to this instance. 

Miss Jane Addams is a bold woman. She is starting out 

to make the Colonel say what he means about woman suffrage. 
The trouble is that she can't get him to mean what he says. 

Maybe sister Oakland wishes now that she had dealt 

with the I. W. W. on the San Diego plan instead of letting them 
try to put over a recall proposition for the establishment of 
anarchy. 

You can plainly see how worried the trusts are, and how 

unsettled the confidence of investors in industrials is when 
you note that Standard Oil this week touched the record figure 
of $1,000 a share. 

If the Board of Control is not permitted to edit the State 

Blue Book, then there won't be any Blue Book. Otherwise it 
might contain some hint at the truth about Hiram and his asso- 
ciate Holy Rollers. 

A Pennsylvania man eats five quarts of peanuts and 

drinks 30 glasses of beer in an hour, and still lives to be ex- 
hibited at any county fair that is shy of prize-winning material 
in the pork department. 

If it be true, as the Postmaster General reports, that mail 

swindlers took $120,000,000 off the American public in the last 
fiscal year, then surely the sucker birth-rate has increased from 
the old figure of "one a minute." 

One municipal experiment Mayor Rolph is bound to re- 
gret is his invitation to all the city's "kickers" to meet him per- 
sonally every Monday evening. They'll come and they'll kick, 
and then they'll go and they'll kick. 

Secretary McVeagh proposes a five-story deep subter- 
ranean storehouse in New York, where Uncle Sam shall lay 
two billion dollars worth of gold bars. Practical burglars will 
now turn their attention to underground methods. 




E/DITORIAlv COMMENT 




The army board of engineers inves- 
Mayor Rolph Tracing tigating the San Francisco water 
The Water Job. question is in the city, but at the 

hour of this writing the inquiry still 
waits. It has been waiting for more than a year — waiting on 
City and County Attorney Long and the city's engineering de- 
partment. The latest recorded move of Mr. Long was a request 
this week for another appropriation to enable him to present 
the city's case to the army engineers. There is already a 
numerous family of these requests, some big, some little. Each 
one of them, one might say, is accompanied by a request for 
more time. "More time and more money" — that is the char- 
acteristic plea of the City and County Attorney whenever the 
water question comes up, whenever the army board courteously 
indicates its readiness to proceed. 

A good many years and a good many hundreds of thousands 
of dollars have been spent in the preliminaries of the Hetch- 
Hetchy project. It will depend upon the recommendation of 
the army board whether we are to have any Hetch-Hetchy 
rights at all, and yet for more than twelve months the city has 
been asking delay after delay in the hearing that must precede 
any recommendation. It has long been apparent that San 
Francisco's case was weak and needed time for bolstering — 
either that or the City and County Attorney and the City En- 
gineer have been and are acting in bad faith. 

Now at the last possible moment — for it is inconceivable that 
the government experts will delay much longer — comes Expert 
Freeman with his $50,000 "report," which upsets and makes 
absurd all the work done by Long, Manson, et al., up to this 
time, and asks for very much more than the department at 
Washington has ever contemplated giving us. 

The army engineers have been all over the ground for them- 
selves. They know, or should know, what sources aside from 
the Hetch-Hetchy are available for San Francisco. In addition 
to that it will be not merely competent for them to examine 
into the feasibility of our Hetch-Hetchy project, physically and 
financially, but it will be their duty to do so. What will they 
say to Mr. Freeman's proposition of seventy miles of tunnel, 
and most of it through hard rock, whereby he would have 
Hetch-Hetchy water delivered here by gravity? 

The army engineers must know something about the cost of 
hard rock tunnels. Undoubtedly they are familiar with the 
figures of the world's greatest bores; they know, surely, that it 
cost $60,000,000 to drive nine miles of the St. Gothard tunnel 
through material no harder than that which would be en- 
countered for more than half of the proposed Freeman tunnel. 
It is a matter of fact that fully forty miles of the Freeman tun- 
nel would pass through quartz, porphyrite and granite. It would 
be the world's greatest undertaking in tunnel building. Twenty 
years and $200,000,000 would be reasonable estimates of its 
cost in time and money. 

And what will the army engineers say of Freeman's high- 
priced report? What will they think of a city that has kept 
them waiting for more than a year, and has spent great sums 
preparing a case whose most important element controverts all 
the other elements, and is yet a sad and sorry joke of a docu- 
ment? We shall probably have reason for shame when the 
report of the army board is made public. The blame can be 
laid in all fairness upon Mr. Long, upon Marsden Manson, and 
upon the many other little men who have cut a pitiful figure 
when they got up alongside this big problem. 

The News Letter trusts that Mayor Rolph will carry out his 



announced intention of "sitting in" personally on the water 
case. He ought to know about these things at first hand; he 
should inform himself directly how the city's interests have 
been handled in the past — should be able to fix the responsibil- 
ity for the muddle and tangle in which the municipality now 
finds itself. There is no more important problem before him 
than this matter of water. He can best serve the people who 
elected him and rely upon him by taking vigorous hold of this 
affair and setting it straight. 

The greatest volume of water at the lowest cost should be the 
one consideration. The Mayor should visit all available sources 
— including Hetch-Hetchy — before further action on the recom- 
mendation 1 ; of Manson, Long, et al. 

The time is NOW! 



Lighting of the 
Main Park Drives 



3BT 

Better lights on the ocean beach 
highway and any lights at all along 
the roads of Golden Gate Park will 
serve materially to reduce the tale 
of motoring and driving accidents. The News Letter is grati- 
fied to note that the matter is occupying some part of the atten- 
tion of the automobile dealers, and will be pleased to help 
them bring about some needed improvements in this regard. 

A number of years ago there was considerable agitation look- 
ing to the lighting of the main Park drives to the beach. Finally 
poles were erected — you can see them any day as you pass 
that way — wires were strung and arc lights shone and sputtered 
all the way from the panhandle to the beach. That was long 
ago — before the age of gasoline. Before the automobile came 
in the lights went out. Probably it was a matter of cost; the 
city could not afford to illuminate its great pleasure ground. 
Now the Park is the darkest spot on the peninsula. 

And the lightless Park is not much worse off than most of the 
roads outside the limits of inhabited streets. We have not 
very many good roads, and, bad or good, none of them is suffi- 
ciently lighted. We might make a beginning of a better order 
of things with the Park and the ocean boulevard system. It 
happens that we have a progressive and active Board of Park 
Commissioners, composed chiefly of men who truly care for 
the Park, and are on the commission for that reason. The 
News Letter believes that if the needs of the situation with re- 
spect to lights were properly presented to the Board, and if 
the automobile organizations were to display a desire to co- 
operate, the Park could soon be made a place fit for after-dark 
use. Suppose we try it. 

Electric current can be had now at a much lower rate than 
in the old times when the Park was lighted for a little while. 
It is possible that the old poles could be utilized. They are 
still standing, and the cost of lamps and wiring would not 
be great. 

The headlights of motor cars are all that makes it possible 
to run an automobile through the Park these nights. There 
ought to be lights all along the way, with special warning lights 
to indicate turns and curves and danger points. On foggy 
nights the best driver and the most cautious is often compelled 
to take chances that are far too narrow for comfortable travel. 

And this is not merely an automobile matter: it concerns 
anybody who would like to visit the city's great and beautiful 
garden after nightfall — the pedestrian, the driver of any sort 
of vehicle. It is absurd that we have no good roads outside 
the Park and the ocean boulevards; it is worse than absurd 
that the good roads we have are not adequately lighted. 



August 3, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



Has Abe Ruef 
"Got the Goods" 
On Fremont Older? 



Between the lines of every suspi- 
ciously perfervid appeal for the; par- 
don of Abe Ruef that is publi 
in the San Francisco Bulletin, a row 
of pertinent question marks stands 
out in bold relief. What is Fremont Older's real reason for 
wishing to free his pal Ruef? Every one who knows the real 
character of Fremont Older, the managing editor of the Bulle- 
tin, knows that he has about as much real sympathy for his 
fellow men as a cuttle-fish. True it is that he permits the pub- 
lication of ostensibly radical articles which are cunningly cal- 
culated to appeal to the passions and prejudices of the mob. 
Older has found that a certain proportion of the tincture of 
maudlin sentimentality improves the circulation of his sheet. 
The boosting of pseudo-progressives in the columns of the Bul- 
letin creates the impression among uninformed people, who do 
not know how this yellow journal really does business, that its 
editor is really a sincere reformer. 

The same people who enthuse over the beginning of a series 
of "crusade articles" in the Bulletin seldom follow these effu- 
sions to their logical conclusions. For example, the Bulletin 
launches forth with fulsome invectives and muckraking men- 
dacity to "right some grievous wrong." For a couple of days 
its over-worked and half-starved staff pour broadsides of 
Billingsgate into the people who happen to have the honor of 
being on the "bad books" of the Bulletin. Then comes a sud- 
den cessation of its fusillade. The bullets from the Bulletin 
no longer find their billet. A General commands "Cease Fir- 
ing!" The matter is dropped, and "all's well." 

"The noble cause of reform" certainly must pay, if it is true 
that the business department values the services of Older at 
$13,000 per annum. No one in all San Francisco was such an 
extremist as Older during the so-called "graft prosecution." 

"An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth" was the humane 
policy Older advocated, as long as he found his program con- 
ducive to the profits of his paper. No medieval invention of in- 
genious torture would have been too cruel or unusual to apply 
to Abe Ruef, if Older could have had his way a couple of years 
ago. 

And now what a mysterious change of heart has come over 
Older. Mysterious, but not inexplicable. After Ruef got into 
San Quentin and came in intimate contact with professional 
jail-birds, he learned many things about many people. Every 
one connected with the Bulletin was at first nonplussed to know 
why the managing editor suddenly "got religion" from Ruef. 
It was most illuminating to behold the magic effect that a form 
of wireless messages emanating from San Quentin had upon the 
hitherto bomb-proof proprietor and editor of the Bulletin. From 
the moment that Ruef took a certain tack. Older experienced a 
wonderful change of heart. Now his columns are at the dis- 
posal of his erstwhile enemy, whom he permits to pay old 
scores against the men who rebuilt San Francisco, and whom 
he endeavored to hold up when he had the political power to do 
so. And so, day by day, those who read the Bulletin re-read 
the "sob stuff" that Older is putting forth to save his new-found 
pal from the "pen." As invisible ink may blaze forth in its 
real colors, so does the truth about the strange case of Ruef and 
Older become more obvious as the desperate editor of the Bul- 
letin resorts to the reckless printing of this transparent rot. And 
as the reading public ponders over this two-faced print, a know- 
ing smile spreads over the countenances of those who have 
good reason for believing that Ruef's sudden conversion and 
conquest of his old-time enemy was founded on facts. Go to it, 
Abe! Don't keep anything back! Tell us what you know be- 
fore the Bulletin's $13,000 editor takes his long-contemplated 
trip to Europe. 



A Seven Day 
Market for Fish. 



Are your butcher bills too high and 
the quality of your butcher's meat 
too low? Does the increased cost 
of living bear down on you as it 
does on nearly every civilized human being? 

Well, you — at least you who live anywhere close to the 
Pacific Ocean in these latitudes — have an easy and effective 
remedy ready to help you cure the trouble with the butcher 
bill, an agency to assist in putting the cost of living back 
where it belongs. 

The answer? Eat fish. Eat fish seven days a week instead 
of once a week, if at all. 

There is nothing better for your body and brain than the sea 
food to be had in such variety, so fresh and so appetizing in 
this market. Sure enough, fish is not now as cheap as it ought 
to be — as it will be whenever a considerable number of people 
hereabouts make a seven day or even a six day market for 
the product of net and hook. And still, at present prices, food 
unit for food unit, fish is a great deal cheaper than meat of any 
sort. Not only is it cheaper, but it is a wholesome variant, an 
article of diet that those concerned in the public health would 
be glad to see more freely used. 

There is not, and there never will be, any scarcity of fish in 
these waters. The present fishing fleets plying out of this har- 
bor to the nearby grounds must exercise the greatest caution 
lest they glut the market that calls for considerable quantities of 
fish only one day in the week. When the boats come in over- 
loaded, it simply means that the surplus must be sent to the 
fertilizer. Even if the surplus were to be offered gratis, there 
would be no response worth mentioning. The market will take 
just about so much and no more. 

The boats and the men now fishing out of San Francisco could 
readily supply six or seven times the amount now caught and 
consumed. If there were a seven or a six day market they could 
and would be profitably employed all the week, and they could 
and would take advantage of unusual runs, and there would be 
regularly a much lower price for the staple fishes, and occa- 
sionally the whole list would go down to exceedingly low prices 
as the result of exceptional catches. Thus the public may help 
itself to a decrease of prices by an increase of consumption. 

Nor is that all. Meat of all kinds is now in such demand 
that the price is slowly but steadily moving upward, and there 
is no possibility that it will go down until the demand slackens. 
That can be accomplished only by the introduction of some 
other foodstuff that will take the place of meat. Fish is the 
only such foodstuff in sight or in thought. Once fish is freely 
used, once it becomes a daily article of diet as meat now is, 
then there will be a drop in prices which will affect the whole 
provision list. 



1 am told by a revenue cutter officer who cruises regu- 
larly in the Arctic each summer that at Cape Nome they have 
a dance which gives points to the "grizzly bear." They call it 
the "polar bear." I cannot recall all the details of its evolutions 
save that, summed up, they are quite warm enough for the polar 
climate. They are anything but polar in their temperature. 
My friend says that in the Nome dance halls, during the long 
winter nights, with the thermometer outside many degrees be- 
low zero, no one dancing or even watching the "polar bear" is 
in danger of freezing to death. Happily, the genial climate of 
California is quite satisfied with the "grizzly bear." 

Mr. Asquith must be careful not to permit himself to fall 

into the habit of classifying every object he sees as something 
the suffragettes may and may not throw at him. 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 3, 1912. 



The Board of Supervisors and its 
Snubbing the Public. sanitary engineers seem to delight 

in ignoring the voice of the people 
when it comes to them in the nature of a protest against the 
Board's indifference to public health and such improvements as 
are needed for the better sanitation of the city. If the Board 
were hindered by lack of funds or engineering stu- 
pidity and ignorance there would be some excuse for delaying a 
work that should be considered an imperative duty, but the 
Board is not hindered by a lack of funds or competent 
engineers. Four years ago the city of San Francisco voted a 
sum sufficient to establish a plant for the incineration of gar- 
bage. Up to date even the site for the North Beach plant has 
not been selected, notwithstanding the fact that the money is 
available, and the city is paying interest on the money. 

It has been said that the delay is caused by negligence on the 
part of the City Engineer's department. If the engineers 
are negligent or incompetent, they should be given an indefinite 
vacation. As for the Board itself, the public is not blind, much 
less indifferent, and the time is coming when the Board of 
Supervisors will feel the weight of public indignation. Public 
officials cannot always depend upon public credulity or indif- 
ference to shield them. In this matter of a garbage incinerator 
the health of San Francisco is involved, and if an epidemic of 
fevers or other contagion results from the inaction or incom- 
petency of the Board of Supervisors, the Board will be respon- 
sible. The Supervisors may need to hear from a few pub- 
lic indignation meetings to arouse it to some sort of apprecia- 
tion of its duties, and the public is about near enough to the 
limit of patience to hold such meetings. Anyway, the people 
of San Francisco demand that substantial reasons be given for 
the delay in erecting the proposed garbage reduction works. 
The odor arising from garbage cans filled to the brim with de- 
composing matter is a serious affair, and the public is fully alive 
to the importance of having the sickness-breeding stuff re- 
moved and incinerated. A site should be purchased at once 
and construction of the plant put under way before the winter 
season advances. 

W 

The Appian Way of ancient Rome, 
For Service and Beauty, the Boulevards of Paris, the Unter 

den Linden of Berlin, the Riverside 
Drive of New York, and the Shell Road of New Orleans have 
been made famous in history by travelers because of their 
scenic attractiveness, panoramic views and picturesque per- 
spective, as well as because of the stability of their construc- 
tion. Yet none of these celebrated thoroughfares would com- 
pare with the Ocean Beach boulevard of San Francisco as a 
natural site for a popular drive and promenade way. Beginning 
as it does at the meeting of the waters of the Golden Gate and 
th© Pacific Ocean, thence following the beach southward for 
miles with the Pacific shore hard on the west and high hills 
and stretches of villa sites on the east, a region full of legends 
of Spanish colonial days. It is doubtful if such a site could 
be found in any city of the world for the scenic and panoramic 
views that made the Appian Way and the Unter den Linden 
famous. But the Beach boulevard is still in the "raw state," so 
to speak, and yet the cost of converting the site into one of the 
most attractive drive and promenade ways in the United States 
would be so small, by comparison. The wonder is that the 
whole city does not move as one man to the beautification and 
extension of the highway in the direction of Half Moon Bay, 
where it would connect with the system of thoroughfares now 
under construction by the State's Good Roads Commissioners, 
thus giving the Beach boulevard free course to the main cen- 
ters of pleasure and recreation in California. It would be a 
great mistake to hesitate to improve this natural and wonderful 



site, for when once raised to its possibilities as a public thor- 
oughfare for vehicles and pedestrians, its fame would go every- 
where. Undoubtedly if converted into a substantial boulevard 
the Beach road would surpass anything in the way of natural 
and artificial beauty in the United States, and of all the im- 
provements and conveniences contemplated in the celebration 
of the completion of the Panama Canal not one would be as 
attractive, nor one that would appeal more to visitors, as the 
Beach Boulevard, if constructed and beautified as the course 
and surroundings of the way invites and justifies. In fact, a 
Beach boulevard and promenade way would be the most popu- 
lar and conspicuous part of the city. 

3BT 

The evolution of American politics 
The Political Machine, is a curious and entertaining story, 

or, rather should we say, the 
evolution of the "machine" in politics, though in all its course 
the machine has not "evoluted" very far above its starting point 
— which was as now. "The end to be secured justifies the 
means!" The first thought of the manipulators of the forces 
of the machine is how best it may create and multiply devices 
to deceive. As a matter of fact, however, the means employed 
are generally themselves the end, for the processes of the 
machine make sure of the end before they are put in action, 
the objective point of the machine being to dwarf true states- 
manship and transform party principles into an ingenious con- 
spiracy against the unthinking. The strength of the machine 
is to be found in the over-elaboration of the machine's declara- 
tion of principles which is sent out to fool the voters. The 
history of all political parties in this country is that a great ef- 
fort is always made to convince the voter that suffrage is the 
very essence of democracy. The next work of a strictly parti- 
san political machine is to defy the supposed sanctity of the 
ballot box and deify the voter, but not until after he has voted. 

At this time, Hiram W. Johnson is telling and showing the 
people of California how to operate a political machine so that 
it will grind out a multiplication of arbitrary devices which, ac- 
cording to his code of political ethics, are righteous means to 
a holy end. The self-sacrificing Governor of California has 
a political machine of his own make which is to be run in de- 
fiance of the sanctity of the ballot-box. That is to say, the good 
and honest Governor has his political machine so greased that 
it will run down and hold up and rob the Republican organiza- 
tion of California and hand over the proceeds to Colonel Roose- 
velt, although the "live wire" Colonel has made it very plain 
to Governor Johnson and all other dear political servants that 
he is not going to run for President as an independent Republi- 
can candidate, or any other kind of a Republican. He proposes 
to have a brand new party, and cordially invites Republicans, 
Democrats, Socialists, Anarchists and the I. W. W. to join him 
in an heroic effort to restore the nation to the hands of himself 
and a few faithful friends. 

It is not important to the Colonel who votes for him, but he 
makes it plain that any one supporting his candidacy must agree 
to cut loose from former political affiliations and stick by him. 
He may need them in 1916. But as for Governor Johnson's at- 
tempt to hold up the Republican party in California, he does 
not deem it a steal or hold up in the sense the courts hold such 
acts as crimes, for the Colonel has granted him pardon and ab- 
solution before the act. All the same, Roosevelt's political tac- 
tics are congenial to the Governor's mind; besides, "Thou shalt 
not steal" does not count in the Governor's political ethics. "Get 
there, Eli!" is his slogan, and steal the Republican machine 
for the good of the common people is his sophistry. It would 
not be robbing Peter to pay Paul, for the Colonel insists that he 
is not in any sense a member of the Republican party. He is 
"It," yesterday, to-day and forever. 




'Hear the Crier? Who the de 



Labor Day this year will be a supreme effort on the part 

of the notorious leaders who continue themselves in power in- 
definitely to make a very large showing. For three years in 
succession the unions parading over the hot streets of old San 
Francisco have been unable to hide the fact that their numbers 
decreased continually. Last year a despairing cry went up to 
Sonoma County and to San Mateo, Alameda and Marin, to send 
over marchers, but even with this help the number of those 
marching dwindled by two thousand over the figures of the 
year before. 

David Lloyd George, British Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer, has awakened to the fact that his altruistic theories on 
behalf of labor are pure moonshine when it comes to getting 
practical results, as the syndicalists repudiate his efforts when 
they run counter to labor's wishes. George is awakening to a 
situation American employers realized years ago. 

The plaintiff in a local divorce suit entered the plea that 

he was entitled to compensation for the loss of his wife's affec- 
tions because she was a good cook. The wife retorted that he 
did not provide good dresses enough for a good cook. With 
such sententious hair-splitting thunderbolts do our divorce 
courts recklessly play. 

■ — — Local suffragettes are discussing what animal they will 
adopt as a party emblem. Nothing definite has been deter- 
mined, as the emblems are to be used on the hats, and the 
fashions in hats change so frequently that the animals can't 
keep pace with them. 

What can a poor landlubber, signed on the good ship 

"Pinafore," do when experts on the navy now admit that, under 
present naval conditions of war, there is nothing for a modern 
Dreadnaught to do but run away from the type of active and 
deadly submarines. 

Canadians have struck the joy pace : last year they im- 
ported automobiles valued at $3,798,589 from the United States 
and $314,182 of chu-chu wagons from England, a comparison 
which shows they have a keen appreciation for the better motor 
cars in which to express their joy. 

The local steam beer brigade is watching with bated 

breath and tense suspense the campaign against free lunch in 
Los Angeles. If it wins, the high cost of living will knock the 
lid off the sky along the local waterfront and south of Market 
street. 

Congress prints tons of matter regarding the interminable 

debates manufactured there, but the reading matter that reaches 
the Western constituent consists chiefly of campaign documents 
sedulously pleading for the renomination of the sender. 

Says Dr. Evans on snake-bites: "Whisky is not only 

useless, but it is harmful. For a snake-bite it is much better to 
do nothing than to give whisky." Gag the doctor before he can 
give his opinion on a flask of whisky as fish bait. 

Scholars on government are rapidly shouldering the old- 
time politicians away from the public crib. No wonder the wail 
of the high cost of living is inflating the empyrean. 



One that will play the devil, ^ir. with 



The last two naval engagements between Turkey and 

Italy, reported in the daily press, have turned out to be fakes. 
They served the purpose, however, of reminding the general 
reader that the war there was still underway. 

Fashion has just issued an ukase that next season's 

coiffure of lovely woman shall consist of fifty per cent false 
hair to furnish a background for the constructive art work, 
pediments and adornments. What's the use! 

There is logic in the contention of the California heiress 

that if a girl is conceded to be capable of voting she should also 
be thought capable of getting along without a chaperon — a 
conclusion woman's suffrage must reach. 

Governor Foss expects to be renominated by the Demo- 
crats of Massachusetts on the plea that his opponent is a bache- 
lor and must marry in order to qualify. No wonder the women 
are for the candidacy of Governor Foss. 

Old Britain certainly "do move." The agitation of the 

suffragettes has led the very elderly statesmen to at last grant 
complete manhood suffrage. Lord bless the ladies, they ac- 
complish ends they wot not of. 

And still in foreign quarters the absolute question pre- 
vails : Shall the nations of the world have a voice in the shap- 
ing of the management of the Panama Canal which Uncle Sam 
built at a cost of $400,000,000? 

Are the threats of the angry Irish to throw the visiting 

English suffragettes into the rivers and ponds an attempt to 
revive the old ducking stool to cut short the sharp-tongued 
women. 

A statistician has figured out that there are 20,000,000 

square miles of the earth's surface still uninhabited. What a 
joyful prospect for hustling real estate promoters! 

Club women in Chicago have given up the contest 

against the tight skirt. The contest was useless from the start : 
the skirts were the fashion — and that settled it. 

Madero has taken to a hospital for the last aid to the 

permanently injured : a bull moose movement has just broken 
out in unfenced Mexico. 

The Boston scientist who warns us to beware of soap 

certainly never made his investigations among the dust-covered 
streets of this city. 

New York's "finest" seem to possess the unenviable 

ability to develop the "finest" police department scandals that 
agitate the country. 

Governor Wilson is going to tackle the high cost of living 

in his fir*t speech. There's courage to tax his ingenuity and the 
country's patience. 

The "Progressives" seem to have acquired the crab 

action that was expected of them — going backward. 

Vaudeville prices are prevailing in the Third Party show 

billed for Chicago next week. 




ffWWv*?*^ 





George Shreve is a strict disciplinarian. He has in his em- 
ploy a good-looking chap who is a gay young blade and a great 
man with the ladies. Some time ago, Lothario took a trip 
across the pond, and stirred up the emotions of the dusky maids 
of Hawaii. His vacation was one long dream of delight, and 
he tore himself away from the fascinating environs of the 
Islands with the greatest reluctance. But the sweetest dream 
of all was to come later. On the return trip he found aboard 
the big ocear. liner a maid who fitted all his preconceptions of 
the ideal. She was a school teacher, but you'd never guess it 
from her appearance. She was dainty, demure and alluring. 

Forthwith and immediately Lothario attached himself to her 
train. Not another thought did he spend on the Honolulu girls. 
He courted Miss Dictionary with a persistence which awoke 
admiration even in the breasts of his rivals, but in spite of his 
maddest efforts, the object of his attentions remained lukewarm. 
There was no doubt that she was attracted, but her faith in the 
stability of his raptures was governed by a strain of cool, com- 
mon sense. She was mildly content to let time prove the ulti- 
mate test. When the steamer docked, she was surrounded by 
a group of homefolk who rushed her off to a south-bound train, 
and even though Lothario stuck gamely to the outskirts and 
tagged along behind, he was just a bit out of it. Still they 
parted with a warm handclasp, and he wrung from her a prom- 
ise to answer his letters. 

For the first month letters flew thick and fast, though it must 
be stated in all justice that the south-bound letters were 
thicker and faster. Lothario began to feel sorry for himself. 
He looked in the mirror. What the devil was the matter with 
the girl, anyway! And then he met — a peach. Correspond- 
ence began to languish, and finally died away. He met not only 
one peach, but many, for San Francisco is famed for pretty 
women. Gradually the Los Angeles girl assumed the unreal 
proportions of a dream creation, and finally slipped from his 
memory entirely. 

One night, about six months later, in rummaging through the 
drawers of his desk, he came across a long, silky glove. Like a 
flash he was back on shipboard with the dear, dainty little miss 
clinging to his arm. What a chump he'd been. There never was 
a girl like that one. At once with, the mood still on him, he sat 
down and indited a letter that would have done justice to Byron, 
that prince of lovers. He wrote it on the firm's stationery, 
the highly embossed note paper used only by the president 
himself, stamped and addressed it and sent it off. 

A week later the letter came back unopened, and being on the 
Shreve paper was taken to Mr. Shreve himself. That worthy 
gentleman opened it and conscientiously waded through the bil- 
lows of love which it inclosed. When he had finally mastered 
its contents and assimilated the name of the author, he wrote a 
letter. In it he complimented Lothario on his ability as a writer 
of love missives, but regretted to say that the Shreve paper 
was not to be used for that purpose, and that any further trans- 
gression would result in his dismissal. To top off Lothario's un- 
happiness came a communication in the same mail announcing 
the marriage of Miss Dictionary to an Eastern millionaire. 
W S V 

Edmund Mitchell, the well known Bohemian clubman and 
writer, sailed last week on the steamer Manuka for Tahiti. Mit- 
chell has signed up as scenario writer for the Melies moving 
picture concern, which has planned a wonderful trip through the 
islands of the Pacific, and expects to be away from active civili- 
zation, i. e., San Francisco, for at least a year. 



In consequence, there was an interesting assembly of 
Bohemia at the pier to see the Scotchman off on his journey. 
He was made the butt of much fun-poking, and one member of 
the group was loud in his protestations that he didn't want Mit- 
chell "et." The traveler was warned of the wilesome ways of 
the Pacific savage, and advised to go into training forthwith. 
They declared his plumpness would bring him to grief if he 
didn't get rid of it. 

From cannibals the talk veered to beggars, and Mitchell told 
a story that is worth repeating. Just preparatory to leaving 
Aden on his trip along the Mediterranean, the novelist was 
leaning over the rail of the vessel observing the antics of a 
group of natives on the dock directly below him. As he 
watched, there came down the wharf the thin, emaciated form 
of a lad about seventeen. He was garbed in the garments of 
nature, and his features were drawn and haggard, but the most 
remarkable thing about him was his stomach, or rather the ab- 
sence of it. Where that organ should have been the flesh 
curved inward under the ribs until it seemed as though the 
body through to the backbone could not have been more than 
half an inch thick. 

"It was the most terrible case of emaciation I ever saw," said 
Mitchell. 

As the boy came up to the ship he spied Mitchell at the rail, 
and immediately his hands went up in supplication, and then 
pointed to his stomach. The big-hearted Scotchman was shaken 
with the misery in his face, and digging down into his pocket, 
pulled out a handful of coins, which he lowered into the out- 
stretched hands. The transformation was instantaneous. In 
place of the dreadful cavity, the beggar's stomach swelled out 
to its normal proportions, and with an impish grin into the face 
of his astounded benefactor, he ran laughing away. 

"It is always well," said Mitchell, in conclusion, "to keep 
your heart in the right place. When it gets mixed up with your 
pocketbook, there's sure to be trouble." 
6 S B 

Why is an affinity? 

You'll admit that is a perfectly reasonable query. We have 
more affinities than children, and the more the righteous howl 
the more affinities we have. The Lookeron heard a story the 
other day which may explain the presence of the affinity 
species in more cases than one. 

A well known San Francisco business magnate had gone the 
usual way of married men and had taken unto himself a soul 
mate. Not that he in any way needed consolation — he had a 
very pretty home and a charming wife and more money than 
most, but there is a polygamous instinct in the average human 
male that seems to require attention. He installed the lady in 
quarters suitable to the housing of an affinity, and gave her 
carte blanche in the matter of spending. Being a man of some 
prominence, his affiliation with the new firm soon became 
known to his friends and his business associates; in fact, to 
every one but his wife. 

One day the latter went forth to purchase a new bonnet. Be- 
fore the mirror she tried on one hat after another, but no one 
seemed to exactly suit. Suddenly the saleswoman was smitten 
with an audacious idea. She was wise to the affinity, as was 
every one else in the store, where both women had accounts 
chargeable to the same man. With a hurried excuse she dis- 
appeared, only to return a minute later with a hat which was 
surely designed in heaven itself. This she tried on her cus- 
tomer's head, and the transformation was instantaneous. In- 



August 3, 1912. 



and California Advertiser 



stead of the mouse-like, drab appearance which generally 
characterized her, the wife's face, with its really exquisite and 
dainty features, under its new crown, took on a beauty that was 
as rare as it was charming. 

"Oh, Mrs. Blank," exclaimed the saleswoman in honest de- 
light, "you must take that hat. It's perfectly lovely on you." 
But on being told the price she declared she couldn't: Mr. 
Blank would think she had lost her mind. The saleswoman's 
thoughts inadvertently flew to the price of the affinity's last 
venture in millinery, and she promptly hardened her heart. 
"Don't you worry about that," she exclaimed. "Mr. Blank will 
love to see you in a hat as becoming as that." With many mis- 
givings the wife finally gave in. 

"Now," said the saleswoman, "we'll go right over to the suit 
department and get something to go with it. They had a gown 
over there yesterday that was just the thing." And bundling 
her bewildered customer along without so much as a "by your 
leave," she contrived to sell her the creation in question. 

That night when hubby came home, a wonderful vision met 
him. From the tips of her toes to the crown of her pretty head, 
which she had had becomingly dressed for the occasion, she 
was a winner, and Blank mentally pinched himself to see if 
he were really alive or just stewed again. But the vision 
remained and asked to be taken to dinner, and Blank, forget- 
ting that he was to dine with the affinity, said "Yes" with alac- 
rity. Now there isn't any affinity, and Mrs. Blank has learned 
that clothes will do more to hold a man's attention than all the 
virtues in the decalogue, morality notwithstanding. 

75 B 8 

Whatever may be thought of the justice of his report on the 
I. W. W. situation at San Diego, there can be no difference of 
opinion about the behavior of Colonel Harris Weinstock under 
a galling fire from both sides— from all sides, indeed. He has 
been courteous, patient, firm and good tempered in circum- 
stances that must have made a man of inferior mettle and poise 
rave with wrath. 

Let it be said that Colonel Weinstock did not seek the task 
of finding out and reporting what was going on at San Diego in 
that city's season of trouble. It sought him, was forced upon 
him through pressure upon his weakest — or strongest — point: 
that is, his sense of civic duty. He knew in advance that it 
was to be a thankless job, and so it has proved. It was patent 
to him that the San Diegans would resent any sort of State 
interference with their affairs, unless it came in the shape of a 
forcible deliverance from the pestilence of red-flaggers that 
afflicted them; he knew that the socialist agitators and the 
I. W. W. anarchists would be ill pleased with any findings that 
told the truth about their pernicious teachings and practices. 
Yet he proceeded calmly on his mission, fully conscious that 
it would bring him no reward except the knowledge that a 
disagreeable duty had been painstakingly performed. 

Since his return, and the publication of his report, Colonel 
Weinstock has been the object of an infinite variety of criticism 
and even of abuse. None of it has swerved him from the con- 
clusions and opinions arrived at by means of his investigation ; 
none of it has made him angry. He has replied with frankness 
and yet without asperity to those who have vitrioled him with 
invective and vituperation. In speech and in print he has met 
his critics, and not one of them can say that the special com- 
missioner is unfair in debate or acrimonious. 

Such service, calling for the judicial temperament, coupled 
with the highest order of courage, is a good deal to ask oi a 
man not in office, not in public life, seeking no popular reward 
or recognition. It is doubtful if Governor Johnson could have 
found another citizen to perform it. 



When womankind does fall for a "con," she falls hard. An in- 
stance in point of this contention is the initiative petition for 
resubmission of the race track bill. The hundreds who signed 
it with knowledge, and in the belief that racing is a good thing, 
have a right to their convictions — but the hundreds upon hun- 
dreds who signed under misunderstanding or the adroit ad- 
ministration of misinformation have a right to know how it all 
happened. 

The men who circulated these petitions were paid ten cents 
for each name scecured. At busy registration booths usually 
two worked together, and if the first appeal did not land the 
signature the alternate would say: "Then you'll surely sign 
mine 'to prohibit bookmaking,' " pointing to those words which 
appeared in black faced type on the petitions, which are some 
three pages long. Needless to tell you, the petitions were dupli- 
cates. That was one of the unfair devices. Another was to 
enclose the racing petition with some other, with a strong popu- 
lar appeal — Greater San Francisco or the Ruef pardon — and 
when the latter had been explained and signature obtained, a 
few pages would be flipped and the holder would say," and here 
too, please," pointing to a line on the racing petition. Few dis- 
covered the trick, and many signatures were secured by this 
means. Two voters, both women, signed on being told it was 
a petition for erection of a church. Others signed in the be- 
lief the restoration of racing would bring back the prosperity 
of bonanza days, when racing was in its palmy days in Cali- 
fornia. They overlooked the fact that bonanza mines and 
ranches and the big men of courage and daring and wide- 
visioning, who dominated those times and took chances in a 
clean way, are all gone. What killed horse-racing was the 
making of it a crooked, gamblers' game, instead of a kingly 
sport for gentlemen and gentlewomen. It is all of two decades 
since horses were allowed any part at all in it. The people who 
can afford horse-racing don't need book-making, and the rest 
of us want to be sure what we are voting for in that behalf. 
Trickery in their initial move doesn't indicate the methods of 
the promoters have changed or improved so very much. 



Pears' 

The public's choice since 1789. 

"Your cheeks are 
peaches," he cried. 

"No, they are 
Pears'," she replied. 

Pears' Soap 
brings the color of 
health to the skin. 

It is the finest 
toilet soap in all 
the world. 



Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leavea 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely perfumed powdered leaves t» 
carry In the purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 
prove the comp'exlon. Sent for 10 cents in stamps or coin. F. T. Hop- 
kins. 37 Great Jones SL. N T. 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 3, 1912. 



-Great Britain and Germany are drifting apart at a speed 



Sfc MJmjfe^f^c^AKain/' 



England's protest against the pro- 
A Diplomatic Tangle, posed bill granting free tolls to 

American ships using the Panama 
Canal, thus discriminating, as alleged, against the ships of 
other nations, has not been withdrawn, as reported from Wash- 
ington. England is staving off a diplomatic tangle. British 
statesmen contend that their country will lose nothing by not 
pressing a decision at this time. Their position is that with 
several United States Senators and Congressmen and the press 
of maritime Powers defending the attack on the alleged dis- 
crimination against the commerce contemplated by the Canal 
bill will gain by waiting until the measure is enacted into law by 
the American Congress. That is, England is willing to suspend 
pressure against the United States until enough American 
statesmen have been converted to England's interpretation of 
the Hay-Paunceforte treaty to make a bold stand against free 
tolls to American ships, and eventually, before the formal open- 
ing of the Canal, convince the Americans generally that Eng- 
land's protest is justified in the light of the so-called Canal 
treaty, but if the American sentiment shall continue to insist 
on free tolls to American ships, England would then be joined 
in her protest by the maritime nations of Europe, the Latin- 
American republics, and by China and Japan, which would 
make it an international question for the Hague tribunal to hear 
and determine. In this apparent postponement of the matter, 
England is indulging in her customary cunning and far-reach- 
ing statecraft. England knows, and the government at Wash- 
ington should know, that on such a question the United States 
would come away from a Hague court a thoroughly defeated 
litigant. Not purposely, perhaps, but true, nevertheless, the 
personnel of the court would, by the very leaning of the tribunal 
in international affairs, almost be obliged to decide against the 
free toll policy of the United States. But there is more to 
dread than defeat on the straight Canal toll issue. Already the 
press and leading men of pretty much all maritime nations are 
contending that the same tribunal would have the right and 
power to demand the abrogation of the Monroe Doctrine, for, 
as they say, and say truly, the Doctrine never was an inter- 
national question, but merely a dictum of the United States 
which has never had the approval of European nations, except 
of Great Britain, which was given by England to head off the 
designs of the "Holy Alliance" to undertake the conquest of 
Central and South America, and even to England the Doctrine 
is as hateful as to any other nation. All things considered, the 
English policy to not press that nation's protest at this time 
against the proposed free use of the Panama Canal by 
American ships is not a back-down, but rather an armistice to 
be enabled to rally other anti-Monroe Doctrine nations to her 
defense. It is practically admitted in official circles in London 
that the American and Canadian railways instigated the pro- 
test in the first place. 

Italy is expecting a good deal of sunshine to come out 

of Turkey's internal troubles, which seem to have reached the 
stage of open revolution. The "club of army officers" has de- 
manded that Parliament be prorogued, but the Sultan and the 
cabinet refuse to do anything of the kind, but it is not be- 
lieved that the club's influence in army circles is strong enough 
to create much of a revolutionary sentiment. The demand, 
which is an act of high treason in Turkey, shows how very un- 
certain the props of the government are, all of which stimulates 
Italy to make more exacting the terms of peace, and corre- 
spondingly weakens Turkey's war spirit. 

The army and navy budgets of the nations of the world 

since 1911 aggregate nearly three billion dollars, but of course 
expenditures will run through an average of about four years, 
though in the meantime large additional appropriations will be 
made for the maintenance of land forces, as the budgets re- 
ferred to are almost entirely for warship construction and naval 
expenditures. 

Persia is in a state of alarm because of reports that 

Russia is preparing for a fresh invasion. 



that shows restlessness and irritation. The Kaiser insists on 
carrying out his plan to put a third naval fleet in commission, 
to be composed of twenty-five battleships and full complement 
of smaller fighting boats. To this proposition the London gov- 
ernment replies by assuring the German War Lord that it will 
build two warships for every one Germany constructs. These 
banterings have strained the recently established entente be- 
tween the two nations, and no one is bold enough to predict 
when the crash will come. The fact is, however, that all Ger- 
many, except the Socialists, are patting the Kaiser on the back 
and assuring him that public sentiment is decidedly in favor of 
a third fleet of warships, and that he shall not want for the 
necessary government appropriations. Meanwhile, all England 
approves the declaration that the Admiralty will continue to 
lead Germany in ships and in sailors. The capitals of Europe 
are excited over the situation, and every one of them is count- 
ing on trouble between England and Germany sooner or later. 
It is not believed that a war between the two nations could be 
carried on a great while without involving all Europe. How- 
ever, all the world knows that the Kaiser is a past master in the 
game of diplomatic bluffing, but on the other hand England has 
made it clear to Germany that in any event John Bull will have 
two fighting ships to the Kaiser's one. It is on that fact the 
nations are basing their hopes that Germany will not go beyond 
the bluffing line. 

A French syndicate of capitalists has been formed to 

exploit Brazil. It is believed the government is behind the syn- 
dicate, and that the move has for its ultimate purpose the head- 
ing off of Germany's colonization scheme in the Latin-American 
States. 

Portuguese army officers who cast their lot with the 

monarchists think it wise to make haste to leave their native 
land. Many of them have gone to the Orient in search of jobs 
in China's new army. 

Australia, Brazil and Argentine declare against free 

Panama Canal tolls to American ships. They want to use the 
waterway, and object to being discriminated against. 

— —The Italian Minister for the Treasury announces a sur- 
plus of about $12,000,000. For fourteen consecutive years the 
nation has shown a large annual surplus. 

Franco-Italian amity is assured; at the same time the 

large investments of Frenchmen in Turkey are to be guarded 
against possible Italian assault. 

Mohammedans of North and Northwestern Africa object 

to the presence of Christian missionaries, and threaten to run 
them out. 

It is not that the people of Spain dislike their king 

that they want to kill him. They are for a republic at any cost. 



The panhandler met the prosperous man in the corridor 

of the office building. "I am down and out," whined the pan- 
handler; "can't you help me?" "Yes," replied the prosperous 
man; "just press that button on the elevator there and the 
operator will take you in and up." — Cincinnati Enquirer. 



CHAMPAGNE 



PIPER-HEIDSIECK 



Anc n - e M°. n HEIDSIECK fondee en 1785 
KUNKELMANN &C? Succ r . s 

REIMS 

Charles Meinecke & Co. 



Agents Pacific Coast 



314 SACRAMENTO ST,, S. F. 



August 3, l'A2. 



and California Advertiser 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



The Directors of the Kennett Consolidated Copper Companies offer the FIRST 
ALLOTMENT of 100,000 Shares, 7% Cumulative Preferred, Par value $3.00, 
each at $1.25 per share and 250,000 Shares Common Stock, Par value $3.00, 
at 75c per share. 

Kennett Consolidated Copper Companies 



Organized under the Laws of Arizona, July 5, 1911. Fully paid 
and Non-Assessable. 



Capital Stock 



$3,750,000.00 



1,250,000 shares, par value $3.00 each, divided into 350,000 

seven per cent Cumulative Preferred — Par Value, $3.00 each. 

900,000 Common Shares, Par Value $3.00 each. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

FRANK W. LEAVITT President 

(Twelve years Senator in the California Legislature.) 

WILLIAM K. KENT Vice-President and General Manager 

Attorney-at-Law, Mine Owner. 

EUGENE S. VAN COURT Secretary 

C. J. KENT Director E. M. KNOPH. . . .Director 

CONSULTING ENGINEER. 

EDWARD H. BENJAMIN, M. E., Many years President of the 

California Miners' Association. 

Properties Owned by the Kennett Consolidated Copper Companies 

1. Big Back Bone Group. 2. The Elsie Group. 3. Keystone 

These three groups of claims comprise 50 U. S. Mining loca- 
tions, 20, 18 and 12 respectively, approximating 1,000 acres, 
and are situated in the Back Bone Mining District of the Shasta 
County Copper Belt, in Sections 18, 19 and 20, Township 34 
North, Range 5 West, about six miles by wagon road from the 
railroad and smelter town of Kennett on the Southern Pacific 
Railroad, 18 miles north of Redding, the county seat. 

They lie on the same belt as the Mountain Copper Company's 
(Iron Mountain) properties, the Trinity, Balaklala, Shasta 
King and Mammoth), and are less than two miles from the 
workings of the Mammoth Mine, a property owned by the 
United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company of Bos- 
ton, a corporation capitalized at $75,000,000. 

SHASTA COUNTY COPPER. 

The Shasta County Copper Belt already ranks fifth in the 
Copper production of the United Stales, and is one of the few 
copper districts where copper can be profitably mined when the 
metal is selling at less than 12 cents per pound. 

Copper is the chief product and the basis of the mining pros- 
perity and prospects of Shasta County, which is far in the lead 
of the mineral producing counties of the State of California. 

From 1894 to 1910. this county has produced copper of a 
value of over Fifty Million Dollars ($50,000,000.) 

Briefly summarized, the advantages of the Kennett Consoli- 
dated are : 

1. A porphyry copper — the kind that pays the biggest divi- 
dends. 

2. The properties cover an extensive mineralized area — nearly 
1,000 acres. 

3. Located in a copper belt ranking FIFTH IN PRODUC- 
TION in the United States. 

4. Adjacent to the greatest producing mine in California, a 
regular dividend payer. 

5. Surfaced and underground similarity to the other big mines 
of the district. 

6. Formation indicative of extensive ore bodies. 



7. Worked by tunnels, reducing working costs to a minimum. 
No expensive hoisting and pumping. 

8. Timber and water abundant. 

9. Smelters, power and railroads close at hand. 

10. Small capitalization for a big porphyry copper. 

11. First issues of stock at a very low price. 

12. Celebrated Engineer's report says : "The formation is 
identical with that of the MAMMOTH property, which it ad- 
joins, and when I first examined the MAMMOTH property in 
1896 there was no better showing at that time than there is now 
on the Big Back Bone property." 

This is the first great Porphyry Copper stock ever offered in 
the United States on such a small capitalization. 

For six years the properties have been developed by the 
owners on a business basis and with their own capital. They 
will continue to be so managed for the profit of all. 

They have now reached the stage where large capital is ab- 
solutely necessary to continue operations on a large scale and 
provide diamond drills, machinery, etc. 

It is assumed that the proceeds of this First Issue will furnish 
all the capital required, and make of the properties another 
"Mammoth" Mine. They have everything that the "Mammoth" 
had ten years ago. Expert Copper Engineers' reports say they 
are equally as good. Capital can make them just as valuable. 
At the present market price of copper (17^j cents per pound) 
the "Mammoth" is yielding an annual profit of two million 
dollars. 

Just think of a profit of $2,000,000 on such a small capitaliza- 
tion as ours. 

Such are the possibilities of these properties. Copper will 
be a scarce metal in a few years. 

HERBERT C. HOOVER, IN HIS "PRINCIPLES OF MIN- 
ING" PAGE 38, SAYS: 

"In copper the demand is growing prodigiously. If the 
growth of demand contin